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I just made this account... I am new to this site... not new to ATVing, Dirtbikes, and bikes.

my question is did I not buy a KLR650 to buy a sporty fake Starbucks off road bike?

it works and rides really nice on the road. just don't attempt to go down dirt roads.

is there a high fender kit? I googled. for a while but all I found was a 1/2" riser block kit. seriously? is a road construction site in Nebraska what stops these bikes?

I had a naked 500 ninja with dual sport tires on it that I rode thru level B & C roads in Iowa and Nebraska all the time and took it out to Montana, ND, SD, so on and down to silly silt in the nevada desert and never once had issues like this crap.

 

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Welcome to the forum.

So you didn't do any homework before you bought? I would have thought that if you had wanted a dedicated off road bike that you would not have given the Vstrom even a first glance.
BTW - there are lots of Vstrom that go RTW as well as off road. Maybe should have kept your Ninja?
Even the KLR can get stuck.
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What's your point? You came to a Vstrom forum to disparage the Vstrom? That's called trolling.
No. I want parts. or I will make my own. I did some "research"... I watched videos of guys riding both. I have ridden KLR's. they are off road. just as long as you live 2 miles from the trail. but I thought I'd like something that could do 85 all across Nebraska to Colorado and or 90 to the bad lands and then ride another thousand once I got there of back roads.

everyone hyped the dl650 and 1000. I don't dislike it.

I just want to never have a road project stop the bike because of no clearance.

i know things get stuck. I have been playing in the real world for a long enough time. but to have a little bit of clay and a few gravel turn your front tire into a brick. that just seems a major design flaw. looking thru the older posts. there isn't much I see for options. is it really that I am so special that I got stuck by a little bit of clay and no one else ever had that happen? or is it common? and other Starbucks guys avoid the muck of the real world and ride paved and semipaved roads?

once I get these lessons learned of what's junk on this bike and will get me stuck and or stranded. I will fix it and make it better and go back out and ride all over like I use to with the ATV's and dirtbikes and that "ninja". I had 2,700 miles on a brand new 09 grizzly in the fist 4-6 months. I put 15,000 on that "ninja". I want 100,000 on this 650. in a few years.

I have had it for less then a month and already put a 1,000 just seeing what needs and does.

but this fender has to go.

I'llven buy a fork brace and drill holes and mount a dirt bike fender if need be.
 

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That has been done using our fork brace and generic dirt bike fenders. High fenders have also been done since the bike first came out.

We have a fender raising kit for that model. Most people find it does enough to accommodate use off road with more aggressive tires.

I suspect my X300 High Fender mount might work with V-Stroms, but it hasn't been tried yet.
 

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"I'll even buy a fork brace and drill holes and mount a dirt bike fender if need be."

@GearBolt, I'm pretty sure there is at least one member on here who has done exactly that. Or has cut apart the stock fender and mounted it above the fork brace. Not quite sure at the moment. Maybe one of them will chime in here, or you maybe could do a site search for "high front fender" or some such text.

Also, welcome to the forum. :)
 

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The DL series bike is like 90/10 tires 90% road 10% off pavement as in groomed fire roads. The 6 inches of ground clearance and 500 pound curb weight should have clued you in.

As far as the KLR its a POS compared to the post 1996 DR650. he DR650 is a better bike and has been for years Lighter and better on/off road manners. But still a 70/30 bike.

If you want serious off road capabilities the none of the above is a valid choice.
 

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No. I want parts. or I will make my own. I did some "research"... I watched videos of guys riding both. I have ridden KLR's. they are off road. just as long as you live 2 miles from the trail. but I thought I'd like something that could do 85 all across Nebraska to Colorado and or 90 to the bad lands and then ride another thousand once I got there of back roads.

everyone hyped the dl650 and 1000. I don't dislike it.

I just want to never have a road project stop the bike because of no clearance.

i know things get stuck. I have been playing in the real world for a long enough time. but to have a little bit of clay and a few gravel turn your front tire into a brick. that just seems a major design flaw. looking thru the older posts. there isn't much I see for options. is it really that I am so special that I got stuck by a little bit of clay and no one else ever had that happen? or is it common? and other Starbucks guys avoid the muck of the real world and ride paved and semipaved roads?

once I get these lessons learned of what's junk on this bike and will get me stuck and or stranded. I will fix it and make it better and go back out and ride all over like I use to with the ATV's and dirtbikes and that "ninja". I had 2,700 miles on a brand new 09 grizzly in the fist 4-6 months. I put 15,000 on that "ninja". I want 100,000 on this 650. in a few years.

I have had it for less then a month and already put a 1,000 just seeing what needs and does.

but this fender has to go.

I'llven buy a fork brace and drill holes and mount a dirt bike fender if need be.
Having tried to re-read this it is amazingly nonsensical.
 

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The DL series bike is like 90/10 tires 90% road 10% off pavement as in groomed fire roads. The 6 inches of ground clearance and 500 pound curb weight should have clued you in.

As far as the KLR its a POS compared to the post 1996 DR650. he DR650 is a better bike and has been for years Lighter and better on/off road manners. But still a 70/30 bike.

If you want serious off road capabilities the none of the above is a valid choice.
Yea it's pretty obvious a Strom is not much of an off-road warrior! Seems like the OP should have realized the front fender would get packed with mud.

Any low fender will pack up the front wheel on any bike if you're dumb enough... errr.... unfortunate enough to ride into sticky mud. Not the bike's fault.
 

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I just made this account... I am new to this site...
So now that we have established that heat draws _ heat.
I've seen some guys with full knobbies and skid plates do single track at the same speed as anyone else. Then they ride it home in comfort at 75mph. Like any other bike you'll choose the right sprockets. Maybe add a pair of Rick's raising links. You'll be fine.
This is a excellent forum and you will find helpful people. Cool draws _ cool. Welcome.
 

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Even a crecent wrench, which can undo many fasteners is capable of rounding the heads off other fasteners. Gotta pick the right tool for the job. But salvation for the front fender is to rip that sucker off and get and Acerbis floppy dirt bike fender and mount it high.There are posts here about it. Ugly but effective.
 

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The Stroms are street bikes, pure and simple. Like most "standard" street bikes they do fine on most dirt roads, and someone who's a capable off-road rider can get them through rougher stuff than that. But, even with a bunch of mods you still have a bike that weighs 500lb , with a high center of gravity, a bunch of fragile plastic bodywork, and less than 6" of ground clearance and suspension travel.
If you bought one thinking it would be a good off-road tool, I'm sorry.
 

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I think there are quite a few bikes that could do what is shown on the video, but the tires seem to be biggest problem. Fender clearance is relevant here, certainly, but slick clay goop is going to be a challenge for any tire less than 10/90.

The Storm is not a dual sport. It does well, in capable hands, and with appropriate tires, in many situations. But you can go beyond the intended limit of any bike if you try hard enough. It is not a KLR; no one here thinks it is. And thank the gods that is is not a Ninja 500....
 

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I've had a pure dirt bike, I've had a KLR and now I have my DL650. Each of these are better in some areas and weaker in others. There's a reason I own a DL650 now and not one of the other two. You have to approach this as if you have a pie called Capabilities, and it's equivalent to 100% of everything the bike can do. Thing is you have to make a decision as to where to put the sum total of 100% between off-road capabilities and on-road capabilities. Truth is I think the DL650 is much more dirt road capable than many give it credit for, but not out of the box. The KLR, much more dirt capable out of the box. My 08 DL650 is a bike I seem to keep coming back to over and over again. It's a very good blend of both, and I think it's a 60/40 tarmac/dirt bike. But here are some key changes that were made to the bike to make it that way:
1. Suspension (Elka rear/racetech emulators front)
2. Crash protection (skid plate/engine guards)
3. Better footpegs (Touratech wide pegs - because you need to be standing a lot when on the dirt)
4. High front fender (for the type of mud you encountered - downside is it doesn't block muddy water as well)
5. Tires (705's are good for dry gravel, after that you need 804/805's or similar)
6. Pro-taper Hi ATV bars (helps with standing up and generally better for fast riding than the stock bars)
7. Bark Busters or some knockoffs

And if I had to start with just two of those, start with 3 and 5. Get good pegs and good tires. Learn to ride standing up. In that muck you were in, the bike barely stood a chance. You talk about how it wasn't capable, but really the biggest issue you encountered was mud caked in the front fender, a common scenario for any hybrid bike. So you are trying to take a 400+lb bike with a rider through soft caking mud. I doubt anything but a TW200 would have been a struggle.

My bike in Butte, MT about to head up to Dawson City, YT
270744

In the background, we are on Henry's Lake near Yellowstone on the Idaho side
270745

Outside Polebridge MT
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Somewhere on the AlCan Hwy this past summer
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And having no problem keeping up with traffic on the Dragon, even with all my camping crap
270748


It's taken me to lots of amazing places, and it's done it with absolute confidence and with the dependability of a hammer. It's a good bike. Ride it and it will serve you well.
 

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I have been pleased where my Wee has taken me, but I try not to ride in mud as I know in certain regions there is mud that no bike will make it through as it just packs. With a dirt bike it usually jams the rear tire. The only place I will not ride my Wee is single track. I have used it to explore many roads where high clearance 4X4 are recommended. In some places it has been slow going compared to riding my DT200 2 stroke dual sport, but the paved sections were way more enjoyable on the Wee. First thing I replaced were the stock tires and then I put a real skid plate on it. My last set of tires were the Motoz Adventure tractionators, 25 road 75 off road. Those tires took the bike through places it should not have been.
 

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I have been pleased where my Wee has taken me, but I try not to ride in mud as I know in certain regions there is mud that no bike will make it through as it just packs. With a dirt bike it usually jams the rear tire. The only place I will not ride my Wee is single track. I have used it to explore many roads where high clearance 4X4 are recommended. In some places it has been slow going compared to riding my DT200 2 stroke dual sport, but the paved sections were way more enjoyable on the Wee. First thing I replaced were the stock tires and then I put a real skid plate on it. My last set of tires were the Motoz Adventure tractionators, 25 road 75 off road. Those tires took the bike through places it should not have been.
I've been looking at the Motoz Tractionators as my next set of tires. I really like the Shinko 705s for a general all around good tire, but they really lack when there's mud. And airing them down only helps a little in that situation. But the main drawback for me is mileage, my trips are on average 6000 miles or so. What's the avg mileage you get out of a set and was this loaded and at speed on the tarmac or mostly dirt?
 
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