StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
560 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm committed to taking more rider training, but I have an ongoing fear of dropping the bike.

It's not that I'm overly concerned about injury, though that's always in the back of my mind. Rather, it's just that I worked and saved for a long time to get the bike I have -- I really like it and don't want to start dinging it up by dropping it. Plus, I don't know how much abuse my Givi plastic side-bags could take.

My Wee has the protection of OEM engine guards and hand guards, and that's about it.

Is there anything I can do to better protect the bike as I seek to become a better rider?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,715 Posts
Go dirt riding ...best practice for you ...softer landing
 

·
Official Stromtrooper.com Sponsor
Joined
·
5,153 Posts
This is exactly why I like to see someone on a cheap dirt bike learning to ride.

Not to say you will drop your bike. It happens to all of us at one time or another. But one drop, even sitting still, usually results in hundreds of dollars in damage. Just price a replacement side case and you will see how quick it adds up. Sure, you can live with some minor scratches and dents, but then again you saved up for this and those detract from the bike.

If you don't have a choice, just do the best you can. Wear boots that have very good traction soles. Sit on the bike without the engine running and get the feel of it. Move from side to side a bit . Easy to feel when it becomes heavy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
Dirt or grass.
Take the side bags off and get some boating side buoys (foam) to strap on to the racks. (or stuff some duffel bags with dirty clothes and strap on.)

Or you can be like me and realize "Shit is going to happen to this bike." Then let the dings and scratches act as mental trophies for "That one time!"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
788 Posts
Put some frame sliders on the bike. Take off the side-cases. Put some duct tape on the ends of the handle bars and maybe be prepared to replace the bushing at the ends (after you get past the worry about dumping the bike.) Some duct tape on the side panels, at the sticking-out parts, could help.

I like having frame sliders on my Wee because, if the bike goes down with my leg underneath on pavement, the slider ensures there is room for my leg without being pressed down by the 500 pound bike while sliding.

A point to keep in mind is that a spill during maneuvering practice is likely to be at low speed. You generally have a chance to let the bike down more gently than just letting it crash. (I speak from experience with my lesson regarding stopping hard during a slow sharp turn.)

If your concern is with crashing during high speed maneuvers, it is either overwrought or you intend to be too reckless for advice to help.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,178 Posts
My advice is to go out and drop it, then you lose the fear of dropping it.

I know, you want to be that guy that NEVER drops his bike, but you know, that is a myth, there is no such guy, we all drop it once in a while.

A scratch or two, who cares, when it gets to 40k miles you will likely sell it anyways, you can touch up any scratches then.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,463 Posts
Oem handguards suck. They are really only wind protection. Buy some bark-buster style handguards that have an aluminium bar running thru them & chincom knock-offs work well. You can pad the engine guards with split 1" rubber hose, then wrap with gorilla tape....ain't pretty, but will give lots of protection. Do you have pannier racks? If so, pad the with hose and tape too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
560 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Lots of great suggestions already -- thanks!

Can anyone recommend sliders that can be attached to the OEM engine guards? (Assuming such a thing exists)

stuff some duffel bags with dirty clothes and strap on.
This reminded me that I picked up a pair of soft bags on craigslist for $10 right after I got my bike. It was too good a deal to pass up, and I figured I might use them if I ever decided to do any mild off-road riding, instead of putting the hard Givi bags at risk. I could strap those on and fill them with clothes or other soft stuff to protect the rear of the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Plus, I don't know how much abuse my Givi plastic side-bags could take.
When my wife dropped her Kawasaki ER-6N at 10 or 15 KM/H, the Givi V35's were scratched up a bit, but that's all. That was sliding along pavement covered with gravel. They're tougher than you'd expect from plastic. But I still like the boating bouy idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
456 Posts
Does it make sense to add sliders when you already have engine guards providing what I thought is overall better protection? I never had sliders, so this is an honest question not a statement.

Agree with others here saying a little scratch or two is no big deal. My 20-year old Harley still looked “like new” to everyone but me when I sold it. It had been down a few times but only I knew where to look. Nothing ever broke. Battle scars.
 

·
Farkle Purchasing System
Joined
·
1,535 Posts
I've had the same question. There are some setups where you can have both crash bars/engine guards, AND effective sliders.

One such is the Altrider system. You put their crash bars on, and then they have a slider bar that goes through the bike's frame & lower part of the crash bars. This slider bar has plastic pucks on the ends.

The sliders are likely to hit first, in the event of a drop, lowside, etc. They transmit force first to the crash bars, rather than directly to the bike frame. The "pucks" on the ends of the slider bar are replaceable.

The crash bars do ultimately transfer force to the bike frame, since they are attached to it. However, since the lower half of the bars is not rigidly attached, there is some flex there to soak up impact. I would much rather replace or repair a set of crash bars than the bike's frame.

Altrider's is a clever system, if expensive. Available in both DL650 and DL1000 flavors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
Just get good boots and keep your feet and legs under the bike when you fall. Hurts, but the bike does not get scratched up much. Thats what I do.... :serious:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
Dropping the bike will instantly cure your "Phallophbia."
The important thing I learned about making slow tight turns, fast sweepers, or U-turns, is scan for hazards or obstacles before you enter a turn then look through the turn to where you want to end up, not where you are currently. Your brain will put the bike where you are looking, every time. If I am fixated on the rocky ditch at the edge of the apex in a turn instead of the right-of-center of the road at the end of the turn, that is precisely where I will ride to: high-sided in the ditch. I have two crushed vertebrae for proof.
U-turns are the same. For instance in a left U-turn, look back over your left shoulder, not at the sandy edge, wall, or Ferrari parked at the opposite curb, because that is where you will end up. Concentrate on where you want the bike to be not on where you are headed. This technique flat works-even feet upon the boards, two up on a Harley Road King.
Think of a quarterback throwing a pass. The ball is thrown to where the receiver will be when it should be caught, not to where the receiver is when the ball is released.
Motorcycling, like anything, takes practice
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
Dropping the bike will instantly cure your "Phallophbia."
The important thing I learned about making slow tight turns, fast sweepers, or U-turns, is scan for hazards or obstacles before you enter a turn then look through the turn to where you want to end up, not where you are currently. Your brain will put the bike where you are looking, every time. If I am fixated on the rocky ditch at the edge of the apex in a turn instead of the right-of-center of the road at the end of the turn, that is precisely where I will ride to: high-sided in the ditch. I have two crushed vertebrae for proof.
U-turns are the same. For instance in a left U-turn, look back over your left shoulder, not at the sandy edge, wall, or Ferrari parked at the opposite curb, because that is where you will end up. Concentrate on where you want the bike to be not on where you are headed. This technique flat works-even feet upon the boards, two up on a Harley Road King.
Think of a quarterback throwing a pass. The ball is thrown to where the receiver will be when it should be caught, not to where the receiver is when the ball is released.
Motorcycling, like anything, takes practice
Totally agree, this is classic motorcycle training. Look where you want to go
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
546 Posts
FWIW, my engine guard, bark busters, bash plate and Givi plastic cases have taken everything that I've given them. Sure, they're scratched. The bash plate is dented from some ledges. Parts around my center stand have a new profile. The bike has gone over 15 times (at least) So what? I am in one piece. The bike is fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,866 Posts
I don't think that any bike taking a nap is the biggest fear. It WILL happen, at one or other point in a person's biking career. The thought of any damage (cost), whether you are able to pick a fallen bike up (unaided), how you landed after the fall (personal injury) or did anyone see you fall (vanity). These, I would say, is the are the fears of falling.
For what its worth, I have survived a few unplanned falls myself, both on road and off road.
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
Top