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Discussion Starter #1
I've been thinking about this for the past month--being afoot does that to you.

One of the most quintessential sayings ever uttered is "Always get right back on the horse that threw you". It has always represented something tough in our character--you can't let a trip to the ground keep you from persevering. If you're a real man or woman you get back up, dust yourself off, and give it another try until you stay in the saddle.

We've all heard it--it's All American.

Unless it's not a horse but a motorcycle.

I've had two accidents since I've been riding and have heard the same thing over and over. "You had an accident! I hope your going to give up riding motorcycles!" or "Have you learned your lesson?" or "You're not getting another bike are you?" This is almost always accompanied by a horrified look and shake of the head when I tell them that I am absolutely going to "get back in the saddle".

Each time I "kissed the concrete" I got up (luckily) and looked at my bike before I looked at myself. In each instance when I realized that the bike was probably totaled my first thought was "I gotta get another bike!" Not once has it ever occurred to me to think otherwise.

Cowboys get cheers, we get jeers.

Puzzling. (BTW State Farm called today--checks on the way and the hunt is about to begin!!):hurray:
 

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Well said. Sometimes folks do give up riding after a crash, and no one can blame them for that. But if the downed rider learns something from a crash, e.g. speed, cornering tactics, braking technique, etc. then the odds are probably better in the future.
 

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This is what separates those of us that have it in our blood from those of that want to have it in their blood. I am the first to tell someone if you don't think you should be riding then your 100% correct.

If I can walk I will ride. If I had to put a hack on one of my bikes then I could still ride. I love motorcycles they are in my blood and I am lucky enough to have a wife who has the same infection. She has been bucked off the horse and is still riding. This includes a surgery on her ankle that is still giving her some problems. But she forgets all of that the minute the motorcycle gear is on and she is off to ride somewhere.

The day may come when I pay the ultimate price for riding a motorcycle. But at least it will have been doing something I love.
 

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I've had two accidents since I've been riding
Why?

Is there anything you can do differently to extend the time to #3?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Absolutely!

I tell people that you know more or less instantly if you "have it in your blood". My first ride was on a little 175 Honda in 1974 (it had one of those big police type windscreens). I had gone less than 50 yards when I felt an almost overpowering joy flood through me--a true "I HAVE GOT TO GET ME ONE OF THESE!!" moment.

I have never gotten over it. Hopefully I never will. I hope to be that old guy they talk about--"He rode to the day he died!!"
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well, #1 happened in 1982, #2 happened a month ago. Almost 30 years between them. Seems a reasonable interval--there are two types of riders, those who have crashed and those who are going to.

#2 has cleared a massive blind spot I had concerning parking lots. I learned!!
 

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Well, #1 happened in 1982, #2 happened a month ago. Almost 30 years between them. Seems a reasonable interval--there are two types of riders, those who have crashed and those who are going to.

#2 has cleared a massive blind spot I had concerning parking lots. I learned!!
Regarding the comments about quitting...you know these are just well meaning words. They want you to know that IF you do decide to give up riding, you'll get their support.
 

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NX650 "Dominator" - not completely unlike the Wee, around 1990....50 mph off-road high side. Flying through the air at fifty miles an hour about 4 1/2 feet off the ground, an hour from home.....everything in slow motion. "Oh sh*t" then BAM. You know. Fortunately, nothing but bruises. There is a reason for ATGATT.

That crash set me back a little. 500 dollars worth of plastic damage. Sold the bike, didn't ride for awhile. Then, at a garage sale I picked up a little 200 four stroke Yamaha. Started riding trails again.....then a KX300...great fun little bike. Back in the saddle.

Then the "Beast" - my XR400. Officially back in love with motorcycles...and so the story goes. Been on dirtbikes ever since...two years ago switched to the Wee and dirtbikes combo. Now, I pretty much just ride my Wee.

All is well.
 

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I haven't crashed in 34+ years. Prior to that I crashed 50+ times. I don't know if I would continue riding if I crashed bad at this point in my life.For the past 8 years I have enjoyed riding more than my first 6 years.
I'm starting to see age limitations. They are are subtle but noticeable.


Les
 

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Crashed my tricycle- didn't give up riding it.

Crashed my pushbike, many times- didn't give up riding it.

Crashed my car [well had it crashed for me]- didn't give up driving.

Crashed my rollerblades, more than once- didn't give up.

Crashed on water skiis, more than once- didn't give up.

Crashed life- didn't give up.

Crashed my motorcycles, more than once [and had them crashed for me, twice by tintops]- still haven't given up.

If you like it, why give it up.

If we gave up every time we crashed the human race would still be living in caves and clubbing animals for food.
 
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