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If you're looking to change your brake pads, but aren't sure what's involved- look no further. This is a pad replacement on an '02 DL1000, which has 20,000 miles and probably the original pads.
Old pad/New pad

If you are removing the front wheel to replace tires or for some other reason, it is a good idea to check the condition of your pads. Think about timing your wheel removal for the same time as your brake pads, since it requires removing the calipers to get the wheel off anyway.
FRONT:
Tools you will need:
14mm socket
needlenose pliers or small screwdriver
C-clamp

First, remove these two bolts that hold the caliper on:


Don't let the caliper hang by the hose for any length of time:


turn the freed caliper over in your hand and look for the small cotter pin. You'll need a small screwdriver or needlenose pliers to remove this pin:


Once the cotter pin is out, it is possible to remove the pin that holds in the pads. It should slide out easily:


Once the pin is out, it is easy to unhook the pads from the pin that keeps them in the caliper.
At this point, you'll want to remove the master cylinder cover and cap, and place a rag or absorbant something over the opening. Use your C-clamp againt the old pad to gently and evenly push the pistons back into the caliper. This gives enough room for the new, thicker pads to slide over the rotor when its time to re-install.



Here's the time to slow down a bit. The back of the old pads had a metal shim. Remove this shim and place it onto the back of the new pad. I like to put a bit of Disk Brake Grease between the pad and shim, and where the shim meets the pistons:



Now just rest the pads inside the caliper, they can only go in one way, and slide the pin back in. I like to put a tiny bit of grease on this pin, as well.

Rotate the pin so you can find the hols the cotter pin goes thru, the cotter pin can only go in one way, too.
Now just slide the caliper over the rotor, and bolt back to the fork. The book recommends about 28 ft lbs on the caliper mounting bolts.
 

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coonass

Thanks for the tutorial... now that I am put out to pasture I have lots of time and not too much $$, With your help I'll change the pads myself.. Most helpful..
 

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I just did this last night. Very easy.

Q: why remove the master cylinder cover?

Also, for what it's worth I didn't need a C-clamp - just firm finger pressure was needed to compress the pistons.
 

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I just did this last night. Very easy.

Q: why remove the master cylinder cover?

Also, for what it's worth I didn't need a C-clamp - just firm finger pressure was needed to compress the pistons.
I found the same on my 650. Much easier than on a car.

Also, I found it to be a huge PITA to re-install the front wheel, because it involved trying to hold the wheel in the air with 1 hand, wedge the right-side bracket in with my 2nd hand, wedge the speed sensor in place with my 3rd hand (since the wire is way too short to be inserted into the hub until JUST before it gets to the fork), and a 4th hand to insert the axle.

If they had made my speed sensor wire about 1" longer, I'd have been able to slap it into the hub before I tried to line the wheel up the fork, and the job would have been MUCH easier.

DL1k may be different.
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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I found the same on my 650. Much easier than on a car.

Also, I found it to be a huge PITA to re-install the front wheel, because it involved trying to hold the wheel in the air with 1 hand, wedge the right-side bracket in with my 2nd hand, wedge the speed sensor in place with my 3rd hand (since the wire is way too short to be inserted into the hub until JUST before it gets to the fork), and a 4th hand to insert the axle.

If they had made my speed sensor wire about 1" longer, I'd have been able to slap it into the hub before I tried to line the wheel up the fork, and the job would have been MUCH easier.

DL1k may be different.
Don't try to hold the wheel in the air. Use wedges to do the work for you. The installation is very easy that way.

 

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It looks like the original pads had quite a bit of life left in them.
 

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I've often resorted to using my foot to elevate the front wheel enough to get the axle installed......It looks bizarre from people walking by, but really, you only need a good foot, and a bit 'o luck.

Also, did you inspect your pins for galling? If so, how did you address this?
 

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It looks like the original pads had quite a bit of life left in them.
+1

Aren't the little "V" markings you can see when the pad is on edge, the wear indicators? As long as they are there you have pad life???
 

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You left out the part about the bit of oil and wirebrush work on the c-clamp.

The old pads are OK down to 1 mm thickness of friction material.

Thanks for the write up. After the calipers are reinstalled with Loctite on the bolt threads, the brake lever needs to be squeezed several times to position the pads against the discs, and the brake fluid level checked.* It is indeed a truly interesting experience to take on of the first ride with new pads without squeezing them against the disc first! New pads need a break in, so brake gently, then moderately several times before you might have a need for max braking.

*It is normal for the brake fluid level to drop as the pads wear. More fluid is residing in the calipers and less in the reservoir as the friction material wears down. The fluid level with somewhat worn brakes doesn't need to be at the top of the bulls-eye window, and should be up there with new pads. All brake fluids of the same DOT category are more alike than different and can be mixed. Don't be hyped by "synthetic" on the label...all are synthetic; there is nothing natural about polyglycol ether. DOT4 fluid is right for our brakes. Always buy the smallest bottles of fluid and use a new, sealed bottle when flushing the brakes.
 

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i changed pads before . . . i think . . my memory is failing me (which is really sad considering my age) . . but it was like five years ago on an Intruder.

This thread reassured me that I should be able to accomplish this with my limited motorcycle maintenance abilities . .. . although i do not currently own any loctite. . hmmm

. . . still think i'll invite my R1 buddy over who constantly is tearing apart/reassembling/upgrading his bike
 

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Unless you need the wheel off for some other reason, like a tire change, there's no need to.

I don't use loctite on the caliper bolts, but maybe I should.
 

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Thanks for the great how-to guide.

I have a 2010 DL650, and few questions, since I'm a moto maintenance newbie.

1. How do I figure out which pads fit my motorcycle?

For example, I can go to aviciouscycle.ca, filter by bike, and then by category=brake. I can see some EBC pads and some Galfer pads there.

For example, here are the Galfer pads:
Galfer-FD134G Brake Pads - Aviciouscycle.ca
Galfer-FD174G Brake Pads - Aviciouscycle.ca
Galfer-FD179G Brake Pads - Aviciouscycle.ca

It doesn't say which is which (rear? front left? front right?).

I'm not asking "which pads should I use?", I'm asking "where and how can I look up which pads I can use?"

2. As far as I can see, the front end of the DL650 has 2 rotors, 2 calipers, 2 sets of brake pads. This guide covers the replacement of what looks like the front right set of pads. Is the procedure identical for the other side?

I'm sure I'll have more questions soon. Thanks!
 

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FD134G is the rear.

The others are fronts and you need to replace both if you are doing the front. In that case, you can compare them to the old parts.
 

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PTRider;715262 The old pads are OK down to 1 mm thickness of friction material. [/QUOTE said:
I love this site! :bom_love: I have looked everywhere for the service thickness for the front brake pads with no luck, and here it is! :thumbup:

Dave
 

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Just did mine this morning. Somehow I managed not to screw it up. Took about 2 hours. Had to stop and get brake grease. I think next time I could do it in 1/2 hour. Suprisingly no glitches.
 

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Performed this service on my '07 Wee a couple of weekends ago.
Decided to take care of this operation myself as these instructions made it appear that even a non-mechanic like myself could deal with it..And happily it was true.

Only glitch: One of the cotter pins decided to fly off into space rather than slide neatly into place when reinstalling. Miraculously, the little thing reappeared amongst the gravel at the side of the road before I had to try sweeping the area with some magnets, (and pray). Be careful with those things. Something like that can really ruin your day!
 

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Better than Dominos! Front pads installed in less than 30 minutes. Thanks for the time saving tips!
 

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'06 DL650. I'm re-installing the front wheel (new tire). Is there suppose to be any kind of spacer between the right side fork leg and the wheel?. Of course the speedo is on the left side. Thanks!
 

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Old old thread but just tried replacing my front pads, removed the little cotter pin but that brake pad pin that's supposed to slide out will not move on either front caliper, why couldn't they have made them screw in like most other bikes!!
 
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