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Replace every 5 years? Really? And while I'm at it, would you trust your grey matter to a $70 Scorpion EXO-400? If not, why and what other brands fit similarly formed noggins?
 

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I replace my helmets when I feel they are worn out, or if they ever take a hit to the ground. I look at the every 5 years the same as changing your oil every 3,000 miles.......it is outdated and unnecessary information!
 

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I replaced my Shoei RF1000 right at the 5 year mark only because the inside liner was falling apart. I emailed Shoei to see if they had any way to replace the liner, but no. If not for that I'd have kept it longer. I do agree with the replacement if dropped theory. The cost of the helmet doesn't necessarily mean it won't protect you less, but some of the cheaper ones don't have as good mechanisms, straps, visor attachment, etc. Failures there may mean early replacement even though the shell is in good condition. Time and air pollution etc., can have a degrading effect on the inner styrofoam, which is a major part of the shock protection, even though the shell is not otherwise damaged.
 

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My Arai XD is 7+ years old. I have been saying I was going to replace it the last couple of years but have spent the money on other "necessities".

Maybe this winter. :mrgreen:
 

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My 10 year old N102 is done, liner has fallen apart, hinges are loose, never felt comfy and it weighs way too much etc. But, it was a durable sucker. I kept wearing that Nolan the longest, I think its finally worn out now.

I have Shark helmets that are 7 years old or more and still function like new and I have many miles on them. I've only purchased one replacement liner over the years, usually the whole thing wears out first.

I just replace them when they are no longer desirable to use. The Scorpion helmets are HEAVY and run small to me, I have tried them. Get what fits and get quality if you like. I've had Fulmer helmets fit great and I've hated the fancy $400 plus lids. Buy what FITS your head! I look at the liner material and build quality for the price. My cheap AFX 39DS has a great liner and that one has aged well but, the rest is cheaply made. Still like it for a $100 lid though.

I want a comfy modular helmet for my oval head, but I am most comfortable in a Shark RSI XL that is fairly light and low on noise. If I could find a modular that fits like a RSI I would be... :hurray:

Fit is #1
Quality for cost is #2
Lighter the weight the better is #3
Do chicks dig Hi-Viz helmets... :green_lol:
 

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Replace every 5 years? Really? And while I'm at it, would you trust your grey matter to a $70 Scorpion EXO-400? If not, why and what other brands fit similarly formed noggins?
I'm doing a research project for college right now on helmets. While this question/topic opens up a can of worms (i.e. how much is your head worth thing), the price of a helmet does not mean it is going to protect it any better than an expensive one. There will be a difference in build quality (how solid it feels, seals, weight, etc.), but there are no studies to back up an expensive helmet protecting better than a cheap one.

With regards to safety, you've got the three standard ratings: DOT, SNELL, and ECE. The DOT and ECE are generally very similar, but some argue the ECE is a bit better. SNELL has been somewhat controversial due to how they test - to pass their tests, a helmet generally has to be "stiffer" to withstand repeated hits and because of that, more G force energy is transferred to the head. They've addressed some of this with their new 2010 rating, but it's seems to be the same. SNELL is also voluntary meaning companies do not HAVE to send helmets to them whereas DOT and ECE are government requirements. SNELL will not test modular helmets.

Generally it is simply suggested that you buy the helmet that fits you the
best (fit and budget), as fit is important, and not get hung up over how much a helmet costs. The type of helmet is also important since a full face will protect better than a 3/4 or pudding bowl, etc. It's personal choice, but again, I wouldn't get hung up on cost.
 

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I have an HJC CL-16 that i bought in 2005 with my first bike. It was the cheapest I could find at the time in XXL for my giant noggin. I'm sure its still good enough to protect me, but I recently replaced it with a Nolan N104. I figured why worry about an 8-yo helmet that was super cheap to begin with. My new Wee deserves better :) Didnt hurt that I got the Nolan for less than half of MSRP, too. The 104 is gigantic, though.
 

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What B says.

What I would add is any helmet you get should be at least DOT qualified and beware of 'knock off' brands that may a counterfeit DOT sticker.

I replace my helmets when I feel they are worn out, or if they ever take a hit to the ground. I look at the every 5 years the same as changing your oil every 3,000 miles.......it is outdated and unnecessary information!
 

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Tattoogunman - Since you are researching helmets at the moment perhaps you could share with us the difference between DOT and CE standards. Schuberth again is providing a helmet that meets both standards. Does that make it better in some way? Or not??
 

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I have different helmets that I wear. One is a 20 year old Shoei. I'm sure it is not the safest but I wear it in cold weather because it seals the best. I just bought a Windjammer that I will put on a newer HJC helmet for winter use instead of the old Shoei.
 

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I just retired a Bell Star after 6 years and 70,000 miles. I'm still using a Bell Star identical to the old one but newer with less miles and a new Bell RS1.
 

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age of helmet

8 years

one scuff on the left side from a low speed lowside

one scuff on rear from low side at the track

its in good shape structurall and so is liner
 

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I feel that the inner expanded polystyrene (EPS) liner inside the helmet shell is the most important part of the helmet. The hard shell protects against penetration and protects the EPS liner. The EPS liner absorbs shock to minimize the brain slamming against the inside of the skull when there's an impact. Think of your brain floating in liquid inside your skull. Think of an egg yolk floating inside the egg shell. Think of the egg being shaken so hard that the yolk scrambles inside the intact shell. That's what happens when your brain is severely concussed.

"The five-year replacement recommendation is based on a consensus by both helmet manufacturers and the Snell Foundation. Glues, resins and other materials used in helmet production can affect liner materials. Hair oils, body fluids and cosmetics, as well as normal "wear and tear" all contribute to helmet degradation. Petroleum based products present in cleaners, paints, fuels and other commonly encountered materials may also degrade materials used in many helmets possibly degrading performance. Additionally, experience indicates there will be a noticeable improvement in the protective characteristic of helmets over a five-year period due to advances in materials, designs, production methods and the standards. Thus, the recommendation for five-year helmet replacement is a judgment call stemming from a prudent safety philosophy."
Snell Foundation - Helmet FAQ

I'm doing a research project for college right now on helmets. ...

With regards to safety, you've got the three standard ratings: DOT, SNELL, and ECE. The DOT and ECE are generally very similar, but some argue the ECE is a bit better. SNELL has been somewhat controversial due to how they test - to pass their tests, a helmet generally has to be "stiffer" to withstand repeated hits and because of that, more G force energy is transferred to the head. They've addressed some of this with their new 2010 rating, but it's seems to be the same. SNELL is also voluntary meaning companies do not HAVE to send helmets to them whereas DOT and ECE are government requirements. SNELL will not test modular helmets.
Facts:
"Snell does not dismiss out of hand any helmet design that strays from the conventional. Snell does not point out any design specifications other than general requirements in its standards. We are, however, always concerned with innovations and new designs that may effect helmet's ability to protect the wearer, or in some cases helmet's potential to cause injury. At present the Foundation has not had the opportunity to test any of the flip up front type helmets for certification. We do not find any fault with these designs as long as they are used according to the manufacturers instructions and meet all of the requirements of the standard."
Snell Foundation - Helmet FAQ

"Snell M2010 allows no more than 275 G for helmet sizes up through 59 cm but, for the two largest head forms, where the ECE 22-05 limit would allow harder helmets than the current Snell M2005, M2010 sets accelerations limits even lower than ECE 22-05.

"M2010 sets the peak G-force criteria to 275 G for the medium and smaller helmet sizes. This is level is consistent with every major world standard. The peak G criteria for the two largest head forms are set even lower to assure that the helmets do not transmit any more G's than previous Snell requirements."
Snell 2010 Standard - webBikeWorld



 

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I crashed and broke my Scorpion 1000EXO. My head bone is still in one piece. It only cost me $100 on sale, so yes I would trust my head to a Scorpion helmet. It's Snell/Dot approved. And it fits as nicely as my Shoei did when they didn't cost so much.
Paying several hundred dollars for the expensive helmets doesn't buy any more protection.
It's just a chance for different graphics on the surface and bragging rights about your wallet.
Oh, I replace mine in about 3 years, but I ride a lot and wear it out. How long it lasts is dependent on use.
 

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I crashed and broke my Scorpion 1000EXO. My head bone is still in one piece. It only cost me $100 on sale, so yes I would trust my head to a Scorpion helmet. It's Snell/Dot approved. And it fits as nicely as my Shoei did when they didn't cost so much.
Paying several hundred dollars for the expensive helmets doesn't buy any more protection.
It's just a chance for different graphics on the surface and bragging rights about your wallet.
Oh, I replace mine in about 3 years, but I ride a lot and wear it out. How long it lasts is dependent on use.
Scorpion makes the best bang for you buck helmet no doubt "I have one of those too", but paying more for a Shoei, Arai, Shark, Schuberth "etc" has allot to do with comfort and the best optical clarity for their shields. You will also find many of the lightest helmets to be the higher end offerings, but you are for sure correct in the more expensive helmets do not make them any more safe than cheaper options.
 

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Tattoogunman - Since you are researching helmets at the moment perhaps you could share with us the difference between DOT and CE standards. Schuberth again is providing a helmet that meets both standards. Does that make it better in some way? Or not??
This is from another site and sums it up fairly well - if you want specific tests that they each do, I can pull the info:

DOT – An acronym for Department of Transport, DOT is the is US government approved standard and, in the United States, is the most popular. DOT standards are aimed at protecting skulls from 90% of impact types ( low to moderate energy impacts according to the HURT Report) and favours a more shock-absorbent helmet. The maximum G-force allowed by the DOT test is 250g’s, an impact of 200 to 250 g’s to the head would result in a severe, though probably survivable brain injury (the DOT anvil is either flat or “kerb shaped” depending on the test). The DOT’s favouritism towards more shock-absorbent helmets seems to fall inline with recent studies indicating that absorbing the force of an impact is more important than resisting the impact.

Snell – The Snell Memorial Foundation is a not-for-profit, independent organisation established in 1957 and is named after William “Pete” Snell, a famous racing car driver who was tragically killed in 1956 when a helmet failed to protect his head during an accident. The Snell M2005 is the “old standard” and favours a more shock-resistant helmet, the M2010 is the new, more shock-absorbent standard. The Snell M2005 test allows an impact-shock of up to 300g’s, a 250 to 300g impact would result in a critical head injury. The M2010 standard allows a maximum of 275g’s (the Snell anvil is a steel ball shaped rather like a tennis ball, they also test with flat and “kerb” shaped anvils). The Snell M2005 standard is widely believed to be too “hard”, the newer M2010 is set to replace it completely in 2013, the M2010 standard favours more impact-absorbent helmets and a helmet that passes the M2010 test will probably also pass the DOT and ECE R22-05 tests (though this isn’t guaranteed). Snell certified helmets are allowed by the AMA for professional motorcycle racing however the M2005 standard will no longer be permitted after 2011.

ECE R22-05 – Developed by the rather lengthily named United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, this is the most common helmet certification internationally, required by over 50 countries worldwide. It is approved for all competition events by AMA, WERA, FIM, CCS, Formula USA and the big one – MotoGP. It, much like the DOT standard, favours a more impact-absorbent helmet allowing a maximum of 275g’s (the ECE R22-05 anvil is either flat or “kerb shaped” depending on the test). The ECE R22-05 is arguably the most up-to-date helmet certification standard, it’s wide use in a variety of high-level motorcycle racing classes is reassuring to many. The ECE R22-05 has more in common with the DOT standard than either the Snell M2005 or M2010 standard, an ECE R22-05 certified helmet are likely to pass the DOT test and vice-versa.
 

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I pretty much buy Bell Stars exclusively. I do have others, but.... That being said. I haven't been able to make it more than 5 or so years without wanting a new helmet so bad I get one whether I need it or not. So, yeah, every 5 years, but not because someone said so. Usually the padding or strap or something wears out to the point I just get another.
 
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