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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Yesterday the wife and I put 200 miles on the Strom, riding County Roads, as well as Interstate. I am still learning about this bike, but I am a little freaked about having too much weight on the back tire, the appartently high temperature of the tire, etc.

The last thing I want is to have a rear tire blowout with the wife on board.

So, is the stock rear tire a good one to handle more weight with high speeds (80mph)?

The wife and I go about 400 lbs (250 for me and 140 for the wife)....then I have Givi Racks and 3 Cases....

Should I be worried?

Honestly, I am sitting here typing, thinking about the tires on Goldwings, 1200LT's, etc....and those bikes are a lot heavier and those touring dudes haul a lot of gear.....

As I regularly stop and check my tires, I always put a hand on the front and rear tire. The rear tire, just seems pretty hot (especially compared to auto tires)..... Should I be concerned?

So far, I have 1,800 miles on the DL650 with no issues or problems that I am aware of.

A final question.....I am a 95/5 rider (prefer Colorado twisties over rough dirt road)....when the time comes to change the tires, would I be well served to replace with a tire that is .....say built for long distance, heavy touring?
 

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With that much weight you probably need to run higher pressure in the rear tire. I don't remember what the recommended inflation pressure is, but look at the placard on the chain guard. It shows the recommended pressures for 1 person and for 2.
 

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Look at the sticker attached to the frame with all of the bike's specs. I'd venture to say that even with you, your wife and reasonably loaded luggage you're still within the GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating or maximum design weight of the bike). That GVWR takes into account the basic tire choices fitted to the bike, but like SCraig says you need to run higher pressure in the tires also when heavily loaded. I use the max tire pressure posted on the tire sidewall as my guide for that.

The stock tire is either H- or V-rated. H is for sustained 130 mph speeds and V is for sustained 150 mph, I'd suspect that you're just peachy running along at 80 mph....
 

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I don't think you should have any problems with tires on a bike as light as a Strom. I am a big guy, 300 lbs. and the wife is about 150 lbs.:rolleyes: and we load down my Harley Road King with no problems. Bags are stuffed full and I have the largest Nelson-Riggs bag that they sell, and it is usually filled to the top.

The main thing is to NOT ride with the tire underinflated. That will cause them to run hotter and that is not good. I would go with the specs that are on the sidewall of the tire, they usually have a pressure recommendation for max load.
 

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[snip]

The wife and I go about 400 lbs (250 for me and 140 for the wife)....then I have Givi Racks and 3 Cases....

Should I be worried?

[snip]
would I be well served to replace with a tire that is .....say built for long distance, heavy touring?

unless yer carying granite blocks in your side cases & topcase, I don't think you have anything to worry about

your pretty much limited to what is available size wise. I beleive the 150/70 is a heavy touring tire, it's stock size on all the big adventure bikes, I notice they cost more than some sportbike tires



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The manual states to increase the pressure on the rear tires to 41 when riding 2-up. 36 is normal operating pressure for 1-up.

When I picked up my '07 from the dealer, I checked the air in both tires as soon as I got home. The front was 31, the rear 28! YIKES!!!
 

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The manual states to increase the pressure on the rear tires to 41 when riding 2-up. 36 is normal operating pressure for 1-up.

When I picked up my '07 from the dealer, I checked the air in both tires as soon as I got home. The front was 31, the rear 28! YIKES!!!
One thing to note regarding tire pressures, is make sure your using a gauge that works... A friend of mine once had 3 gauges in his shop and all 3 had different readings up to 10 PSI difference!!!
 

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One thing to note regarding tire pressures, is make sure your using a gauge that works... A friend of mine once had 3 gauges in his shop and all 3 had different readings up to 10 PSI difference!!!
+1 on that. Mine's a self-calibrating digital model.
 
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