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The thing we all have in common here is that we ride various V-Strom motorcycles. That's where the commonality ends I suspect because we all do what we do in different environments and with different levels of experience, training, awareness & skill.

My history is almost certainly different to whatever yours is so, while I can measure my own confidence in my riding skills, it's very hard for me to estimate how confident each of you is. The reason for raising this is that, in another thread, the conversation has deviated onto whether and how any of us should be "advising" others and it seems to me that this involves confidence levels.

So ask yourselves this question: "how confident am I that I ride in the best way?" I leave to you the questions "what's the best way?" and "is there such a thing as the best way?" When you're out on the street (or trail or wherever) does everything turn out the way you think it should or are you caught out by driver misbehaviour? Are some manoeuvres less perfectly executed than others and do you notice? In short, do you ever think that maybe your performance could and should be improved?

Assuming that you're quite content with your current performance, how confident would you be in coaching another rider? If you're not content with your performance, do you actively seek guidance from others? are you happy to be guided by others?
 

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....

In short, do you ever think that maybe your performance could and should be improved?

I'm confident that I make mistakes and that I'll always have room for improvement. I took a couple MSF refresher courses this spring. My group often discusses techniques and situations.
I'm confident that I ride better than at least 50% of the riders out there.
I'm confident that I can coach other riders. One of the best ways to master a subject is to teach it, to be questioned and challenged from the student and other teachers. And to be a competent teacher one must at least understand the subject matter.
 

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Thirty years ago, when I drove a bus, one of the supervisors had a sign in his cubicle:


92 PERCENT OF ALL DRIVERS SAY THEY'RE "BETTER THAN AVERAGE."

DREAM ON, HILLBILLY!


So. I think I'm pretty-good-fine; but I don't have the stats to back it up. Except that, but for one wreck when I was a yearling rider, I've not had a bad case of road-rash; and I've probably got about 100,000 miles under my chinstrap.

I never attended the classes; I don't necessarily recommend teaching yourself but I figured it out all right. Steering, maneuvering, and avoiding the stray pothole, is just a matter of doing the dance. The machine is your partner; guide it; be one with it; know HOW to guide it, and you'll win the night's prize.

You'll get home in one piece, both of you.
 

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Why do YOU need to "estimate how confident each of you is"? Why should I care what you think of my confidence or skill level?

Coops.
 

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I'm consistently confident that I'm barely competent, so I try to be constantly conscious of my situational considerations.
You, my friend, can advise/teach me anytime, because you would make it fun and obviously don't take yourself too seriously.:smile2: Unlike some others.:frown2:

Coops.
 
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You, my friend, can advise/teach me anytime, because you would make it fun and obviously don't take yourself too seriously.:smile2: Unlike some others.:frown2:

Coops.

WOW. According to the time signatures, it took all of FIVE MINUTES for my post to travel halfway around the planet, be replied to, and come back the same distance.
 

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I bet every backyard hillbilly stuntman with a video on Youtube was supremely confident of his abilities at the point his friend lit him on fire so he could dive off the barn into a watering trough. The laws of physics usually puts the smackdown on that sort of supreme confidence.
 

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@ Pirate 650.

Humour gets to it's target much easier and quicker than dull and tedious lecturing.:wink2:

Coops.
 

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I'm a perfect balance of confidence and caution. Of course that's my opinion of myself. I learned to ride at 13 and consider myself a decent rider. I've never taken a motorcycle safety course for the same reason that a soldier who has been in combat doesn't go to boot camp plus I would probably get thrown out for disagreeing with the instructor. That doesn't mean that I'm not open to learning.
 

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Confidence in yourself and those around you is somewhat relevant. None of us are professional riders, until we can hang with Rossie or ride as below, we are only as strong as our weakest point.
Every time I'm over confident. I seem to get myself into trouble.
Cool video either way

 

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Like being "pilot in command" ....you need a certain amount of confidence to ride....every once in a while I think . "wtf am I doing here at 68 surrounded by trucks at 80 mph "....then I hit the throttle and depart the enclosure :D. I must say the CBF1000 is a treat in that regard.

As I age I lose some confidence in say stopping the bike bike smoothly in gravel so avoid situations where I might need to. IF you start to lose confidence then why ride?

I'm 50+ years with no come offs on pavement but still wear my knee armor just in case....and one never knows about construction sites.

There is a balance between confidence and skill....most young riders have too much of one and not enough of the other. I try not to get complacent tho....leads to inattention and cagers doing the damnest things catching you by surprise.

Stats show that motorcycle riders are some 20% less likely to have an accident while driving in a cage so seems the bikes improve our motor skills and situational awareness.

Still confident enough to head out for a weeks touring on my own in civiliazed regions.
Sane enough not to take the trans-Labrador with or without company.
Switching sides of the road between Canada and Australia certainly keeps me on my toes as does round abouts on 606s in Australia :D

that said ...a hesitant rider can get into a world of trouble....cagers give no thought to your space...you MUST make it.
 

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When I had been riding for 6 months I thought I was pretty good, but after 2 years I realized how bad I was at 6 months, and after 5 years of daily commuting I realized how shaky I was at 2.

Now it has been over 10 years and I go from high confidence, to low depending on how attentive I am for that ride, how tired, how distracted etc. There is always room for improvement.

Luck has a lot to do with it as well, if you go many years without an accident you are bound to feel pretty good about your skills, but the best rider can be taken out by one car at any time, and there is nothing that can be done to train you to prevent that (kid, high, stolen car, blasting through stop signs and red lights).

The best training is hours in the saddle and riding daily rain or shine. Off-road experience might save your bacon one day too.
 

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The best training is hours in the saddle and riding daily rain or shine. Off-road experience might save your bacon one day too.
yup - it is surprising how rusty you can get on the defensive riding aspect with any layoff...and all weather riding does increase your confidence level. All wanna be riders should have fun in the dirt first.
 
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