StromTrooper banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Is the headlight plastic or glass?

I would like to remove scratches on the headlight, but do not know what product to use. I mainly need to know if the headlight covering is plastic or glass, then I can try to research a product; but if anyone has recommendations on what product to use, or how to remove the scratches this would be helpful also!
 
D

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
It's plastic. All headlight lenses on vehichles are now a days. Good luck, there are no real fixes I know of. Lots of claims, not sure if they work or not.

People ask this about lenses in their glasses all the time (I'm an optometrist). Fortunately for us, there's nothing that works...and unfortunately for them :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
Since we have an optometrist here (and sorry for changing the topic; we can talk about plastic scratches too), but how good are the face shields (and glasses) that now claim to provide transitions between differing light conditions? Is it really possible to have just one shield (or glasses) that you can use at night and in bright sunlight and that also give UV protection?

Bob
 
D

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Bob, I have not really looked into photochromic (technical name) face shields for helmets, so I cannot give you much insight there. I believe most shields are made of poly(carbonate) and until recently, maybe 4 years +/-, transitions (brand name of plastic photochromic lenses for your glasses) were not available for poly. We now can put transitions in poly, though, so I don't see why it couldn't be put in a shield.

Transitions lenses have been continuously updated and improved in the last 15 or so years. They are now almost, but not quite as good as the old/original photochromic, glass photogrey. I mean they don't quite darken as much as the old photogrey lenses but are close. They do lighten indoors or at night as much or more than photogreys to nearly 100% clear. IMO, neither is as dark or comfortable to wear as a pure sun lens that is dark all the time.

Up until this year I wore a 3/4 helmet and wrap around type glasses with transitions lenses in them, so I was good to go in sunlight or dark. I've switched to a full face this year and now just carry a separate pair of sunglasses (I prefer grey polaroid lenses) if it is real bright. If a person wore prescription glasses, I suppose you could wear transitions under a FF helmet, however, I'm not sure how well they would darken in sunlight with the shield closed. You must keep in mind the mode of action of any photochroic lens, it needs direct UV exposure to darken the lens. If your shield blocks a significant %age of the UV, and it probably does, you won't get as much darkening of the lens under it. Same thing happens in a car, unless you drive a convertible :)

Whew, sorry for the long-winded reply, hope that helps.

Gary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
That does help. I'm pretty sure I'm about due for a new pair of glasses and have been thinking about what type to get. I'm real tempted to buy two pair this time, one for reading and one for riding and skipping the whole bifocal thing.

Bob
 
P

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Bob said:
That does help. I'm pretty sure I'm about due for a new pair of glasses and have been thinking about what type to get. I'm real tempted to buy two pair this time, one for reading and one for riding and skipping the whole bifocal thing.
Bob
Went to an optometrist last year and spent big bucks for lineless progressive lenses - both clear, and sunglasses. Had optical insurance at the time - these were very expensive. Verilux lenses, or something like that... Total cost was around $1000 ($300 or so out of my pocket). Tried to get used to them for about two months. Couldn't stand using them with a PC monitor. Couldn't walk down stairs safely while wearing them. My wife was scared to ride with me while driving the car. I stopped in a convenience store to get something to drink one day. Looked at all the drink bottles in the cooler displays, and they were HUGE! I was disgusted - I just wanted a drink, not a bath! Then I took my glasses off. The bottles were regular size.... :shock:

Went home and tossed the expensive glasses up on my closet shelf. They have stayed there. Went to Walgreens and bought two sets of bifocal reading glasses - one in sunglasses, one clear. Top of the lenses have no magnification (my distance vision is OK), bottom bifocal part is a reading glass lens (+225). Bought an additional set of weaker reading glasses to use with the PC monitor. Total cost - under $20. Love 'em. They work fine for me.

The sad thing is that I had explained to the optometrist that I had tried lineless bifocals a few years back, and could not adapt to them. I also explained that I found them particularly bad for PC use because of the relatively narrow field of magnification - I could not take in the entire screen at a glance. I also explained that I spent a LOT of time in front of a PC monitor. So... he went ahead and talked me into what HE wanted to sell me. And I consider that, at best, to be extremely unprofessional.
 
D

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Paul, it's unfortunate you had a poor expeience. Try not to generalize to all of us. You would have been dispensed glasses much differently in my office. #1 any person previously unsuccessful with progressive lenses (they can be difficult) doesn't get one unless they ask for it and #2 anyone who spends at least half their day in fron of a computer gets offered single vision lenses prescribed for the distance they sit from the screen.

Sorry for the tangent, guys.
 
P

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
DooFighter said:
Paul, it's unfortunate you had a poor expeience. Try not to generalize to all of us. You would have been dispensed glasses much differently in my office. #1 any person previously unsuccessful with progressive lenses (they can be difficult) doesn't get one unless they ask for it and #2 anyone who spends at least half their day in fron of a computer gets offered single vision lenses prescribed for the distance they sit from the screen.
Yes, I know that there are exceptions. But this wasn't the first time for me. There seem to be a lot of optical shops that simply push their highest profit products - too many of them. A couple of experiences like that, and a customer like myself gets very turned off toward the profession. I'm sure you can understand that. Makes it very tough for the guys like yourself who are trying to do a good job.

I had an independent optometrist that I trusted back in Connecticut for the past few years. But I had moved to another area of the country, and also had to go to a place that accepted the optical insurance that I had at the time. I think those circumstances set me up for a bad experience.

We should probably let this exchange drop, since it is off-topic for the forum. But we did have a member considering new glasses, and if he goes into the process with a bit of caution, that is to his advantage. I apologize if it seemed pointed toward you - that certainly wasn't my intent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
I use "Plexus" brand plastic cleaner protectant & polish on my windscreens. I picked it up at the dealer's. You've probably tried something like this, though, but if not, then you might try it first.

Another idea (this may be a bit off the wall) - I had to take a son's watch into the jeweler's because the crystal (actually, plastic) was badly scuffed. It came back looking as clear as new. I'm not sure what they used to take out the scratches, but I could find out.

Any jewelers on the board?

Richard
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
441 Posts
scratch repair

Believe it or not, scratches can be sanded out. With the advice of Kurt Lammon, who is a guru of plastic repair in the automotive collision repair industry, I attempted to return a dull scratched tail light lens on my daughter's car to new condition. It was badly oxidized and had a few nasty scratches on it. (Kurt is a friend and the author of How To Repair Plastic Bodywork published by Whitehorse Press)

No secret to it. I started with 220 grit sandpaper (ONLY IF YOU NEED TO START WITH SOMETHING THAT EXTREMELY COARSE TO GET OUT THE BIGGEST SCRATCH. SAVE YOURSELF A LOT OF WORK AND ONLY START WITH THE FINEST GRIT YOU CAN GET AWAY WITH) and I used 8 or 10 progressively finer grits all the way up to 2000, yes 2000! You can't even feel the grit on this stuff. It's some kind of fine. Then polishing preferably with a power buffer but it can be done by hand too, using polishing compound. You know, that DuPont stuff in the little green can. This essentially ground down the plastic to a new shiny surface, slightly lower than the original surface of the plastic. It takes some elbow grease but it works just fine. Just be ready to finish it once you start. Obviously this wouldn't work on an optical lens because it would change the refraction but for lighting it shouldn't matter.

Oh, and the tail light lens came out looking like a new one. Very cool.

Kurt's company Urethane Supply Company makes some neat plastic repair tools and supplies as well. They sell an inexpensive little kit that allows you to actually repair cracks and HOLES in light lenses of red, clear, and amber color. I have tried them and they really work. Beats having to buy a whole new light.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Scratch removal

I solved exactly the same problem on my V Strom after someone had left a sticker on the surface which ate into the plastic. I used some rubbing compound, the type body repair shops use to blend in new paint. It did the job perfectly. The stuff I used was called G4 rubbing paste, it's the very fine type.
Hope this helps.
 
T

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I am a licensed A&P (airframe and powerplant) aircraft mechanic, although I got out of the aviation buisiness 2yrs ago, and we polished out scratches in aircraft windows all the time. The aviation industry uses a product called "Micro-Mesh" and it's just some fancy sandpaper. It does take some elbow grease as stated above but will work wonders. I would only go this route if you have some really deep scratches. Otherwise I would recomend the above mentioned plastic polish or rubbing compound. I personally use a product from Meguiar's called Mirror Glaze. I also use aircraft glass cleaner all the time so my clear parts are very rarely dirty. The Mirror Glaze leaves the plastic almost like it's been waxed and bugs just wipe off with damp cloth.

Good luck and hope this helped a little.
Kurt :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
I second the suggestion of using Meguiar's mirror glaze, I use # 17 plastic polish with a few drops of Armor All using a very soft cloth. For anyone interested in making their own windscreen, you should check out a material called SPECTAR. Scuffs and scratches can be removed from this material using a heat gun. It offers UV protection, shapes at extremely low temperature (using a paint stripper heat gun) and has good shatter resistance. To locate where this product can be found, call your local plastics distributor in the yellow pages.

Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I ended up using a 3M polish that I found in an autoparts store... it has fine grit in the polish (sold in small black bottle). I did first use some very fine spongy sandpaper (300 grit) and it all worked really well.

Now on to the next job ( need to repaint part of bike below the tank..)!

Thanks for the help.
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Some nice tips in here. Where can the Meguiar's Mirror Glaze be purchased at?

Gisle :)
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top