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Need to install Gaffers 2" top brake line extention due to risers. Bought it from AdventureTech and they do not give very good instructions. Do I need to bleed the whole system or can I basically due just the top half.? Thanks
 

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Better to bleed the whole line, it's going to take a lot of pumping to fill the new empty line. Lots of air is going to be present.
 

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So what is the best procedure to doing the whole system. Any video worth watching?
 

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I suppose "goodness" of the instructions depends on the mechanical skills of the users, and often unnecessary trepidation can make the process seem more complex thn it really is, but we have the full Galfer instructions posted here.

2012 + , 2017+ DL650 - AdventureTech, LLC.

The top line is line "A."

Yes, you need to bleed the whole front system after opening any portion of that system. There are many videos on You tube showing how to bleed brakes, but since you have a cross over line follow this guidance given previously by Greywolf.

Start with the left front caliper then do the right front. If that doesn't do it, you probably have an air bubble in the master cylinder. If that is the case, you can tie back the lever overnight. If that still doesn't do it, crack the master cylinder banjo bolt while applying a little lever pressure with a rag under it to absorb the leakage and quickly tighten it again.
 

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I added bar risers to my F800GT BMW and did not have to bleed anything, just keep your hands and feet off the brake lever peddle when you take it apart. I cleared this with my dealer before adding the extension. Didn't lose any pressure at all. Worked for me, but do it the way you feel best about. Saved me a lot of work, and next time I rode down to my dealer, who could not have been any more helpful and fair EVER (hard to believe).
 

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Tomstromr
I’m guessing that you only added risers, not an extension to the brake line as well
Not possible to replace a brake line and not bleed it ????
At least not and live to tell about it
 

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Tomstromr
I’m guessing that you only added risers, not an extension to the brake line as well
Not possible to replace a brake line and not bleed it ????
At least not and live to tell about it
No, as I said, I did add the risers and the brake line extension, and used the original cables which were fairly tight but functional. And I did not have to bleed the brakes! And I am here to tell about it. It was on a BMW F800GT, bought from Bentonville, AR BMW, Jerry, one of the owners consulted with me first over the phone. I left on a trip after doing the job and stopped by his shop. He verified everything was fine!
 

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You may not have to bleed he whole system but why not? Bleeding only part of it is like getting a shower then putting on the same dirty underwear.

Look up reverse brake bleeding on YouTube. Plenty of videos. It just plain and simple works. Also fast and easy and with only a few dollars in components. I became a believer refilling and bleeding a linked braking system on an old Moto Guzzi that rebuilt the entire braking system. They are very difficult to get all the air out. Usually its using a vacuum to pull lots of brake fluid (quart+) through the system hoping to capture any air and drag it out. Reverse bleeding I did it in 20 minutes and less than 1/2 pint of fluid.
 

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You may not have to bleed he whole system but why not? Bleeding only part of it is like getting a shower then putting on the same dirty underwear.

Look up reverse brake bleeding on YouTube. Plenty of videos. It just plain and simple works. Also fast and easy and with only a few dollars in components. I became a believer refilling and bleeding a linked braking system on an old Moto Guzzi that rebuilt the entire braking system. They are very difficult to get all the air out. Usually its using a vacuum to pull lots of brake fluid (quart+) through the system hoping to capture any air and drag it out. Reverse bleeding I did it in 20 minutes and less than 1/2 pint of fluid.
I'm aware of all that. On my bike no fluid leaked out because you never open the lever check valve and the line to the caliper stays upright, but none leaked out anyway. The brakes worked just fine, and my dealer even looked at the kit I was using on-line, his judgement too was no bleeding necessary. I've worked on lots of bikes, different makes, most aspects of maintenance, never having a breakdown, so I was very comfortable in what I did. Some don't like it-that's their choice.
You change underwear?!
 

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Please re-read my 1st sentence! Its true you may not have to bleed the system but you're this far why not take a little time and take the opprutinity and spend a few extra minutes to bleed and refresh the brake fluid?
 

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Please re-read my 1st sentence! Its true you may not have to bleed the system but you're this far why not take a little time and take the opprutinity and spend a few extra minutes to bleed and refresh the brake fluid?
FWIW, I have read it! The bike had about 2500 new miles on it, fluid did not need to be refreshed. First service had been done by the dealer. I have been to many BMW rallies where tech sessions were held and besides my dealer, talked to lots of riders, and one of the best mechanics anywhere on BMW's whose name is Glaves. Some of us fret about a lot of stuff, but I don't this kind of thing. You do, that's fine, for you! Hey, it's all good. Ride Safely!
 

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Hard to understand how you added a new line that is full of air and that doesn't require the brakes to be bled.
The whole line doesn't get replaced, it's a 2" extension that fits off the rt side master cylinder between the reservoir and original brake line. The brake line does not get loosen at the caliper or removed. And it is NOT a big deal guys. At the time there were several riders on BMW web sites who had done just as I did, and not one of them did any more than me. Gheez!
 

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The whole line doesn't get replaced, it's a 2" extension that fits off the rt side master cylinder between the reservoir and original brake line. The brake line does not get loosen at the caliper or removed. And it is NOT a big deal guys. At the time there were several riders on BMW web sites who had done just as I did, and not one of them did any more than me. Gheez!
Just trying to understand how you add a 2" line full of air to a brake system and you don't have to bleed anything. It is just automatically bleeding into the MC?
 

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Just trying to understand how you add a 2" line full of air to a brake system and you don't have to bleed anything. It is just automatically bleeding into the MC?
You are correct, BUT I could not, nor could others I spoke to about it, detect any softness in brake actuation. If air got in, which a mouse breath worth probably did, my ham fists could not tell. Frankly, I was far more concerned about the cables being too tight after I installed the risers and did not add longer cables.

:eek: Anyway, RIDE LONG FAR AND HAVE FUN!
 

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If it worked out, and stops ok, so much the better, but remember brake fluid is hygroscopic, so even the tiniest bit of air will introduce moisture into the system. Best to get it out before it fouls up the ABS valves, a pricy repair.
I'm surprised a professional dealer did not recommend that, for liability reasons if nothing else.
 

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If it worked out, and stops ok, so much the better, but remember brake fluid is hygroscopic, so even the tiniest bit of air will introduce moisture into the system. Best to get it out before it fouls up the ABS valves, a pricy repair.
I'm surprised a professional dealer did not recommend that, for liability reasons if nothing else.
If it worked out, and stops ok, so much the better, but remember brake fluid is hygroscopic, so even the tiniest bit of air will introduce moisture into the system. Best to get it out before it fouls up the ABS valves, a pricy repair.
I'm surprised a professional dealer did not recommend that, for liability reasons if nothing else.
Well, I talked to many professional service managers, noted experts, etc about BMW's. They are the experts I trust and believe, as well as my 40+ yrs working on BMW's. So, whatever!
 
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