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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I just ordered a 15 front sprocket but because of the "supply chain issues" it won't be here in Saskatoon Sask. until January sometime. Oh well its almost snowing here so thats the end of the bike season and thanks everyone for your help and advice. A 15T it is.
 

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The GSXR600 front sprocket is a 16T and is often recommended to drop the rpm at highway speeds. However the 14T is a better choice, if you have steep inclines / lot of headwind or extremely slow riding to deal with.
Have a look at the figures listed for the different sprocket sizes on https://www.gearingcommander.com. Keeping in mind that these figures are theoretical and logged under ideal riding conditions on well sealed road surfaces.
 

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How many k's on the bike ?, around 60,000 just refresh the clutch. Plates AND springs, gasket that side, coolant and an oil change. The last three are more expensive than the other bits.

The clutches are good for somewhere around 60,000k's and if you are kind to them you won't notice the slip for quite a bit longer.
You are the only Strom owner I have herd say that, I would expect the clutch plates on these bikes to last the life of the motor if the adjustment at the front sprocket has not been stuffed up.

Maybe someone could set up a poll to see just how long they do last ?
 

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Hey, This is my first post here as I just got my Vstrom a few months ago but now I need some advice. My chain and sprockets were shot so I just changed them out. Instead of a 15 on the front I put a 17. I kept the rear sprocket the same as usual. It has dropped my rpm's at 100 kliks from 5,000 to 4,500 so I am happy with that. My only issues is now when I am going down the highway and I gun it it feels and sounds like the clutch plates are slipping and its slow to excellerate. I didn't notice that before I changed to the 17 but to be honest I really didn't gun it too much so my question is: " is the change becuase or related to me putting the 17 on the front or is it just maybe my clutch plates are worn out?" Its a 2009 -650 with approx 50,000 kliks on it. About a month ago I took it out from Sask to BC and put about 4,000 kliks on it and it ran perfect with no problems. What do you think and thanks for your help:)
Rolex has the best idea. The stock gearing of the DL650 is so high the engine can never reach rated rpm in sixth and I believe even in fifth gear...mine (2011) wouldn't. I regeared with the 14 and then 13, but my reason was for off road use. I can now pull 10,000 in sixth gear for about 115 mph indicated easily. Yes, you will have to shift before you clear the intersection, but you will clear the intersection faster. There are some on here that caution about using the 13 due to the lesser number of teeth engaging the chain, and the proximity of the chain to the swing arm at the pivot. I addressed these two concerns with very knowledgeable sources and both informed me it is not a problem. If you desire a slower engine speed at freeway speeds, the 16 is probably the maximum I would consider if that is your goal, but I am very happy with the 13/47 combination.
 

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Going 2 up on the front is pretty much like going 6 down on the rear. Huge difference in gearing. I'm actually surprised that a 17 has room to fit on front. Not sure what gadgetry your model has, but gearing changes can affect the functioning of both the ABS and traction control, if your model has those. I feel most bike have too low of a first gear, but your change...I'm surprised you haven't fried the clutch trying to pull away from a stop.
 

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Going 2 up on the front is pretty much like going 6 down on the rear. Huge difference in gearing. I'm actually surprised that a 17 has room to fit on front. Not sure what gadgetry your model has, but gearing changes can affect the functioning of both the ABS and traction control, if your model has those. I feel most bike have too low of a first gear, but your change...I'm surprised you haven't fried the clutch trying to pull away from a stop.
My 2011 has ABS and I have not noticed any change with the 13/47 gearing. Being a DL means no traction control other than my right hand.
 

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I went from 15 to 16 on my '17 wee and I've been very pleased. It still gets up an goes when I want it, but the drop in RPMs helped when I'm on the highway.
 
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When I changed the chain on my 2006 DL-650 at 21000 miles, I replaced the 15-tooth front sprocket with a 16-tooth sprocket.
At the same time, I took off the rear sprocket and turned it over, because I do not use reverse gear a lot. Consequently, the
other side of the rear sprocket's teeth were fresh and ready for another 21000 miles. I liked the change: lower RPM while
cruising and maybe better gas mileage.

When I changed the chain at 42000 miles, I replaced the 16-tooth sprocket with a 17-tooth sprocket, and got a new stock
rear sprocket. I liked the further reduction in cruising RPM, and it feels to me as if I have the seventh gear that I had occasionally
tried to shift into. When I need lots of acceleration, the appropriate lower gear will furnish plenty of that, so I am totally pleased
with the 17-tooth sprocket up front.

Your mileage may vary. If you are V-Tom, your chains and sprockets last a lot longer than mine, because you take far better
care of them than I do.

Stay warm, and ride when you can enjoy it.
Keith
 

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Grew Wolf mentioned a few years back that know body has reported a fuel saving after adding a tooth the the front including himself, the extra twist on the throttle without the instant extra RPMs means no fuel savings to be had and often the throttle is open more trying to push the bike through the air.

As posted earlier I got a fuel saving and a higher top speed dropping a tooth.
 

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Grew Wolf mentioned a few years back that know body has reported a fuel saving after adding a tooth the the front including himself, the extra twist on the throttle without the instant extra RPMs means no fuel savings to be had and often the throttle is open more trying to push the bike through the air.

As posted earlier I got a fuel saving and a higher top speed dropping a tooth.
[/QUOTE
Grew Wolf mentioned a few years back that know body has reported a fuel saving after adding a tooth the the front including himself, the extra twist on the throttle without the instant extra RPMs means no fuel savings to be had and often the throttle is open more trying to push the bike through the air.

As posted earlier I got a fuel saving and a higher top speed dropping a tooth.
Same here. Faster acceleration too.
 

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Most motorcycles will actually reach a higher top speed and have better fuel economy geared down.
 
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Most motorcycles will actually reach a higher top speed and have better fuel economy geared down.
My change to the 13 up front has not changed my MPG enough to be noticeable. I don't ride the freeway much at all, and I suspect the 13 is not the best choice for that type of riding at 75-80 mph all day long. I would go to a 14 for that, but definitely not stay at the stock 15/47. To each his own.
 

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It would be very noticeable if you have a slipping clutch.

Ride along in say 3rd gear around 5000 rpm, and then quickly go to full throttle, if the tach suddenly goes way up, inappropriately compared to the speedometer, you have your answer.
On the plus side, bike clutches are quick and easy to change, not like a cars. If you ever do have to change it, make sure that you get a new clutch basket as well, they are usually grooved up badly, and no point putting new plates and steels in a worn basket.
Make sure that your clutch lever has enough freeplay, and check it also turned as far as possible in both directions, and while riding that you aren't subconsciously pulling it in a little bit. Its no different than people who ride the clutch pedal in their cars.
 

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They need more than just free play at the lever.

They have a second adjustment down by the front sprocket on the Wee, it also needs some free play at the push rod.

I don't change the basket I just knock down the high spots with a file.

On my farm & MX bikes I don't even remove the basket to do it I just lay the bike on it's left side.
 

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On my 05 650(122,000 mi. when sold) I ran a 16 tooth more often than the 15. The 16 always required more downshifting in areas that were below 65 mph. 15 was much better around town and FS roads. 14 would be best for FS roads, but was never tried by me.
Then at 110K I installed a 680 kit(13 to1 comp.) and suddenly the 16 tooth seemed the best choice as the extra power meant way less downshifting. Wonder if the 17+ models with a bit more power would handle a 16 better.
 

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Since my Strom is used for local and highway commuting daily and not taken off-road, I long ago found the 16T front sprocket (instead of the stock 15T) ideal. I have a 45T rear sprocket in the parts box but rarely use it, preferring the stock 47T. With the 16/45 setup Though I like the lower RPM at 80 MPH, I find at speeds of 60 MPH or up hills I need to drop a gear to accelerate as smartly as I usually would. Not a big deal, that takes a tiny split second. But the 45T rear also means that I run out of chain adjustment play and must press out a link fewer than stock so the chain will fit properly. I don't have one but I'd suspect a 16/46 setup would be ideal for my higher speed riding with a lower RPM. But as usual Gray Wolf (RIP) was correct; I won't glean any h fuel economy savings, and top speed would only be increased down a hill, with a tail wind
 

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On my 2012 650 I have run 15, 16, 17 tooth front-stock rear. I have NO idea what a bike pulling to redline in top gear has to do with perfect gearing. I have a couple rather powerful vehicles that won't come close to going faster in top gear than a lower gear.
What is not brought up in motorcycle conversation is the aerodynamic factor. They are bricks so wanting to run 140 mph isn't happening on these anyway.
I kept a fuel mileage record. There may, or may not have been, a few tenths of one mile per US gallon improvement in fuel mileage with the 16 and 17 t front sprockets. Certainly did not lower fuel economy, or raise it according to my records. You just cannot prove the difference due to weather and road conditions. I only ran the 17 for maybe 1000 miles for instance.
If you actually ride off pavement a lot then the 15 ( or 14 for true hardcore dirt roads and paths ) is the way to go. For pavement, even just backroads, I would never go back to a 15 t over the 16t. Bike just works better, and the speedometer is almost perfectly accurate with the gps with a 16t. The ONLY negative would be the initial take off from a stop, there is a bit more clutch feathering. No, I am quite sure my clutch is not getting undue wear....
The 16 makes the gears feel like they fit the engine better once moving. It accelerates just as fast as before. Yes it does...as I may still be in 2nd gear while a 15t rider is already in 3rd and I have a rear wheel torque advantage there.
You can try a 16, or 17, with the stock length chain. You MUST loosen the chain and take it off the front sprocket TOWARDS the engine casing!!! That gives room for the sprocket to come off.
 

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Just to throw another comment in, how well a bike handles different gear ratios depends a lot on where the engine makes torque. If I recall, the 2017+ 650 makes more torque at lower RPMs than the earlier versions, making it better suited to higher gearing...
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Well I got my 15T front sprocket in and put it on but now its winter in Sask and no more riding. So I tried a 17T and I didn't really like it so I went back to a 15T. I think next time I will try a 16T and see how that goes. I know this is a hard question to answer but approx how long does a chain and sprocket last on a 2009 - 650 V-Strom. I bought good quality parts and didn't cheap out and I am not hard on my bike at all. The gentleman that I bought the bike off of said he had changed the gears and chain around 25,000 kliks and when I changed it it had 45,000 klis so it lasted 20,000 kliks or 12,000 miles? Does that sound right?
 
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