StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just wanted to say thanks and so long to all the helpful folks on this forum, especially Greywolf. I appreciate the helpful advice I've received. I just watched my Wee depart with its excited new owner. I'm retiring forever from motorcycles (for the third time); this was my second Wee and the 49th motorcycle I've owned in my 55 years of riding.

The second time I retired forever from motorcycles, I bought a Mazda Miata sports car to ease the pain of withdrawal... it was a nice little car, though inappropriate for the roads I must travel, but was just not sporty enough to replace a motorcycle, so I got back into them and went through another dozen or so. This time I'm getting a dune buggy, it looks like it will be uncomfortable enough to more adequately simulate a motorcycle... needed the money to get a projected airplane project in the air... didn't quit because I'm 72, still consider myself enough of a kid to deal with fun toys such as airplanes and motorcycles. Best wishes to all and hope you get as much pleasure from your bikes as I have from mine over the decades.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,613 Posts
Thank you

WOW 49 bikes and 55 years of riding. You must get one more to round out the numbers.
I've been licensed 42 years but only owned 3 bikes so far because I had a brain fart that lasted over 30 years so didn't ride.
 

·
What Kinda Bike Is That?
Joined
·
5,522 Posts
... needed the money to get a projected airplane project in the air... didn't quit because I'm 72, still consider myself enough of a kid to deal with fun toys such as airplanes and motorcycles.
Airplane project? Did you say airplane project? Oh, please don't stop there! Do Tell!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,856 Posts
Yes, the new 2012 Wee should take it's rightful place as your 50th and final motorcycle... We salute you Sir...:patriot:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
You are my "Inspiration for the Day" today Sir Errandboy... God bless you in whatever you decide to do in the next chapter of your life - I'm pretty sure you'll have fun whatever you do!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Airplane project? Did you say airplane project? Oh, please don't stop there! Do Tell!
I'm trying to purchase a VW powered Avid Flyer minor project. I've been waiting for a paperwork problem it has with the FAA before I make the move. If it doesn't come through, will get back to work on a long standing project in my shop, a single seat Starduster midget biplane (similar to a Pitts, but a bit more docile) onto which I have hung a 2.2 liter Subaru Legacy engine to replace a 150 hp Lycoming. All the wiring is done aft of the firewall, need to finish wiring forward of the firewall but then have to tear down and recover the entire airframe, a major project for one such as I who is slow and enjoys the work but spends more time admiring what I've just done than doing what needs to be done next.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
I am just a kid here. I didn't own my own first motorcycle until about 1964. Since then I've owned far more than I remember, but some I will never forget.

I am now 64 years young and still have two motorcycles, my Wee and my beloved 1050 Tiger. I flew for 25 or 30 years but the cost finally made me step away from it. I always intended on building my own plane but the wife is dead set against it. Maybe I will outlive her!

Enjoy your new hobbies and I am sure you have many great memories of the bikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I am just a kid here. I didn't own my own first motorcycle until about 1964. Since then I owned fora more than I remember, some I will never forget.

I am now 64 years young and still have two motorcycles, my Wee and my beloved 1050 Tiger. I few for 25 or 30 years but the cost finally made me step away from it. I always intended on building my own plane but the wife is dead set against it. Maybe I will outlive her!

Enjoy your new hobbies and I am sure you have many great memories of the bikes.
Thanks, flying is not a new hobby, been flying for over 50 years. I agree it's not inexpensive but I control the expense by staying with experimental amateur built, far less expensive regulation, and I live in the boonies with my own airstrip in front and hangar in back. Also I am single with no significant other to force intelligent decisions on me!

I took early retirement over 20 years ago and inflation has nibbled at my meager pension, but decided to try to learn to get along on less rather than make more money, pay more taxes, etc. I'll take poverty over employment any day! Besides it's provided me with a new life time goal: To spend more time in retirement than working. So far, so good, 21 years down, 9 to go!

You're right about motorcycle memories, especially my favorite bikes, my first Harley, a 1950 hardtail panhead, which was a tremendously rugged and reliable steed I used as an off road dirt bike, and the four Honda Valkyries, which are incredible low maintenance high performing SMOOTH rides.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
CAVU and Happy Landings, Sir!

I've always considered motorcycling "flying, on the ground," and am happy to read you've got the near-perfect situation to continue getting airborne. As for my flying, it's 'one more thing I can't afford' since my uncle sold his. The "adults" in my life stayed me from getting an ultralight (and the surface winds and topography 'round here make it rather more dangerous than in other flatter, treeless country).

Just keep the d-buggy upright -- you're not even close to quitting yet. And to quote the late Ltn. Gerd Steiger, “No one ever remained upstairs.”

Hals und Beinbruch (good luck -- as offered by pilots of the Luftstreitkrafte), G

P.S. You're spot-on regarding Greywolf
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
353 Posts
Best wishes in your future endevors, sounds like you've had a great run. I guess it's good to know when to say "when...."

I'll be turning 60 next week, and still riding whooped-out sandy Michigan single track. Seems like each year I'm riding the "wee" more and the Honda X less. Making a commitment to try to work back into "dirt-bike" shape this winter, do some mods on the Honda to make it more comfortable and better ergonomically for my stature.

Took a 6,700 mile adventure road trip this summer, Michigan to California and back. 18 states, 5 National Parks, 2 Motorcycle races. Most ambitious trip to date. Still have Alaska and Australia on my bucket list.
 

·
What Kinda Bike Is That?
Joined
·
5,522 Posts
I'm trying to purchase a VW powered Avid Flyer minor project. I've been waiting for a paperwork problem it has with the FAA before I make the move. If it doesn't come through, will get back to work on a long standing project in my shop, a single seat Starduster midget biplane (similar to a Pitts, but a bit more docile) onto which I have hung a 2.2 liter Subaru Legacy engine to replace a 150 hp Lycoming. All the wiring is done aft of the firewall, need to finish wiring forward of the firewall but then have to tear down and recover the entire airframe, a major project for one such as I who is slow and enjoys the work but spends more time admiring what I've just done than doing what needs to be done next.
Thank you for taking the time to answer my question! And, I read your other flying related post a little farther down the thread as well.

I am about to begin work on an airplane myself. I am not a pilot though......yet! I DO agree with you about staying in the "experimental" area to keep costs down. I also feel, that costs can be further reduced if you can build/work on an all metal plane, and/or an airplane with folding wings, (Kitfox).

After about a year of study, my two "favorite" airplanes came down to a Zenith CH-750 STOL aircraft, and a Sonex. Both planes have different mission profiles! But, I could clearly see myself in either one, and thoroughly enjoying them.

This past spring, I stumbled across 4 sets of plans for Steve Wittman's Tailwind plane. I purchased them with the idea of scratch building that design. I decided that, I didn't mind scratch building, but I would prefer to scratch build out of sheet metal instead of tube and fabric, like the Tailwind was created for. I sold the Tailwind plans two weeks ago.

This coming Monday, a set of Sonex plans will land on my doorstep. A fellow was selling them on Barnstormers.com and I caught the ad just shortly after it was posted. I knew a little bit about what needed to be done, behind the scenes, to have the seller transfer the ownership of the plans to me, and I made an offer to him based upon that knowledge. He accepted it! I think I am happier then he might be!

So, with my fingers crossed, my hope is to start scratch building a Sonex this winter! I have been spending the last two weeks cleaning out my basement garage, dragging stuff to work, and selling items that I haven't used in years, or no longer use. It has gotten so, a few coworkers will meet me at the door in the morning, just to see what I am lugging in to sell! Anyway, doing this gets rid of "stuff"; to allow me to rearrange my "motorcycle workspace" into an "airplane workspace". I should be at ground zero by the end of the weekend, so that I can start planning out my floor space.

I am curious about your choice of the Subaru engine for your powerplant. I am thinking along the lines of a VW based engine, or maybe building one of William Wynne's Corvair conversions. An old Lycoming would work too.

Here is a clip of the Sonex in action.

And, one more.

Because you are retired, I know that you won't mind that I just totally hijacked your thread :)biggrinjester:) because, you've got plenty of time for everyone, right?

(Interestingly, I too am single, and my children are grown. If there is a time to do this, it is NOW! I just wish I could do something about getting an airstrip located in my front yard! Oh, and I am working full time though......)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,361 Posts
Godspeed errandboy. The only thing my late father enjoyed more than his bikes was his Piper 4 seater. I spent a lot of time in the copilots seat. We would take off for the beach at a minutes notice. Drove wife number 1 nuts.

It was an IFR plane also. I can remember some dam scarry flights. The man had no fear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I am about to begin work on an airplane myself. I am not a pilot though......yet! I DO agree with you about staying in the "experimental" area to keep costs down. I also feel, that costs can be further reduced if you can build/work on an all metal plane, and/or an airplane with folding wings, (Kitfox).
I’ve never flown a Sonex but have only heard good things about them. Nothing wrong with a properly set up VW aircraft conversion. Their prices represent a huge advantage over aircraft engines. My only complaint about a VW is that their design is very similar to traditional aircraft engines. I prefer Subarus because they’re more modern and utilize water cooling. Water cooling is 30 times better than air cooling. Have you noticed that in the history of motorcycles their biggest jump in performance, reliability, and durability came at the same time that water cooling became common? That’s not a coincidence.

Don’t be afraid of fabric covered airplanes, properly applied, fabric will last for decades, even in the sun, and it doesn’t corrode like metal does. Hail that does serious damage to a fabric covered plane will do even more expensive damage to most metal airplanes.
(It’s cheaper to re-skin a fabric plane than it is a metal one.)

I’m glad to see that you are mostly considering tail dragger airplanes. You are fortunate that you haven’t started flying yet because that gives you the opportunity to take all your training in taildragger (“conventional” landing gear) aircraft. Do not listen to the apologists for tricycle landing gear airplanes. You WILL be a better pilot if you start and stay with taildraggers than you would be if you train in the tricycles. Actually, properly flying a tricycle gear airplane is not that much different than properly flying a taildragger. The difference is you must do it right in a taildragger, the airplane will demand it, but you can be lazy, sloppy and uncoordinated in a trigear and the airplane will forgive you, straighten itself out (on landings) and you will be prevented from getting it right.

Take all your training in taildraggers and the transition to flying a trigear will mainly be learning where the switches are for radios, etc. Learn in a trigear and you will have to almost start over again learning to fly when transitioning to a taildragger... the more time you’ve had in a trigear, the more trouble you will have learning to fly real airplanes, you will have a lot of bad habits to unlearn. While you’re at it, consider some glider lessons, that is some flying that will teach you a lot about flying also.

The simple fact is 98.5% of the most interesting, most fun, most versatile airplanes in the world are taildraggers. It’s not that there are zero worthwhile tricycle gear airplanes... but who can afford to own and operate a P-38?

That said, try not to train in a Citabria, it is one taildragger that is almost a tricycle gear in its behavior. If you must train in a Citabria, get a lot of time in the back seat so you learn to handle it without being able to see what’s in front of you, it will better prepare you for other taildraggers that are blind forward.

And finally, don’t be misled into believing light airplanes are useful as transportation... their only justification is fun. If you MUST be somewhere on a certain day and time, drive or take the airlines, there are cemetaries from coast to coast populated with people that thought light planes were transportation...

Good luck in your aviation foolishness; if you’re ever out New Mexico way give me a call and visit Biplane Ranch near Moriarty.
 

·
What Kinda Bike Is That?
Joined
·
5,522 Posts
I’m glad to see that you are mostly considering tail dragger airplanes. You are fortunate that you haven’t started flying yet because that gives you the opportunity to take all your training in taildragger (“conventional” landing gear) aircraft.
Beautifully, and perfectly written. And, right on the money.

I have started my flying lessons. Last December was my first flight, in a Cessna 150. There are no taildraggers around here, which is what I wanted to learn to fly. "Life" has gotten a little in the way over the summer, and I couldn't afford to continue my lessons, (I only have about 12 hrs anyway. And, no solo either.). But, there is a part of me that DOESN'T want to continue my flight training until I am in the plane that I want to fly. Which would be a taildragger configured airplane; preferably one that I built.

Your messages about tube and fabric being cheaper to reskin, and also fine for sitting out in the sun, are echos of other experienced owner/pilots. Because I do not know of anyone who has done the work, I decided to stick to the medium that closest resembles the work that I currently do, (For 27 years, I have been a yacht carpenter for: Welcome to Hinckley). Sheet aluminum is sort of close to cherry and teak plywood. And, stiffeners and support members are close to cleat stock, and other structural wood timbers to hold the "sheets" we use in boatbuilding, together. I am trying to get the materials that I currently build with during the day, to resemble the materials that I will work with during the nights and weekends. I feel that sheet metal is the match.

I also understand and agree with your message on the Subaru as well. Adding water cooling to a motor is the best way to go. But, it also comes at the cost of adding some weight and complexity to a aviation motor. The Sonex has a useful load of 480 lbs. There is not much to play with there! However, Corvair engines have been mounted in Sonex airplanes, (and have been renamed, "Cleenex" planes! And, the machines literally rip through the air!).

I DO understand that light aircraft are not transportation solutions for their owners. Nor, are motorcycles! I laugh at people when the say to me, "Oh, I bet you save a lot of money on gas by riding your motorcycle." I am the type of rider that will get up on a Saturday morning and decide to go for a cup of coffee on my bike. Three hours later, I have gotten to the place where I decided to get the cup of coffee! If I were driving in my car, it would take me 5 mins to get a cup of coffee. The difference? It is not as much fun in the car, as on the bike to fetch a cup of coffee. How the heck do you think that I put nearly 100,000 miles on my motorcycle since I bought it brand new in the spring of 2007? Lots of fun rides!

Thank you for your input. I know that what you have shared is the truth and that it is coming from a seasoned, experienced pilot. It also supports my own, unseasoned, inexperienced feelings about what I should, and should not do!

If I get up into the air, I will certainly look you up!

Barry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Beautifully, and perfectly written. And, right on the money.

I have started my flying lessons. Last December was my first flight, in a Cessna 150. There are no taildraggers around here, which is what I wanted to learn to fly. "Life" has gotten a little in the way over the summer, and I couldn't afford to continue my lessons, (I only have about 12 hrs anyway. And, no solo either.). But, there is a part of me that DOESN'T want to continue my flight training until I am in the plane that I want to fly. Which would be a taildragger configured airplane; preferably one that I built.

Your messages about tube and fabric being cheaper to reskin, and also fine for sitting out in the sun, are echos of other experienced owner/pilots. Because I do not know of anyone who has done the work, I decided to stick to the medium that closest resembles the work that I currently do, (For 27 years, I have been a yacht carpenter for: Welcome to Hinckley). Sheet aluminum is sort of close to cherry and teak plywood. And, stiffeners and support members are close to cleat stock, and other structural wood timbers to hold the "sheets" we use in boatbuilding, together. I am trying to get the materials that I currently build with during the day, to resemble the materials that I will work with during the nights and weekends. I feel that sheet metal is the match.

I also understand and agree with your message on the Subaru as well. Adding water cooling to a motor is the best way to go. But, it also comes at the cost of adding some weight and complexity to a aviation motor. The Sonex has a useful load of 480 lbs. There is not much to play with there! However, Corvair engines have been mounted in Sonex airplanes, (and have been renamed, "Cleenex" planes! And, the machines literally rip through the air!).

I DO understand that light aircraft are not transportation solutions for their owners. Nor, are motorcycles! I laugh at people when the say to me, "Oh, I bet you save a lot of money on gas by riding your motorcycle." I am the type of rider that will get up on a Saturday morning and decide to go for a cup of coffee on my bike. Three hours later, I have gotten to the place where I decided to get the cup of coffee! If I were driving in my car, it would take me 5 mins to get a cup of coffee. The difference? It is not as much fun in the car, as on the bike to fetch a cup of coffee. How the heck do you think that I put nearly 100,000 miles on my motorcycle since I bought it brand new in the spring of 2007? Lots of fun rides!

Thank you for your input. I know that what you have shared is the truth and that it is coming from a seasoned, experienced pilot. It also supports my own, unseasoned, inexperienced feelings about what I should, and should not do!

If I get up into the air, I will certainly look you up!

Barry
A couple more things and I will shut up. I don't think techniques in metal are all that similar to woodworking, but there's nothing wrong with metal construction and learning the new stuff can be fun as well. However, if you want to find real similarities to your woodworking experience, there are many absolutely fantastic all wood airplanes out there as well. Building any airplane is a pretty big job, it would probably go quite a bit faster for you if you went with a wooden one.

The other thing is, no matter which way you go, absolutely join the EAA, (Experimental Aircraft Association) and hook up with a local chapter. That will be your best bet to meet real aviators and a wealth of usually freely given good advice and expertise. Also you could quite possibly learn of some old crotchety guy that will train you in his taildragger, 90% of modern instructors can't even fly taildraggers. EAA could connect you with someone that could get you in a taildragger. If not, my advice would be save your money until life presents you the opportunity or put it into glider instruction. When I started flying, flying was 85% flying and 15% BS. The modern way is 15% flying and 85% BS.
 

·
What Kinda Bike Is That?
Joined
·
5,522 Posts
The other thing is, no matter which way you go, absolutely join the EAA, (Experimental Aircraft Association) and hook up with a local chapter.
I am already a member of the EAA, and AOPA. The nearest EAA chapter is over an hours drive away for me.

But, I am finding people, such as yourself, who are more inline with what I want to do, and how I want to learn. I will prevail!!!

It is quite possible that I will continue my flight training as a Sport Pilot. The Sonex falls into the ELSA category. The AOPA is very close to convincing the FAA to allow Sport Pilot training to be a contribution, (in flight time), towards a Private Pilot's certificate. As of now, that is not the case. If you hold a Sport Pilot certificate and want a Private Pilot's certificate, you have to start all over again.

I wished I lived closer to your place!

Barry
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Thank you for taking the time to answer my question! And, I read your other flying related post a little farther down the thread as well......


(Interestingly, I too am single, and my children are grown. If there is a time to do this, it is NOW! I just wish I could do something about getting an airstrip located in my front yard! Oh, and I am working full time though......)
I don't know about this gig Black Lab.... that first video leads me to believe you might be going into crop dusting or perhaps barnstorming. (flying under bridges, giving rides at county fairs, racing speeding freight trains... seems a bit sketchy)
If you have purchased a white silk scarf and goggles lately I think you may have the bug.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top