StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
How do you desert SW riders deal with the 95-100 degree heat? I still intend to leave Washington State on Thursday of next week and head for Lake Tahoe. I figured I'll take four days to get there and then overnight for three. I am very conscientious of hydration but on a personal note, I sweat more than anybody I know and get dehydrated pretty easily as well. My goal will be to be on the bike by 7:00 and done by 2:00 or 3:00 at the latest. I typically wear a mesh jacket with a long sleeve polyester shirt that I soak in water two or three times during a ride on a hot day but I have not done ten days straight in 90+ weather. I'll hotel it at lower elevations but intend to camp while in the mountains where it will cool down in the evenings but can afford to pay for AC every night if needed; and if I can find it.

If any of you can offer suggestions I am all for it.

NC
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,543 Posts
Get a Cooling vest or jacket. Much better than a wet T shirt.
Edit: Andreas you beat me to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
894 Posts
Water, water, water and more water. You should be able to spend a lot of time riding in the higher elevations. I'm leaving Thursday from the High Desert in SoCal heading to Oregon. The first few hundred miles will be desert riding on the 395. Day two will take me past Tahoe up towards Lassen (wanted to go through the park but it may still be closed due to snow on Friday). They just opened Tioga Pass from 395 to Yosemite yesterday.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
A Camel Back works great. Stuff as much ice in as you can and then fill with water, it will last most of the day and feel like a small AC unit on your back ans think how good that ice cold water tastes!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,487 Posts
At least you can ride through the mountain area and that means a bit cooler. Avoid the central valley in Cal. Come down through Shasta and Lassen if you can. A friend just did several days in that area and said it was warm.
The camel backs with the wide opening are nice for filling with ice and water from the local hamburger spot keeps the temps at bay.
Basically it's summer and hot as heck. Enjoy as you may.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
16,615 Posts
Meh........don't buy into it, plus IB folks aren't out riding to take in the sites and actually enjoying themselves. Mesh does cover up your skin, and also keeps you from getting sunburned. I won't be wearing my Gore-Tex AD1 pants on my big West trip end of July, I will be wearing my mesh icon raiden arakis pants, with my Olympia Switchback II mesh jacket. Will have a 3L Platypus hydration pack, and a cooling towel to wrap around neck and or chest area.
 

·
Bikeless 4 now
Joined
·
1,228 Posts
As said above, no mesh jacket, a cooling vest really works great, soak a dew rag and wear it on your head and one around your neck. Block the wind, that will dehydrate you big time. If you start getting a headache you need to drink and cool down immediately. Head to the high country if you can. I rode around Phoenix at 119 degrees and it was 90 in the mountains. BTW, 100 degrees is nothing in the desert. Sunscreen on face, hands and neck. Camelbak and drink often! Gatorade mix works well. Ride safe, have fun and know the signs of heat and sun stroke!

Outbackwack
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,595 Posts
Meh........don't buy into it, plus IB folks aren't out riding to take in the sites and actually enjoying themselves. Mesh does cover up your skin, and also keeps you from getting sunburned. I won't be wearing my Gore-Tex AD1 pants on my big West trip end of July, I will be wearing my mesh icon raiden arakis pants, with my Olympia Switchback II mesh jacket. Will have a 3L Platypus hydration pack, and a cooling towel to wrap around neck and or chest area.

I'm a desert guy.

Anything over about 95 you want to block the air, really!

I wear:

Darian jacket all the vents closed and use the cuff zippers to control the air into the jacket.

Evaporative vest under the jacket when it's 100+.

I do wear mesh pants though, Olympia Airglide. There's no airflow on your thighs. They are grey not black!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
16,615 Posts
I'm a desert guy.

Anything over about 95 you want to block the air, really!

I wear:

Darian jacket all the vents closed and use the cuff zippers to control the air into the jacket.

Evaporative vest under the jacket when it's 100+.

I do wear mesh pants though, Olympia Airglide. There's no airflow on your thighs. They are grey not black!
Well.....I guess I will either find out the hard way, or me and the boys can make adjustments as needed. :smile2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,437 Posts
1--Don't wear black. No black helmet, coat, pants.
2--The ironbutt article conclusion on the last page is good. The rest seems like the author was paid by the word.
3--If you feel any way disconnected from your ride, stop. Get cool. Get water. Get rest. Stop before you crash.
4--If you aren't peeing, you're dehydrated. Rest and drink water. Lots of water.

Skin is about 93-95°F. Air hotter than that heats, doesn't cool, the skin. Limit the hot air that gets to your skin. Wear an evaporative vest, or even a water soaked sweatshirt, under a coat with limited ventilation. Ditto for an evaporative head covering under your helmet.

Drink water. Lots of water. Usually the foods we eat provides all the electrolytes we need. Sports drinks usually have too much sugar. If you want Gatorade and the rest, cut them with water. Coffee, tea, alcohol all are diuretics--they dehydrate us. Here's the Army's chart on urine color to show if you're becoming dehydrated:

https://usaphcapps.amedd.army.mil/HIOShoppingCart/Uploads/thumbnails/259A.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,047 Posts
When it got around 105 i just took off the jacket. I'm not made for high temps, so i need some air to cool off.

It's not a popular option, but it saved me from falling asleep and allowed me to reach destination.

I do need to buy a cup holder or a camel pack....


Also, like said above, at 120F dry heat it's just more bearable to zip up and close all vents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,487 Posts
Taking the jacket off you lose water more quickly. The cool vest and proper venting is a better choice.
I came through Needles, Ca, once at high temps and as I was zipping the jacket I spotted a couple on a Harley in the shade of an over pass stripping down he to the wife beater shirt and she to a tank top.
Sun and wind burn and heat exhaustion potential for the next 134 miles to Ludlow, the next opportunity for service.
Heck, I may have been wearing my old Hein Gericke Darkar black leathers at the time. Better to be covered.
Having the hydration bag in the tank bag with the tube conveniently located or use helps too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,155 Posts
I make a distinction between hot weather and medically HOT. I pretty much wear body armor all the time so mild heat is just fine because I ride without a jacket. I agree with the folks that advise to keep the wind off your skin when it is really hot to avoid dehydration. It is like riding into a heat gun. I always have a compact wind breaker jacket tucked on the bike. Coming across the Central Valley or crossing on Rt 50 I have been known to put that wind jacket on backwards.

But when I know that planning can't avoid a long stretch of wicked hot - I have a couple of large zip lock baggies for gas station ice. I slip them inside my armor over my kidneys. That is the best spot on the body for mechanical heating or cooling our blood. Likewise a hydration waist pack stuffed with ice works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,098 Posts
Been out west six times on motorcycles.114 the high temp. I soak my long arm T and even pour water all over me.Soak neck warp and dew rag all so .Fill up five or six bottles with water and stick any where around me fast to get at.Put my all ...MESH... Joe Rocket over the wet T and feels like its not on but love it.I think even more air goes thru with it on. As you go down the road and you dry out so fast drink about half a bottle and pour the other over your front and neck as you ride. At next gas stop fill all bottles up again and do same on the road.Works for me and I am old next to lots of you.:wink2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,047 Posts
Taking the jacket off you lose water more quickly.
I don't know about dehydration in the wind, but while i had the jacket on, i was pretty much constantly covered in sweat and overheating. Taking the jacket off felt like dropping 15C. I have a medium sized shield, so not a lot of wind on me to start with. Once i drank some, i was good to go. The energy drainage seemed to stop.

One thing though, i had spf50 lotion with me, it's a must :grin2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,098 Posts
In the bad heat I drink all the water I can even if not wanted.I eat less. If your pee starts being dark yellow you are drinking way too little water. We took a 22 year old kid from work with us one year.New rider ,good shape and played lots of sports and still worked out.Had a three month old new sportster he had been riding to work. We told him about the water at start.Second day he pulled over weak and not feeling good and very white for even a white boy! He said after a hour break and three bottles of water,' I was not drinking as much as you all but will from now on." He did great the next week. :smile2: Drink all you can at every stop and on the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,487 Posts
" i was pretty much constantly covered in sweat and overheating"
Didja think to open vents? If the wind is moving past sweaty stuff, there should be a cooling effect. That's the way the science is supposed to work.
So do what you need to stay comfy. To each their own!
Not a wind screen thing but my big windscreen on my BMW is a winter device, less so in the summer. I open the jacket sleeves at the wrist and put my arms in the wind flow occasionally.
Then again there is the Midwest or Hawaii or them other places that have profuse humidity and are really sucky places to ride.
Those of us in the West that have a lower humidity don't properly appreciate the argument others experience.
Kinda like the Bobo's that go to Alaska with out taking Mr Gerbing along with them.
That's what happens when a conversation goes along for a time. A different take finally becomes obvious. Some of us wear the gear, others have the need to abandon it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,047 Posts
Didja think to open vents? If the wind is moving past sweaty stuff, there should be a cooling effect. That's the way the science is supposed to work.
:frown2:

Like i posted, not a lot of airflow. My jacket has no vents, its made with gore-tex.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top