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Discussion Starter #1
I typed a very long, elequent beautiful post and my stupid work computer decided to shut itself down.

Here's the very short summary.

Had Anakees. Liked them. Started to ride more dirt.

TKC rear. Like it. Not enough grip in rain. Started to commute 500 mi/week.

Shinko 712 rear. Good grip on dry. Good grip on wet. Definately better than TKCs for everything except dirt. Had it for 1500 miles now, lots of rain.
Hydroplaned 3 times on it so far, going straight, 65-75mph, steady speed. Nearly crashed once. Nearly died. Bad.

Is it the tire? Bike? Pressure? Me? Higher pressure=less grip but less likely to hydroplane?

Front Anakee still looks great at 15,000 miles. No problems with grip or Hydro.

Do I need treads/sipes that cross the centerline?
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Living the Stereotype
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Have you considered possibly slowing down in the rain?
 

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I'm going to try Battlewings on my DL1000 very soon now. I got a Transalp for off road...

My original Trailwings now have 6300 kms and the rear is getting close to the wearbars. Front looks ok, but I'm changing the pair anyway.
 

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It's a LOT harder to make the more dirt orientated tires hydroplane. The catch is - they generally have less grip otherwise in the rain - less contact patch.

Your call - less grippy generally, but more less prone to going postal, or more grip and sudden , unexpected, surprises.

That said, you can hydroplane any tire if the conditions are right.

Pete
 

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Lets be sure it's hydroplaning we're talking about rather than wet traction. Hydroplaning will cause control loss at high speed over standing water while moving straight ahead because the tire rides on top of water and loses ground contact. The round profile of a motorcycle tire is not prone to hydroplaning. The profile cuts through standing water regardless of tread design much better than a flat bottomed car/truck tire. A TKC knobby is very difficult to hydroplane. It's wet traction is awful though.
 

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While I've no experience with either of those other tires, I'm running Tourance EXPs and their wet-grip has been GREAT! Springtime in 'Bama can get pretty moist and so far, so good. Gotta agree with StrominNroman though...it pays to just slow down in inclement weather. Ride safe, ride often. :cool:
 

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all this talk of TKCs not being that good in the rain is reinforcing my decision to got with Karoo Ts instead even though they are a bit more expensive.

the Karoo Ts are better than stock trailwings in the rain and every bit as good as the other tires I have tried so far, Maxxis Detours, D-607s & Conti Road Attacks.

I only run Karoo Ts during winter months and switch to a less agressive tire after mud season. I'm still looking for the 10,000 mile rear tire for the Vee, Trail Attacks are the next experiment



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I have run both trailwings and tourances on my Vee so far. I thought new the Tourance were better tire in the rain but once they got below 60% tread they suck. Very skittish on wet roads. The trail wings weren't the best tires but they seemed to hold the same characteristics all the way through the life of the tire. They held up longer for me as well.
Due for another back tire now and haven't decided what I am going with this time yet. Might try the shinko's just for the low price.
Matt
 

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Without knowing more about the situation, I tend to agree that you probably experienced a loss of traction and not hydroplaning.

I think hydroplaning is possible if there is significant standing water on the roadway.

75mph sounds a little fast in the wet, especially if it is heavy rain. Trying to stop quickly from 75mph in the wet is scary as well.
 

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Without knowing more about the situation, I tend to agree that you probably experienced a loss of traction and not hydroplaning.

I think hydroplaning is possible if there is significant standing water on the roadway.

75mph sounds a little fast in the wet, especially if it is heavy rain. Trying to stop quickly from 75mph in the wet is scary as well.
It is possible to hydroplane at quite low speeds and with off-road tires. I managed it once on a TS-185 at 100kph with trials tires on - the water I hit was about 8" deep though (Why are all those cars parked at the side of the --- Oh shiiiiiiiiiiit) and fortunately the front just skimmed over the top of the water - if it'd dug in it'd have been ugly.



Pete
 

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the easiest way to tell...

is if you have to change your underwear immediately after -- then you know you hydroplaned.

;)
 

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Living the Stereotype
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Living the Stereotype
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btw this isn't the weenie forum, Vees don't have abs

Ooops, my bad.

Moderator, please delete my previous post.

And this one while you're at it.
 

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What kind of road are you commuting on in the rain? Is it possible you are hitting some residue from heavy commuting? I'm taking oil and/or other crap from cars & trucks.

I have stock TWs and regularly do 70+ in the rain with no problems. In fact, until I read this post, I never even thought twice about it. I bet this coming week I will run a tad bit slower though. . .
 
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