StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
553 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Folks,

It's been semi-decent weather around here (Central New Mexico), so I've been taking my 2011 DL650A out when the temps have been hitting upper 40's to low/mid 50's. Let's not talk about the wind/windchill however. In any case, I'm curious how long folks seem to need to wait for the temp bars to rise?? In general, my bike always eventually operates at three bars on the temp scale, summer or winter. I also try to always wait until at least the bottom one is on before I start to ride off and then putt along until the second lights. Seems to take at least two or three minutes before the first bar lights. Couple miles later I see the second, then a few miles further I finally see the third one. Does this seem normal to everyone?? Now being water cooled with a thermostat, I wonder if the seemingly couple minutes of idle before the first bar may indicate a sticking open thermostat?

Just curious.
Thanks in advance,

Rick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,395 Posts
Like all the bikes I've owned, gas and go. Unless you are a complete red line nit the bike will run fine even when cold. No need to wait using up gas to warm the bike up. Well, maybe if you've tuned it up poorly!
If your were on the north slope or in Siberia in minus horrible warming may be an issue.
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,104 Posts
A few seconds for the oil pump to get things moving is all it takes before starting off but take it easy for a while. I like to stay under 6000rpm until I get a bar. The engine warms up best under a light load. Idle speed is no load and it will take a while. In that time, you are burning fuel and polluting the atmosphere for zero gain.
 
R

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
A few seconds for the oil pump to get things moving is all it takes before starting off but take it easy for a while. I like to stay under 6000rpm until I get a bar. The engine warms up best under a light load. Idle speed is no load and it will take a while. In that time, you are burning fuel and polluting the atmosphere for zero gain.
Do you also get more sludge in the oil if the engine is at idle ? (especially if it's dead cold)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,442 Posts
The general rule for all engines is that as soon as it'll run smoothly, drive it easy to let it warm under light load. I do that the same on my truck, car, or bike at +40°F as I do in the car or truck in the mountains on a -20°F morning.

Diesels are different from gasoline engines, of course, and I've been factory trained at two diesel makers. Both required zero warm up by running--engine heaters were essential when cold, then start them and put load on them.

With a car or truck in cold weather, an electric engine heater saves fuel, doesn't puke up the air as much, reduces engine wear, and provides the driver more comfort.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
759 Posts
I also try to always wait until at least the bottom one is on before I start to ride off

Rick
I start the bike and then finish putting on my helmet and zip up the coat, and gloves, and any other last minute clothing issues and then I take off. Go easy for at least until two bars, minimum, and then give it hell after hitting three bars...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,482 Posts
I start the bike and then finish putting on my helmet and zip up the coat, and gloves, and any other last minute clothing issues and then I take off. Go easy for at least until two bars, minimum, and then give it hell after hitting three bars...
That's my routine too, during the riding season. Lunch box and Stanley in the top case, start her up, zip up jacket, put on helmet, put on gloves, mount and go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,395 Posts
Some times it really pays to start the bike before finishing dressing. Nothing like beginning to cook in your clothes while trying to bump start the bike or rip off the gear to get at the battery for a jump.:biggrinjester:
 

·
Living the Stereotype
Joined
·
11,544 Posts
Does it need to be said that you should let the bike idle in the outdoors?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
I didn't realize you needed to let it warm up.
I dress in the house, walk to an unheated storage facility 2 blocks away, unlock the door, get on the bike start it up, get off and close the door, then get back on and I ride. The highway is 1 block away. So I guess it warms up while I get off, close the door and get back on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,395 Posts
didn't realize you needed to let it warm up.
I dress in the house, walk to an unheated storage facility 2 blocks away, unlock the door, get on the bike start it up, get off and close the door, then get back on and I ride. The highway is 1 block away. So I guess it warms up while I get off, close the door and get back on.

Haven't told the wife you have a motorcycle yet?
 

·
$tromtrooper
Joined
·
2,378 Posts
Hmm, I usually wait for one bar then keep it below 5k until I get three. Two shows as I approach the stop sign 1/2 mile up the hill from the house. The third, a quarter mile more or so down the road. Guess I might rethink the one bar wait given the posts here.

I admit I only wait for my bikes. Autos are jump in and go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
I treat my bikes just like my cars. Start them, wait a few seconds, drive moderately until the gauge starts climbing and then drive normally. Most new engine designs with electronic controlled fuel systems do not need to warm up before being used.
 

·
Living the Stereotype
Joined
·
11,544 Posts
How true. When the exhaust condensation drips on the living room carpet it really pisses of the wifey :jawdrop:
She needs to lighten up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
I have a car with an oil temperature gauge, which is a better indicator of engine operating temp than the coolant temp gauge. While I can get heat after about 3 miles. The oil temperature would would take about 10+ miles to come up to temp. Woe to the person who takes the engine to red line without all the parts in the engine fully warmed up and lubricated.

This may not be an such an issue issue with motorcycle engines given their relatively low mass compared to a car engine. Perhaps however, the appearance of the 3rd bar may not signal the time to flog it. I limit it to around 5k until the 2nd bar.

Just saw the movie Secretariat, maybe if we talked to our bikes? :)

Happy New Year,
Bruce
 

·
$tromtrooper
Joined
·
2,378 Posts
...Perhaps however, the appearance of the 3rd bar may not signal the time to flog it. I limit it to around 5k until the 2nd bar.
...
Not that I have ever "flogged" it (you mean the motorcycle, right?), but on cold days I have more concern about the tires even after three bars. The time or two when I've thought I sensed a slight, sideways slip in the front it was on very cold mornings during a U-turn and on a traffic circle very close to the house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Ride and go. The battery is getting no charge but working all the time you are idling. As it's normally (atm) 0-4C I don't see the point in stressing the battery anymore than necessary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
553 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
OK, folks......points made. As a test yesterday, after posting, I went for a ride. I did let it idle until first bar and it took 4 minutes. Yes, I sort of timed it using the clock on the bike. I rode gently until second bar, additional two minutes and then I forgot how long for the third bar but think it was another couple/three minutes. First to second bar is basically riding within my subdivision so I take it easy anyway.

Like others I start it and finish zipping up my jacket and putting on my helmet and gloves. I guess from now on, I'll take that as time to start out slowly.

Thanks everyone.....good info.

Rick "Trying to go riding a little today" Duncan
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Top