StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The fuse went out on my 2013 dl650 and it stopped on dry pavement very well.
On dry pavement I don't get a kick back if I push to hard on back brake and it seems the front brakes are easier to pull.
It rains a lot here so I put a new fuse in.
I like the ABS, it is very good in the rain, have never lost traction in the rain.

What is your opinion?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
ABS goood. It would have saved my last bike from fishtailing when I took a turn too fast. Turned a simple lowside into a highside.

It's one of those things you'll never miss until you find yourself in an emergency.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bruce777

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,366 Posts
A generation or 2 ago in ABS technology a skilled rider could out brake the system. Of course that is under controlled not emergency conditions.

The latest lean angle ABS is supposed to be superior to a human.

In everyday riding you wouldn't ever activate the ABS. I'm a believer in practicing panic stops from the speeds you ride, activating the ABS.

IMO it's more a mental hurdle to get on the brakes hard from highway speeds, work up to it. My theory
that by experiencing it at speed unconscious reluctance/hesitation can be reduced.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bruce777

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,352 Posts
If you are good enough to threshold brake the ABS never kicks in.

I know I've stopped harder on my ABS equipped bikes on and off road than I could on the non-ABS bikes and that's mainly because I have the confidence that I can really squeeze that lever hard INSTANTLY and the front won't wash out on me.

You'll never know how hard a bike can stop until a kangaroo appears on the road in front of you when you are on a two day old bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Does your back brake kick, if you press it real hard or is there something wrong with my back abs brake?
It happens if I don't put on my front brakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
285671


Anti-lock brake systems engage when you brake hard enough to lock up the wheel. Any wheel. Independent of the other. Rear wheel abs are the ones you'll notice being used because they're the lighter of the two in a stop, and therefore more likely to lock up. The rear brake will lock up and kick-in ABS if its the only brake being used. Front wheel has ABS too, but you'll never see that in testing unless you hard brake in mud and purposefully try to lock up and wash out the front wheel.

So no. Your abs is working perfectly.
 

·
Registered
2020 Suzuki V-Strom 650 XT Adventure
Joined
·
32 Posts
I have watched this video a couple of times. It is a good explanation of the different braking types and the results through testing and different types of bikes. At about 8:50 in the video the real meat starts for bikes only.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
Great vid. Didnt know Bret had his own youtube. Hes my favorite guy on Mototrek.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Does anyone know what year the abs on dl650 on dry pavement is better than a human?
Does my 2013 not have the best ABS?
Is that a reason to buy newer bike?
Your wife cares about safety, so when you want a new bike this would be helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,366 Posts
Does anyone know what year the abs on dl650 on dry pavement is better than a human?
Does my 2013 not have the best ABS?
Is that a reason to buy newer bike?
Your wife cares about safety, so when you want a new bike this would be helpful.

The 650 doesn't have the 5 axis Bosch ABS just the 1000 (starting in 2018).
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bruce777

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
The ABS on my 2011 650 is miraculous. I have experimented with it a lot on wet grass, snow, mud, dry pavement, etc.
If I were a betting man, I would wager serious money that the ABS on my bike can beat 98% of riders.

Yes, the 5 axis and "cornering" ABS (they all have their proprietary name for it) is even better.

The various mc racing associations will soon have the dilemma of whether or not to allow the very sophisticated ABS to be used. Because at the high end, those systems are rapidly improving to the point where they can beat 90% of the talented mc racers. Do they then also allow traction control? How much does the human still actually operate or matter?

The motobot hasn't beaten Rossi's best lap time......yet. Meet the motorbike-racing robot
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,366 Posts
...
The various mc racing associations will soon have the dilemma of whether or not to allow the very sophisticated ABS to be used. Because at the high end, those systems are rapidly improving to the point where they can beat 90% of the talented mc racers. Do they then also allow traction control? How much does the human still actually operate or matter?
...

Moto GP bikes have had traction (and wheelie) control for about a dozen years or so. Most think that the 250+ horsepower bikes would be un-rideable without it.

A lot of high sides in the days of the 500cc 2 stroke Moto GP bikes. No traction control back then!

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I agree with Bruce777, for my DL1000 anyway.

On my 2018 dl1000 on good dry pavement, the abs seems to kick in too soon. When I try to threshold brake, the the abs engages.When I pull the fuse, it seems to stop quicker/harder.

My 2014 dl650 was similar to my 06 r1200rt. Both were capable of very hard braking before abs engagement, got the rear tire to lift on the rt. Never pulled a fuse on those two bikes.

It's probably just me, I also didn't like the feel of the stock M/C on my dl1000. Got a Nissan radial M/C that I much prefer. Get the same feeling of abs kicking in too soon with both M/C. Wish I could fine tune that engagement point.

All that said, abs is a great way to learn how much traction different surfaces have, also great safety feature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,352 Posts
If the ABS engages you aren't threshold braking. It's really that simple, the ABS only cuts in when it detects a difference in the rate the front and rear wheels are spinning. Finding out why one wheel is sliding may be the win here.

Either too much front brake or too much rear is being applied and it's generally rear. I'm not sure if the later DL's have linked brakes but that has been reported as a root cause of poor braking on some bikes. (Hit the front, the rear also kicks in, but harder than it should and that causes the ABS to kick in).

The other possibility is that your tires have really poor grip. I know on my 2014 with Road 5's the braking capability is really high. Rear wheel in the air, front tire moaning because it's deforming so much. Or, since this did happen to me :), if your steering head bearings are loose the front will stop momentarily as the front wheel moves back when the brakes come on, that also gets the ABS to kick in.

I'm comfortable that I can stop faster on both my 2012 650 and 2014 1000 with ABS - and that's mainly due to the lack of delay in hitting the front brake really hard rather than how much the bike slows once the brake is applied. I don't have to waste time feeling for the limit of grip, just squeeze the lever and speed starts peeling off NOW. A seconds delay @80kph is 20m and that's a huge difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
Without a decent G-meter it's hard to tell what is actually stopping more effectively by feel.

If you are willing to do several or many data points for measured stopping distance (same day, same time, same surface, same temperature, etc etc etc, that could prove or disprove if one can break better (shorter) with or without ABS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
The ABS on my 2011 650 is miraculous. I have experimented with it a lot on wet grass, snow, mud, dry pavement, etc.
If I were a betting man, I would wager serious money that the ABS on my bike can beat 98% of riders.

Yes, the 5 axis and "cornering" ABS (they all have their proprietary name for it) is even better.

The various mc racing associations will soon have the dilemma of whether or not to allow the very sophisticated ABS to be used. Because at the high end, those systems are rapidly improving to the point where they can beat 90% of the talented mc racers. Do they then also allow traction control? How much does the human still actually operate or matter?

The motobot hasn't beaten Rossi's best lap time......yet. Meet the motorbike-racing robot
I like mine on my 2011. I have experimented with it on and off pavement and have contemplated trying it with the fuse removed, but it simply works very well in "operational" mode to worry about it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
74 Posts
On my 2011 DL 650 I've had the ABS try to run me off a loose gravel mountain road. Steep down hill turn, front wanted to "tuck" at turn in, tried to lock rear to rotate. peddle went dead bike kept going.
Had to "layerdown" Tusk box makes for a good friction break. Also willing to blame operator error on my part. I now have a cut off switch for gravel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
The other situation that ABS would make worse is shortest stopping distance in loose sand. For that, locking up the back to plow a furrow while maintaining rotation and control with the front wheel would be about your best bet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,352 Posts
Works quite well in sand, simply because you can really hammer the brakes which buries the wheel deeper and gives you more to brake against. I've been surprised how well the DL ABS works, even in situations where it should be a liability.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top