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It’s true poly is light and dries quick and cotton DOES kill in the winter, since Boy Scouts Klondike Derby days I’ve been into winter camping and mountaineering including multi week mid winter outings in the Rockies. Did I really enjoy winter camping? Was I insane? Anyway, silk and wool work great too, wool dries slower but has the properties of still insulating when fully wet but can get kind of doggy. Poly ends up getting to the point where you just can’t wash out the smell, silk is just so dam comfortable. They all have their pluses and minuses.
Hypothermia no joke and I’ve seen it mid summer many times in the Rockies. You have to have your systems dialed in.
Hand and foot warmer packs are great. Fatty food helps enormously. Once a person is showing signs of hypothermia though they are in trouble and need to warmed immediately if it means pitching your tent at the side of the road and throwing them in their sleeping bag and boiling water for hot tea. First aid protocol is to climb into the bag with the hypothermic individual.
Hypothermia seriously impacts mental function, decision making and coordination very quickly a recipe for disaster on the bike.
Not long ago some idiot Snowmobilers got stranded miles back with no gear near me in Co.
They had no lighter so McGyvered a fire by pulling a plug and sparking a torch they had dipped in the gas tank to start a huge bonfire and save their ass. They were idiots but I admire ingenuity in the face of adversity, and keep that trick tucked away. Best survival tool you can have is a Bic lighter. My friends from Alaska tell me the rule is you don’t step out the back door without a Bic and it HAS to be a Bic.
 

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Never had a problem with odour on poly but then I'm not sweating in it very often and it's such an easy rinse. There are some very cool anti-odour materials now.

I really like the fit and finish of 511 gear.
https://www.511tactical.com/range-ready-long-sleeve.html

I use these socks as they know what they are doing and they honour their life time warranty.
https://darntough.com

Those guys with the stranded sled indeed were clever ...it's a narrow window to survive short of burrowing in a snow cave.

Actually was eyeing a nifty tiny survival kit online.
https://www.amazon.ca/Justech-Emergency-Carabiner-Adventure-Traveling/dp/B075CYGB8J/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?gclid=Cj0KCQjwqs3rBRCdARIsADe1pfTpSbwoIhmSENKDMcGMTr5n3aVLRXo9KUYl7ORQm0-HH6XZlzMmG88aAt1hEALw_wcB&hvadid=230005708535&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=1002199&hvnetw=g&hvpos=1t1&hvqmt=e&hvrand=10099044523345906406&hvtargid=aud-748921816267:kwd-492195881192&hydadcr=9100_10287276&keywords=mini+survival+kit&qid=1567884882&s=gateway&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUExS0MyQlVKTUtSU1VNJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwNDA4OTM4MkVTMlFYWVkwSTVVWiZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwMzA2NTg1SFJVVDg1M0s0MlhTJndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfYXRmJmFjdGlvbj1jbGlja1JlZGlyZWN0JmRvTm90TG9nQ2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

Pretty small and light - there are lots out there. Someone blow a stator or battery middle of nowhere at dusk. Would be good to have.
 

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Better yet boots that keep your socks dry. I'm sold on Gortex now...if it fails you get gear replaced.
 

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While still in Richland I made some evaporative cooling chaps and evaporative cooling jacket (not vest). Worked too good until it doesn't work at all. Really cold at 100 degree ambient and then all bundled up nice and warn when the water was gone. In the end I just supplemented my cooling vest with cooling pads inside the helmet and across my forearms. Still need to stop every hour or less to re-wet the stuff.

I'm still waiting on someone to come up with a cost effective solution. The personal cooling systems that are out there that work are big bucks.

One methods used in the past was put on your winter gear as insulation and fill your pockets with ice/wear an ice vest. No control though.

 

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climate changes or more accurate word is climate shifting are occurring since thousands of years and nothing new about that. As for a motorcycle riding you have always micro climate changes
again normal stuff. You start in the morning it's cold, at noon it's hot, then raining and in the evening cool again :) normal biker life. Let's don't flatter ourselves that people have any influence on climate on Earth.
 

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In my previous message I would add either my pant legs to my shorts or normal street pants instead of the shorts for temperatures in the mid 50's down to or around freezing.

I routinely ride down to 0°f / -18°c I haven't done day long rides at 0°f but have down hour long rides at that temperature and tons of rides, many all day long, in the teens °f.

(I am not talking about heading down single track but riding on the street.)

I always found the base layer you guys are talking about (whether merino wool or synthetic) started me sweating as I overheated getting dressed or when I stop for a coffee/lunch.

For temps below freezing, or near freezing for long rides, I will add Aerostich Fleece pants over my street pants (jeans, dress pants, or whatever I will be wearing at my destination.) I will add another soft shell over the heated jacket and soft shell, and last year I added heated socks as age has made my feet harder to keep warm. heater gloves keep my hands warm and the Roadcrafter goes over everything else.

In case my heated gear stopped working (My current stuff hasn't) if I was venturing further from home I carry my old Frogg Toggs Road Toads Jacket in my topcase as an extra layer. If my gloves stopped heating my Triple Digit rain Gloves that sit in my breast pocket can go over my heavier heated gloves. I also seasonally close off the bottom part of my factory handguards in the cold season.
 

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Let's don't flatter ourselves that people have any influence on climate on Earth
missed the memo did you?
It's getting warmer ....we're responsible. Even Exxon gets it, got it 40 years ago.
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/exxon-knew-about-climate-change-almost-40-years-ago/
....... you out in the on fringes with the flat earthers and anti-vaxxers. >:)

•••••

Motorcyclists are more exposed to weather and micro-climates as that's where the fun is. Still it's not much fun trudging through extreme weather without decent gear .....and at times it can be dangerous. Thought I could beat out a fast moving thundercell...had a miserable time as a mini-tornado did its damnest to pluck me out from the underpass.

But there are times following a line of thunderstorms that the air is invigorating and the sun is lighting these incredible lightning shows.

One thing not covered here is fogging when the temperature and humidity gets stupid and I'm sold on my Schuberth C3 ...it just does not fog up.
 

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Hand and foot warmer packs are great. ....
.... Hypothermia seriously impacts mental function, decision making and coordination very quickly a recipe for disaster on the bike. ...
When you get into the range of clinical hypothermia, you should apply those heat packs - or - your electric glove liners to over your kidneys. (if you don't know where they are, take a minute to google it)

The kidneys have the most blood flow and are the nearest to the surface of your body. That is where to apply whatever heat source you have.

For folks who have other spending priorities or don't want to carry around heated clothing: You can get rubber 12V heating pads 4 for $17 or even less. [email protected]
 

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Lots of good advice all ready.

I'll throw in mine.

I live in the desert so I'm used to the heat. I can ride in hot weather without much drama. Solid coat, not mesh and control the airflow with the vents. Might wear a cool vest usually just squirt some water onto my chest under the jacket of course.

I always have heated grips on a bike. I've used them in the summer going over a mountain pass. Heated jacket liner and gloves in the side case all the time too. If the temps are dropping I'll pull over and put them on. Only if it's going to cold for awhile though. Fleece neck gaiter replaces my Buff in the cold.

Don't really wear thermal type underwear. My legs don't get cold normally with just jeans under my riding pants. Same with my feet, wool socks and waterproof boots.

Jacket and pants are Goretex so none of that pulling over and trying to get rain gear on when it's pouring!
 

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While still in Richland I made some evaporative cooling chaps and evaporative cooling jacket (not vest). Worked too good until it doesn't work at all. Really cold at 100 degree ambient and then all bundled up nice and warn when the water was gone. In the end I just supplemented my cooling vest with cooling pads inside the helmet and across my forearms. Still need to stop every hour or less to re-wet the stuff.

I'm still waiting on someone to come up with a cost effective solution. The personal cooling systems that are out there that work are big bucks.
The Veskimo ( now out of business ) system worked good....for a while. Their problem was thinking you have access to solid blocks of ice. I started with their system.

Now I run a "cool shirt" which gives better coverage than the vest does. I also run a home made resevoir/cooler. I could build this for $250-$325 complete. The thing that makes mine work for a motorcycle is the large cooler. Mine is a "30" can unit. Cheap as it is a fabric outer with a plastic box inside. Buy a boat bilge pump, the smallest you can find. Run the pump off a bait well timer. This timer doubles or triples the life of the ice and regulates temps. I have not found a need to go to the chaps or pants, but would be open to try that.
 

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Another vote for heated grips. My 'strom is the first bike I've had with them, will never be without them again. The beauty is they're ALWAYS on the bike, so they're there when it gets chillier than you expected. And you don't have to stop to add/remove layers, just hit a button.

My riding pants are very heavy, so legs are protected from the cold. And when it's hot, they're protected from engine heat. I've ridden in them off road in 90-degree heat with the liners in, and didn't mind. My legs aren't doing much work on the bike, so bundling them up doesn't really bother me. But I generally run cool, YMMV.

I use layers on my torso of course, but rarely have to stop to add/shed.
 
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