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Discussion Starter #1
Supposedly this is when lots of riders relax and start to ride above their head.

Today I was sort of reminded of the danger of riding when I was trying to merge to the left on a three lane highway and a guy in a car in the other lane refused to let me over. I needed to get over to make my turn all the way to the left.

Well, the guy kept speeding up so I just put my arm out to let him know I was going and went for it, well, the guy rode my ass in anger until I continued into the next lane.

Lesson learned. Lots of people do not care. They will kill you and ponder it later. Me making a move like that in a car is one thing, on a bike is a completely different story. I take responsibility and next time, I will just go down the highway and turn around. Just not worth it.
 

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Yah, know, when I know I'm going to make a lane change or major direction change, I move over a mile or so before the event.
If you are making last minute changes due to convenience, I have no sympathy.
Ride your own ride...carefully.
 

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Some cagers are ragers, some are just plain dangerous! Agree it is best to avoid the type-A holes whenever possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yah, know, when I know I'm going to make a lane change or major direction change, I move over a mile or so before the event.
If you are making last minute changes due to convenience, I have no sympathy.
Ride your own ride...carefully.
I am not disagreeing with you, but I will say it was a quick change from turning onto the highway to having to to turn left on the other side.
 

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Supposedly this is when lots of riders relax and start to ride above their head.

Today I was sort of reminded of the danger of riding when I was trying to merge to the left on a three lane highway and a guy in a car in the other lane refused to let me over. I needed to get over to make my turn all the way to the left.

Well, the guy kept speeding up so I just put my arm out to let him know I was going and went for it, well, the guy rode my ass in anger until I continued into the next lane.

Lesson learned. Lots of people do not care. They will kill you and ponder it later. Me making a move like that in a car is one thing, on a bike is a completely different story. I take responsibility and next time, I will just go down the highway and turn around. Just not worth it.
Lack of planning & observation caused you to attempt a move that should not have been done. We have all done it and it is a good thing that you recognized your mistake. Next ride, concentrate on studying the traffic flow/pattern around you during your normal scan for threats. Note things like cars following too closely(common) and others that are leaving a larger safety margin. When they are stacked up like nascar drivers drafting at Daytona I either slow or speed up and work my way away from them. Watch for the guy in a big hurry coming up behind you and get out of his way. If you know you have to exit, advanced planning and execution is needed so that you don't disrupt the stream of traffic.
Seamlessly working around and through traffic takes a bit of energy, but it's really a nice challenge to see how smooth you can actually do it. I also like to watch other riders to pick out their errors, or marvel at how well they work with the traffic around them. It's usually the former, but the latter are a marvel and sometimes I learn something new.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Lack of planning & observation caused you to attempt a move that should not have been done. We have all done it and it is a good thing that you recognized your mistake. Next ride, concentrate on studying the traffic flow/pattern around you during your normal scan for threats. Note things like cars following too closely(common) and others that are leaving a larger safety margin. When they are stacked up like nascar drivers drafting at Daytona I either slow or speed up and work my way away from them. Watch for the guy in a big hurry coming up behind you and get out of his way. If you know you have to exit, advanced planning and execution is needed so that you don't disrupt the stream of traffic.
Seamlessly working around and through traffic takes a bit of energy, but it's really a nice challenge to see how smooth you can actually do it. I also like to watch other riders to pick out their errors, or marvel at how well they work with the traffic around them. It's usually the former, but the latter are a marvel and sometimes I learn something new.
Very well said. It was simple stupidity on my part. I think I was riding like I was in a car. Too relaxed.

Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk
 

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There is no real end to the learning we all have to do is there. I felt I was an expert, or at least competent after 6 months, but realized after 2 years that was not true.

These days I am impressed that I can put the bike away for 4 months and when I get back on it only takes a couple of rides to feel back to where I was. It used to take a lot longer.

Up here I find most people help bikers when they can, but there are always the idiots, maybe they just lost their job, or divorced, or something else is making them miserable and they have no tolerance for bikers. Stay clear of those people when you spot them, pull over, slow down, whatever you need to do to get clear of them.
 

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I suggest tip-top maintenance, really good protective gear, and continue training. I learn something every time I go out. I also keep reading and figure out more better stuff on gear and on the bike. Being curious and engaged really helps a bunch. The mental game is also crucial.

It's like ocean swimming - I have never been annoyed at marine predators. They're just out there. When something big swims by between me and the shore, I'm polite and calmly head in well behind the guy. Just like with bikes, I haven't been bumped very often that way!

On learning handling, I ran across this video and it's changing my riding: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ZFdxEWpefI

On gear, get the really good stuff and maintain it. Add to it every once and a while.

Learn what you need to be comfortable physically. Take water, snacks.

Upgrade and compact your trauma kit. Put a big tag outside on the bag with it in saying "trauma kit"

Keep learning your bike. My VStrom has 72000 miles now and I just read about this silly 2 mm offset on the drive train. Yup, it's in there. So I have to fix that. I realized yesterday that my other bike has a larger grip, found some nice cork tape, wrapped the grips, perfect!

Stay curious, stay interested, and develop that super 360 tracking of everything, and a sense of exactly how long it will take to turn and stop and evade.

Lot's to do, lot's of fun. Don't make yourself dull.
 

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I tend to look at the driver, not the car. Usually they will then allow me to blend where I need to, although some seem to drive with blinkers on. Those are the ones to be wary of.
On high density multi-laned roads I turn on my indicator but make no move to push in and the third if not the first car will make room for me. A wave is good. There are some idiots but most people will respond to a polite request. Nobody likes to be pushed around.
 

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I needed to get over to make my turn all the way to the left.
This is the danger we all face from cagers, their perceived need turns in to a right. The concept of driving to the nex exit or turnaround and doubling back a bit is inconceivable and I've seen some absolutely frightening incidents, especially in college towns.
 

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Great observations and willingness to share Cavenger.

Want some fun - ride in the Philippines.. haha.. obstacles in the road (including people), dogs, motorbikes passing on all sides, crowding into intersections on the yellow, passing in your lane, lol.. it's a treat. That said, I have NEVER experienced an issue of road rage there. They just don't have the EGO for it like people do here. What you experience here, and what is so dangerous, is a lot of EGO telling someone that you got the better of them, or harmed them in some way. It's unbelievable, because of course you didn't mean to do that. But we Westerners have an EGO that won't quit.

I have a few rules that have served me well over 40 years:

Always drive with an understanding of behaviors and constantly scan all lanes, all intersections, and basically all possible points of conflict. You cannot get lost in your thoughts on a motorcycle or you will pay for it. You get so you recognize a head move before the blinker goes on for a lane change. If this guy moves left, where will I go? If you're upset or distracted, take the cage.

On highways I try to always be moving slightly faster than surrounding traffic, preferably in the left lane, so the events are unfolding IN FRONT of me, not BEHIND. And I don't have to deal with merging traffic. You cannot effectively monitor what is happening behind you, but you can in front. It is easy to be run over if you're going too slow. I have had at least two CHP validate this concept with me, and no they didn't write me a ticket that day.

I ALWAYS have a way out and I am constantly verifying that it still is.. Never allow yourself to get boxed in. If you do, rectify the situation immediately. I have had to use the shoulder on more than one occasion, in fact it doesn't bother me to do so. I am around them before they even see me. People are so distracted.

Do not piss people off. Ever. It doesn't pay. No matter how much your EGO wants the satisfaction, remember that their EGO will take over and they will not remain rational. They are piloting a weapon. If someone comes after you do not hesitate to split lanes to peel them off. It is your life at stake.

Lastly, do your best to drive professionally, and reward ANY good behavior on the part of a cager with a wave. It acknowledges their effort, however minimal, and mainly reinforces their EGO as to their behavior.

Enjoy that big machine Cavenger.
 

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The ONLY thing that matters is that you get home safely after every ride. Nothing else really matters. Let jerks be jerks. You be the better (smarter) person.

Take some advanced rider training. There will be some in your region. Not a track day. Some training on how to better control a motorcycle using better technique. The MSF advanced course is pretty good. I've had much better training from the Lee Parks Total Control training and a local training school with technique training on a road race track. Not speed training, technique training. Local outfits here also offer traffic training. Pick one a year and do it!
 

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My first few years of riding up in Spokane, I made it an annual event to secure some form of refresher rider training in the spring. It's good to review the basics and work on new skills, get your mind right, etc. Then I began taking cornering school at a local race track in the summers. What a blast, and what an improvement to the most important component on the bike...me! Riding needs to become a natural extension of yourself and your mindset. Spending less money on farkles and gear and more on training worked for me and continues to work...ride safe.
 

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Great observations and willingness to share Cavenger.

Want some fun - ride in the Philippines.. haha.. obstacles in the road (including people), dogs, motorbikes passing on all sides, crowding into intersections on the yellow, passing in your lane, lol.. it's a treat. That said, I have NEVER experienced an issue of road rage there. They just don't have the EGO for it like people do here. What you experience here, and what is so dangerous, is a lot of EGO telling someone that you got the better of them, or harmed them in some way. It's unbelievable, because of course you didn't mean to do that. But we Westerners have an EGO that won't quit.

I have a few rules that have served me well over 40 years:

Always drive with an understanding of behaviors and constantly scan all lanes, all intersections, and basically all possible points of conflict. You cannot get lost in your thoughts on a motorcycle or you will pay for it. You get so you recognize a head move before the blinker goes on for a lane change. If this guy moves left, where will I go? If you're upset or distracted, take the cage.

On highways I try to always be moving slightly faster than surrounding traffic, preferably in the left lane, so the events are unfolding IN FRONT of me, not BEHIND. And I don't have to deal with merging traffic. You cannot effectively monitor what is happening behind you, but you can in front. It is easy to be run over if you're going too slow. I have had at least two CHP validate this concept with me, and no they didn't write me a ticket that day.

I ALWAYS have a way out and I am constantly verifying that it still is.. Never allow yourself to get boxed in. If you do, rectify the situation immediately. I have had to use the shoulder on more than one occasion, in fact it doesn't bother me to do so. I am around them before they even see me. People are so distracted.

Do not piss people off. Ever. It doesn't pay. No matter how much your EGO wants the satisfaction, remember that their EGO will take over and they will not remain rational. They are piloting a weapon. If someone comes after you do not hesitate to split lanes to peel them off. It is your life at stake.

Lastly, do your best to drive professionally, and reward ANY good behavior on the part of a cager with a wave. It acknowledges their effort, however minimal, and mainly reinforces their EGO as to their behavior.

Enjoy that big machine Cavenger.

This is an excellent thread.
I agree; the rider's MINDSET is a primary factor in determining how many risky situations "vs. cagers" they'll encounter during their ride.
Once a rider realizes they will almost surely get the worse end of the bargain in any conflict with another vehicle, the ego quickly becomes humbled.
There are some cagers, especially in the cities who DO NOT GIVE A F* about you, and you'll be hard pressed to convince them otherwise.

I like the two guidelines:
1) Leave yourself and out
2) Ride within your abilities

And I guess to go along with it:
3) Treat others how you'd like to be treated

Maybe, just maybe, if I can exhibit behavior as a motorcyclist that is respectful and courteous to other drivers, they'll in return be the same to the next one they encounter down the road.
 

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Supposedly this is when lots of riders relax and start to ride above their head.

Today I was sort of reminded of the danger of riding when I was trying to merge to the left on a three lane highway and a guy in a car in the other lane refused to let me over. I needed to get over to make my turn all the way to the left.
I think some it comes after you settle in with your bike, you start using some of the new to you capabilities. With that "experimentation" comes additional risk. I know that a lot of folks sneer at the Wee for acceleration but it's a quick lil sumbitch. That has emboldened me on some issues such as you describe that the quickness can get you out of a jam. I've made myself practice a bit more patience which is one of the virtues that will keep you alive.
 

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Yah, know, when I know I'm going to make a lane change or major direction change, I move over a mile or so before the event.
If you are making last minute changes due to convenience, I have no sympathy.
Ride your own ride...carefully.
My pet frippin peeve. These assholes in Texas will wait til the last minute to change lanes and turn on their signal - if at all - at the exact instant they are in the process of turning.
WTH? Weren't they taught to signal a requisite distance *before* turning? It's a warning - not a footnote.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The ONLY thing that matters is that you get home safely after every ride. Nothing else really matters. Let jerks be jerks. You be the better (smarter) person.

Take some advanced rider training. There will be some in your region. Not a track day. Some training on how to better control a motorcycle using better technique. The MSF advanced course is pretty good. I've had much better training from the Lee Parks Total Control training and a local training school with technique training on a road race track. Not speed training, technique training. Local outfits here also offer traffic training. Pick one a year and do it!
Thank you for this! I see that they have a training class in Nashville this summer which would make a good little adventure for me along with the huge benefits.
 
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