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Sorry, I don't have a specific number for you. But for what it's worth:

WebBikeWorld has a list of horn reviews. I've scanned through most at one point or another.

And they also have a horn comparison, though it's pretty dated at this point. See the hype vs. reality section: it illustrates the advertised dB rating is often bogus vs. real life performance. (Much of the difference may be due to manufacturers not detailing how they measure...so their measurement may be accurate, but not meaningful as a comparison against others measured differently. So it's tough to compare and know what you're getting.

The only other reasonably verifiable loudness performance I've seen is the

Keep in mind every +6 dB is roughly double the amplitude (easily measurable) and every +10 dB is roughly double the perceived loudness (varies substantially from one person to the next, and is a very complex, somewhat disputed, issue...into which I will not delve).

For my money, I want to be HEARD. So I went with the SoundBomb. It's fantastic. While some may chime in to say with air horns they have a lag between button-press and horn sound, I don't have a noticeable lag at all.

Probably more than you wanted, but I tend to ramble...
 

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Despite the nearly legendary status of the air horns, I strongly recommend going with a magnetic type. The air horns a very sensitive to failure from wind blowing past the horn. That from the owner of the company that imports the most famous air horn you see copies of here and everywhere. And a horn is something that needs to be dead reliable. So

+1 on the FIAMM freeway blaster "low tone"
 

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Get a FIAMM freeway blaster "low tone", no relay is needed and it is literally plug and play.........oh yeah nice and loud.
I think that's what I'll go with.... simple installation is king.
 

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Get a FIAMM freeway blaster "low tone", no relay is needed and it is literally plug and play.........oh yeah nice and loud.
Thanks @Big B

A louder horn is the most important change on just about any bike, it seems. Well, of those that I know, which is not very many,

I'm also very partial to plug 'n play, with no relay needed. Thanks for the recommendation.
 

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Thanks @Big B

A louder horn is the most important change on just about any bike, it seems. Well, of those that I know, which is not very many,

I'm also very partial to plug 'n play, with no relay needed. Thanks for the recommendation.
It must be a nuance of the overall polite Japanese society. The stock horn is meant to offer a courteous intimation, rather than a warning.
 

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Glad the OP got a good, easy to install recommendation.

I'll stick with my Soundbomb until it dies. ~10k miles, so far, so good. And according to my calculations it's approx twice as loud as the Fiamm Freeway Blaster Low per specs (assuming the Fiamm specs are accurate).

But...I'm adding the Freeway Blaster Low to my short list for when the Soundbomb dies. Actually, I've been thinking about adding the stock horn back into the mix. Now with Rick's comments about air horn unreliability (not the first I've seen), I think I'll go ahead so I have a backup...or maybe even add the Blaster as the backup.
 

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Also, looks compatible with mind control:
Well, that makes it a must-have in my books. 'Driven to be loud'. Hmm, I think this counters the 'polite society' thesis from @motorpsycology. They do look very happy, though. Must be one helluva horn.
 

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I have a pair of dual tone fiamm Highway blasters on my Miata and a Denali sound bomb on the Vstrom. Id go Highway blasters if I was starting over and use a relay to wire them.
There is zero lag time with the sound bomb, but I prefer the mounting, weight and sound of the highway blasters
 

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For my money, I want to be HEARD. So I went with the SoundBomb. It's fantastic. While some may chime in to say with air horns they have a lag between button-press and horn sound, I don't have a noticeable lag at all.
I agree. I have one of these. Semi-truck loud and no lag. They also sell brand / model specific mounting brackets (including V2).
 

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I got the low tone Fiamm. Key is the low tone. Motorcycles high tone horns are barely heard over someone's music with windows up.
The Fiamm is 132 db vs regular horn at 105 db. which is quite a difference.
 

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The Fiamm is 132 db vs regular horn at 105 db. which is quite a difference.
Maybe.

Short Version

The specs above aren't meaningful unless we know the distance at which they were measured. Of the horns discussed in this thread, the Denali is roughly twice as loud as the Fiamm or Hella. We don't know enough to determine how the stock horn compares.

Long Version (I warned you!)

I was incomplete in my comments earlier.

When evaluating horn dB specs, which measure sound pressure level (SPL), the dB value is meaningless without knowing the distance at which it was measured. This is due to the inverse square law. Unless we know the distance at which each horn dB spec is measured, we simply can't compare them.

For example, if we evaluate without regard for measurement distance, the Fiamm Freeway Blaster Low Tone is spec'd at 133 dB, the Denali Soundbomb is spec'd at 120 dB, and the Hella Motorcycle Disc Horn Kit is spec'd at 108 dB.

At a glance, one might think the Fiamm is strongest, the Denali is in the middle, and the Hella is the weakest. Not true!

The Fiamm spec of 133 dB is measured at 4 inches, the Denali spec of 120 dB is measured at 3 feet [36 inches], and the Hella spec of 108 dB is measured at 6.5 feet. In order to compare these two specs, we have to know the dB measurement of each horn at a common distance. Fortunately, we don't have to ask the manufacturers to re-measure, we can calculate the results. Using this handy calculator, here's how these horns compare to each other at all three distances (4", 3', and 6.5'), though calculating for any one common distance would suffice for comparison's sake.

Code:
================================
Horn    |  dB @ 4"  |  dB @ 3'  |  dB @ 6.5'
================================
Fiamm   |  132      |  113    |  106
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Denali  |  139      |  120    |  113
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Hella   |  134      |  115    |  108
-----------------------------------------
As we can see, the Denali measures 7 dB higher than the Fiamm and only 5 dB higher than the Hella, even though the specs (absent measurement distance) suggested otherwise.

Every +6 dB amounts to a doubling of the sound pressure level. So the Denali measures roughly double the SPL of the Fiamm or Hella.

(As an aside: hearing is a strange and complex thing, and is influenced by a lot of factors beyond simple dB measurements. From what I've picked up over the years as a result of an quasi-related amateur hobby, psychoacousticians consider a difference of +6 to +10 dB as a doubling of perceived loudness. There is much debate over how exactly to evaluate this doubling, since perceived loudness cannot be measured precisely. So most people and specs simply use SPL / dB and ignore "perceived loudness".)

Anyway, the takeway: the Denali is -roughly- twice as loud as the Fiamm or Hella.

Bringing this back to the stock horn...unless we know the distance at which the stock horn spec of 105 db is measured, we can't reasonably compare it against the others.

Out of curiousity's sake, does anyone know at what distance the stock horn spec of 105 dB is measured?
 

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Null13 -- I read the Hella product page -- since the page title is "two horn kit" and the specs also show the frequency for both low and high tone -- as indicating the two horn kit has a spec of 108 dB at 6.5'.

(And even if the spec of 108 dB was for one horn, SPL isn't additive. Adding a 108 dB horn to a 108 dB horn only increases the SPL +3 dB, or a total combined spec for two 108 dB horns of approximately 111 dB.)

I didn't see a reference to the specs for the single high-tone option.
 

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Unfortunately without knowing the conditions the horns were tested under you can't know for sure that that equation will work. It's just an application fo the inverse square law and does not account for differences in reflection present in the different tests. Put the same horn in the open, again with a flat reflective surface behind it, and again in a corner with three reflective surfaces and the numbers will vary by almost an order of magnitude.

Magnetic horns are so reliable that they are essentially universally used by every auto and motorcycle manufacturer in the world. Air horns are sensitive to failure from wind blowing past the horn opening at a right angle. A magnetic horn will be there when you need it. An air horn might not.
 

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Null13 -- I read the Hella product page -- since the page title is "two horn kit" and the specs also show the frequency for both low and high tone -- as indicating the two horn kit has a spec of 108 dB at 6.5'.

(And even if the spec of 108 dB was for one horn, SPL isn't additive. Adding a 108 dB horn to a 108 dB horn only increases the SPL +3 dB, or a total combined spec for two 108 dB horns of approximately 111 dB.)

I didn't see a reference to the specs for the single high-tone option.
Oh i wasn't adding the two, i was simply saying that i had two sources of same output for different tones.

:)
 
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