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I would use the word "mask" or the words "gloss over". Unless your fueling is running closed loop it cannot self adjust to compensate for changing conditions you are not correcting the problems you are covering them up.

I do not assume you are wrong. You simply are wrong and in a lot of instances. It has nothing to do with me.
It has everything to do with you. Just because you say something is wrong, does not make it so. It is funny to me that you seem to be the only person here to find my mistakes.

I will just sit back and watch you spin your Teflon fantasy.
 

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Zowy, a pissing contest! Excellent. These are always interesting. Casual observers get a ream of possibly useful information, if you can sort though it.

"they don't pay a lot for trades."
Are you privy to any dealer that makes a over the top offer on used bikes, especially with a possible defect?
Some times at Bert's over the years they have sold perfectly good bikes at a low price because they have been on the floor too long.
Years ago they had a ripping good deal on early SV 650's with the extra fairing parts because they were the ungodly copper color no one wanted.
 

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..........................

So I ask you knower of all things PTFE how did the world seal tapered threads prior to the invention of PTFE?

Wait a minute. :confused:

I made a mistake remember. I said that Teflon tape or compound works as a thread sealer. Not in place of a sealing washer (I use spit instead of a sealing washer), but as a way of helping the OP with sealing his weeping threads. Then you "corrected" one of my many mistakes, informing me Teflon was a lubricant. Now the spin control has started.

Teflon tape is now a sealer. Twenty seven years, I guess you learned something today.

This is your standard operating procedure.

You don't even realize what you are saying. Pretty sad actually.
 

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I know for a FACT that a PCV or PCIII did in fact cure ALL of my lean running issues, as it runs "in conjunction" of the base map in the ECM. I also tried the Yoshimura box method first, as it DOES over write the ECM.......but the PCIII worked much better and gave me much more flexibility for additional tuning. PerazziMX14....go browse around the first gen 1000 section, you'll see just how well the power commander more times than not CURE the lean fueling issues. ;)

There are those who got an ECM swap for their lean running 1000's, and the result was barely better.....the PC units FIXED the issue.
 

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Wait a minute. :confused:

I made a mistake remember. I said that Teflon tape or compound works as a thread sealer. Not in place of a sealing washer (I use spit instead of a sealing washer), but as a way of helping the OP with sealing his weeping threads. Then you "corrected" one of my many mistakes, informing me Teflon was a lubricant. Now the spin control has started.

Teflon tape is now a sealer. Twenty seven years, I guess you learned something today.

This is your standard operating procedure.

You don't even realize what you are saying. Pretty sad actually.
I've never said Teflon tape was is or will ever be a thread sealant. I stated it is what it is a thread lubricant. I asked you in your infinite wisdom how pipe threads were sealed for the 100+ years prior to the invention and use of Teflon and would love to hear your answer to it but like always you deflect and skirt the question.


You are trying to make me out to be the bad guy here and I'm not sure why. What Have I posted that is not accurate?

I also stand by the fact that PC's alone don't correct fuel map issues and only mask or gloss over them. Unfortunately if you are unable to comprehend the difference between the two systems it is impossible to understand how they operate.
 

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I know for a FACT that a PCV or PCIII did in fact cure ALL of my lean running issues, as it runs "in conjunction" of the base map in the ECM. I also tried the Yoshimura box method first, as it DOES over write the ECM.......but the PCIII worked much better and gave me much more flexibility for additional tuning. PerazziMX14....go browse around the first gen 1000 section, you'll see just how well the power commander more times than not CURE the lean fueling issues. ;)

There are those who got an ECM swap for their lean running 1000's, and the result was barely better.....the PC units FIXED the issue.

The PC more times than not gives the ability to add more or less fuel at a predetermined rate no matter the surrounding conditions. So lets say at sea level I program my PCIII during a 70 degree day at 75% RH I need drops of fuel per second at idle, 4 drop at 1/4 throttle 6 drops at 3/4 and 8 drops at WOT.

Tomorrow I ride up a 15,000 foot mountain pass and the air is thinner, the temperature is 40 degrees cooler and the humidity is 40% does the same PCIII setting work equally well as it did yesterday. Is the fuel needs the same. What was rich yesterday might be lean today or vise versa. Thats is because an open loop system is like a carb once its set, its set. It does not have the ability to self analyze and make corrections on the go to the A/F mixture to optimize for ever changing conditions. What PCIII's do is fool the bikes ECU into adding or omitting fuel in ranges not in finite area. While the surging might have gone away are you actually loosing HP in other areas as you are dumping in more fuel than can be efficiently burned. The seat of the pants dyno and a dyno are two drastically things. There has been more than one instance where some did some a/f changes to their bike and thought the change was dramatic because the seat of the pants dyno "felt" better, more responsive or a power hit. Then put the bike on the dyno and found what thy did had a negative effect. This is usually because the bike runs good in one area and not another. So they transition area of the throttle position have a power spike/hit verses a bike that is properly fuel in ALL the throttle range but feel linear.


To minimize surging at a certain RPM you can also drop a tooth in the front and up 2 teeth in the rear. The surging is still there but you either get through the RPM range where the surging occurred faster and don't notice it or you generally ride in a different RMP range so the perception of the surging is gone.
 

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Find someone with a Yosh box. Richen up the 2000-4000rpm range.

Then sell it.

Buy something that puts a smile on your face.

FWIW: I Yoshed my 2006 190,000kms ago. I still smile when I ride it. It was the best case of beer I ever spent. And I even drank a few of them myself that Friday afternoon. Some Suzuki shop near you has one, but you will likely pay in $ rather than beer unless you're on friendly terms.

As for the drain plug, that's just a minor annoyance. A time-sert or similar remedy and problem solved. Or live with a minor leak.

Your bike is not dead. It just needs some love and it will love you back.
 

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I've never said Teflon tape was is or will ever be a thread sealant. I stated it is what it is a thread lubricant. I asked you in your infinite wisdom how pipe threads were sealed for the 100+ years prior to the invention and use of Teflon and would love to hear your answer to it but like always you deflect and skirt the question.
I am no plumber BUT I can distinctly recall, as a boy, watching a plumber in the 1950's making repairs to galvanised steel plumbing, and using some (possibly green cloured) grease or compound, and infusing into that compound threads of frayed twine to seal several joints.

I also stand by the fact that PC's alone don't correct fuel map issues and only mask or gloss over them. Unfortunately if you are unable to comprehend the difference between the two systems it is impossible to understand how they operate.

Many bikes come jetted very lean to pass emissions testing and the intention of Power Commanders and ECU mods is that they enrichen the fuel mixture, as and when required, to ensure that in adverse conditions that the bike receives sufficient fueling to run smoothly.
Furthermore, in your post #9 you posted "Teflon tap dope and pipe dope are not thread sealants, they are thread lubricants. The interference fit of tapered threads is the "seal"." while quoting and replying to another troopers suggestion of using Teflon tape on the drain bolt threads in an effort to stop an oil leak.
So you DID incorrectly infer that oil drain bolts have a tapered thread.

I would be grateful if you could stand back from this thread and allow other posters to assist the OP.
 

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As for your leaky drain plug, try using one of these Fumoto B111SX M14-1.25 BSX SERIES drain valves - they're designed so you never have to remove a drain plug, for it uses a spring loaded valve instead. They're very well made, and easy to use - and you never have to remove your drain plug again, and prevent further damage to your repaired drain-hole threads - just put on a fresh crimping washer, some teflon tape and one of these quick drain valves and 99% of your issues disappear. Your leak might disappear too.

They're about $35

Here's the one for your 2005 dl1000 : Search Results | Fumoto® Engine Oil Drain Valves

And a link on amazon fyi: https://www.amazon.com/Fumoto-B111SX-Engine-Drain-Valve/dp/B079XBHLFN

slap a fresh Power Commander on that bike and you may just decide to keep it for another 40,000 miles!
 

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Thanks jokermtb I've never seen anything like this , always learning on this site
 

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Discussion Starter #31
As for your leaky drain plug, try using one of these Fumoto B111SX M14-1.25 BSX SERIES drain valves - they're designed so you never have to remove a drain plug, for it uses a spring loaded valve instead. They're very well made, and easy to use - and you never have to remove your drain plug again, and prevent further damage to your repaired drain-hole threads - just put on a fresh crimping washer, some teflon tape and one of these quick drain valves and 99% of your issues disappear. Your leak might disappear too.

They're about $35

Here's the one for your 2005 dl1000 : Search Results | Fumoto®️ Engine Oil Drain Valves

And a link on amazon fyi: https://www.amazon.com/Fumoto-B111SX-Engine-Drain-Valve/dp/B079XBHLFN

slap a fresh Power Commander on that bike and you may just decide to keep it for another 40,000 miles!
Sadly I already have a similar set up but the leak comes from the threads that the first piece goes into. Here’s a picture of the original damage, and then the leak even after the repair.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Find someone with a Yosh box. Richen up the 2000-4000rpm range.

Then sell it.

Buy something that puts a smile on your face.

FWIW: I Yoshed my 2006 190,000kms ago. I still smile when I ride it. It was the best case of beer I ever spent. And I even drank a few of them myself that Friday afternoon. Some Suzuki shop near you has one, but you will likely pay in $ rather than beer unless you're on friendly terms.

As for the drain plug, that's just a minor annoyance. A time-sert or similar remedy and problem solved. Or live with a minor leak.

Your bike is not dead. It just needs some love and it will love you back.
Thanks for the positive vibes. I ordered a PCV and plan to keep the bike and ride it as long as it keeps running
 

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Sadly I already have a similar set up but the leak comes from the threads that the first piece goes into. Here’s a picture of the original damage, and then the leak even after the repair.

How did you repair that crack?
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Sadly I already have a similar set up but the leak comes from the threads that the first piece goes into. Here’s a picture of the original damage, and then the leak even after the repair.

How did you repair that crack?
Well it took a while to find the right person. No shops in town wanted to touch it. My mechanic asked his friend who builds turbos for bikes and cars and does a lot of aluminum welding if he would look at my bike. This guy ended up welding it and rethreading the drain hole. He had a whole process and it was very cool. Apparently aluminum is really difficult to weld because it flexes or something, so I felt good that this guy was so confident about it. I was seriously thinking that I would either have to sell the bike for parts or find a new motor...neither of which I wanted to do. So, in the big picture, a small oil leak is something I have learned to live with. I’m also in grad school and my bike is my commuter (50 miles per day), so I can’t really afford to get a new bike right now.
 

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Did you put a new crush washer on the drain plug? The bolt will leak without a crush washer or a bad one. If the bolt still leaks with a new washer, my guess is the thread may have been cut on a slight angle, or possibly the crack was not fully welded.
 

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You could leave it as is. It takes many drops of oil to fill a thimble.
Alternatively, use WD40 and a rag to clean the area and lie on the deck to watch the plug and see exactly where the leak is. Your engineer had a good idea in fitting the 90 degree fitting to avoid the need to reseal the plug every time you did an oil change.
Perhaps he might have another go if you could positively identify where the leak is.

Best done when the oil is hot and therefore flows easier.
 
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