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I replaced my front turn signals with Buells this afternoon (like the bottom of this thread). All seems fine, but I've got some strange behaviour.

From reading other posts here and elsewhere on the net, I was expecting the 10W bulbs to flash faster than the originals. At first they didn't, which was fine, but after riding for 15 or 20 minutes the behaviour changed. The left signal would flash twice at a normal slow pace and then start flashing rapidly. The right signal still flashed slow. When the bike was turned off, with the key at On, the signals returned to flashing slow. I did manage to get the right signal to flash fast once with the ignition on by leaving it on for most of a minute. After the bike sat for a couple hours, I rode it home and the signals would flash slow unless I revved the engine.

If the bulbs were flashing fast from the get go like I originally expected I would not care much. But the unpredictable behaviour is making me nervous. So I'll be looking around town for a 21W orange bulb, but in the meantime should I be worried about possible damage to the wiring, the lights or the fuses?
 

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What ever happened

Did you figure it out Run Out-? I have just put a couple Buell's with the 10W bulbs, front L and R. I too might not mind the faster flashing if it's OK for the wiring and legal in California. I figure faster flashing maybe seen better, or not.:yikes:

There is a formula in electronics P=IE where P is power, I is the current (amps drawn) and E is the voltage. But I can't remember (and lost the math to solve the equation) if a smaller wattage draws more or less current-? Has to do with Resistance ....

Anybody have a clue-?
Thanks much,
-DT
 

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I also installed Buells and they instilled the rapid-rate flash. On the first flash for either side they would be normal, but then by the second and all subsequent flashes they went hyper. On 4-way flash they were normal.

I wound up buying 21 watt amber 1156 bulbs (single-element auto turn signal) and grinding off one of the bayonet lugs (because they are not 180 degrees apart like the bayonet socket). All works fine now.

For the electrical formula, I recall from A&P school:

E = electromotive force (volts)
I = inductance (amps)
R = resistance (ohms)
W = watts

Values are used in the following formula variations:
E = I times R
I = E divided by R
R = E divided by I
W = E times R
E = W divided by R
I = W divided by E

So the difference between a 10w bulb and a 21w bulb would be:

10 watts divided by 12 volts = 0.833 amps
21 watts divided by 12 volts - 1.75 amps

While almost twice the amperage draw, it is still well within a 5 amp fuse / wiring rating. And the load is intermittent, so there are no concerns of burning up wires.

I used to have flush-mounts, but replaced them because I like the projection outward of the Buells, makes the turn singals more noticable to vehicles facing me.
 

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Thanks for the equations.

Thanks DonStrom6
I knew there were more derivations of the PIE formula but couldn't remember without digging out my old FCC study guides. I thought that the higher the wattage the more current; it just makes sense ... I guess.:confused: I need to re-study electronics 101.
I am replacing just my front turn indicators. I bought a pair of the Buell lights which I like the looks of but mostly the much lower price-!!
I also like the faster flash rate of the combo of the 21W and 10W on the same circuit and am tempted just to leave it be except for the little voice in my head.
I am going to look for the bulbs you mention just the same but am not sure what you mean about grinding off one of the lugs-? Maybe you mean on the socket and not the base of bulb (the lead part)?
Thanks again,
DTz
 

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No, I had to grind off one of the lugs on the bulb base. The socket slots are at 0 and 180 degrees, while the 1156 bulb base has the lugs at 0 and 120degrees (or so). I wish I knew how to embed pics!

But it's no big deal either way. At first I liked the hyper-flash, then it got annoying to me so I sought a solution.

Good luck and good riding!
 

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The 1156 bulb has lugs 180 degrees apart. The bulbs in DL650 signals that have clear lenses instead of amber use 7507 bulbs with the pins 150 degrees apart. Manufacturers started using the BAU15S sockets that only 7507 amber bulbs fit so people would not put clear 1156 bulbs in turn signals with clear lenses.

Image uploading. Refresh page to view
 

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In all humbleness and humility, I stand corrected.

The bulbs were Osram 7507 that had to have a lug cut off, due to the 150 degree (that's 150; not 120, not 180, but ONE HUNDRED FIFTY DEGREE) pattern on the lamp base.

The Buell's have 180 degree slots. To this I swear. No lie.

Good luck with your bike. If you have any other concerns, you know who to ask.
 

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Did you check the rear signal on the side that is flashing quickly? The flashing will accelerate if the rear is cutting out due to corrosion or a loose connection.
 

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Two important possibilities.

The first and most likely chance is, I think, a loose connection.
Whenever I have a problem with a computer or motorcycle,
that is where I put my first efforts. This usually works.

The second is to check the grounds, especially in a circuit where several bulbs
(or filaments) share a ground, as is abundantly true in our motorcycles.

Last summer I observed very erratic behavior of my van's taillights,
and everything cleared up when I ran new soldered ground wires.

Sometimes you see a car brake, whereat one taillight gets brighter while the other goes off. Here is the situation. The taillight that goes out has no ground connection. So how does its taillight turn on when the brake is released? Well, power goes through its taillight filament, then through its brake filament to the unpowered line from the brake switch. From there, power flows through the other taillight bulb's brake filament to ground.

It is of course a ten-minute fix that is totally beyond the skills of 90% of motorists.
Perhaps the actual number is more than 90%; I doubt it is less. That is sad.

Keith
 
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