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I have a Hi Viz yellow Scorpion helmet. As someone in another thread pointed out, people REALLY notice the helmet. However, for me, it's noisy. It lets through a lot of low end noise that other helmets stop. My previous Icon helmet was much quieter for me. I'm getting ready for a long ride and thought about something Shep said, that after a while helmets stink. I took a couple of whiffs of mine and he's right. So I proceeded to take out the liner and clean it with some cold water and Woolite. After taking out the liner I examined the chin styrofoam and realized I can also take that out if I'm careful. Now I'm down to the basic shell and the styrofoam head piece that I'm not going to attempt to remove. The outer shell of the helmet appears to just be fiberglass. And from the design it looks as if it passes vibration right through to the inside of the helmet. So I thought about it and decided I can improve on the design by coating the inside of the fiberglass shell with silicone. Silicone was one of the first sealants used for soundproofing. Make sure to use 100% silicone that does not harden. First pic is just the naked inside of the helmet where you can see it's just hard fiberglass. I wore nitrile gloves during this process, I suggest some type of glove.



Next I ran a bead around the main piece of styrofoam that cradles your head. I did this because sound may be ringing from around the inside of the helmet down into the ear section.



Then I started putting on small patches of silicone and working it with my fingers, wearing the gloves, to get it smooth. I started with a small spreader but fingers seem to work better. After it gets tacky, like 15-20 minutes you can go over it again and further work it into a thin sheet.



After that laid the helmet on it's side in front of a fan for 3 hours to remove the silicone smell and put it back together. I won't know how much the soundproofing is improved until my ride tomorrow. Any improvement is a big plus for me since it was basically free!
 

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I just use ear plugs.
 

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That silicone ain't gonna do shee'it.

You would be better served to adjust your windscreen to afford your head a more smooth pocket of air. Or get a Madstad.
 

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Ear plugs of a chin skirt around the base of the helmet to block the wind from entering from below. :beatnik:
 

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With any experiment, I am awaiting the outcome of testing your hypothesis that silicone will act as a silencing factor in your helmet. Please keep us posted. As a sceptic, I await and attempt to weigh facts before making judgements.
 

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Quieter down

I have that same helmet and I found it to be amazingly quiet yesterday. I did ride most of the summer with a 3/4 helmet and sunglasses, so it was my first ride in three months with a full face helmet. I think that doesn't help you though. I do have a Calsci tall windshield. As others have said if you have not done anything to your stock windshield, start there.
 

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Yes, my current Scorpion is noisier than any of the several Shoeis I had before. I use a NOJ Quiet Rider skirt which helps, but I think much of the noise is coming from around the face shield, especially in the area of the hinge. While you are riding cover that part with your hand and see the difference. If a person never needed to open the shield a piece of duct tape all round would probably make a lot of difference. As it is I don't know if there is any good solution. I doubt if your silicone treatment will do anything but make your head smell like a vinaigrette salad for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just did 1 hr of test runs (had to test both bikes)

First let me say I wear earplugs rated at 32NPR. My DL650 has both a Madstad bracket and a Givi windscreen. My CB1000 has a FM-2 fairing with my original DL650 windscreen on it in a raised position and a Cobra can.

Second this was actually about cleaning my liner on the helmet. The experiment with silencing was just something I came up with as the situation presented itself.

As to why I chose 100 percent silicone, the original way to soundproof a wall is by putting a silicone bead on each of the studs in a wall then putting the sheet rock panel up. As the sound hits the hard surface of the sheet rock it passes thorough and is dampened by the silicone. Newer products, like greenglue, are better as they never fully cure and remain elastic. There are better more expensive ways to soundproof, but if you use sheet rock this is the most accepted method that I could find.

The silicone I chose was GE Silicone II as people complain all over the internet that it doesn't dry hard, perfect! I couldn't find a tube out of date as those work the best, but when I do this again my tube will be.

The results are, for me, impressive. My normal hearing range is only to 2000Hz and I can hear up to 8000Hz at 75db which is why this is so bothersome. The DL650 is better but I can tell the most with the CB1000. Now I can raise the lid and all I hear is normal wind noise, as before I got a lot of low end noise. This effect may lessen if the silicone gets harder, but the next time I clean or replace my liner I'm putting another thin coat on it, I'm also looking for some thin foam or possibly material to cover the inside of the ear position on the helmet since that's a hard surface.
 

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I'm also looking for some thin foam or possibly material to cover the inside of the ear position on the helmet since that's a hard surface.
I just finished up with a Bell Vortex, which was a great helmet for not experiencing buffetting, but it was very round and felt like being inside a big bass drum for the thrumming. The Vortex died on the driver's door of an SUV (did it's job very well) and was replaced with an Icon Alliance - the latest model.

Initially I though the Icon was quieter as the shell is not quite as big and round as the Bell's, but it too transmitted the thrumming.

What was common to both helmets was the large cavities around the ears, advertised to allow for installation of helmet speakers. My theory was that the lack of padding there created a sound chamber permitting the transmission of the low-frequency thrumming.

Recently my daughter was given a new watch. The packaging included several pieces of about 2 1/2" square foam - really cheap stuff. I tucked a piece of foam into the area where the helmet speakers are intended to go. The thrumming is not gone, but it's reduced. Sometime soon I'm going to try to double up the foam and see how that works.

For the skeptics our there, I didn't glue anything into place to compromise the structural integrity of the helmet, and there is still lots of room in the ear area of the helmet so I don't compromise the structural integrity of my ears. And I always wear earplugs - the yellow foam ones - when I ride. I ride with the stock screen at the middle position and I sold my Madstad because it was far more of a compromise than I wanted to make.

I don't think the Scorpion helmet is the culprit. Over six different helmets in the last five years, only an Arai XD3 didn't transmit the thrumming for me. The bargain alternative AFX DS37 was better than the usual profile full face helmets, but not as good as the Arai (figures that the only helmet I really like is $600+).
 

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