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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I am making a wheel balancer for 2014 vstrom 1000. I want to cut thing and mount bearing without taking my vstrom's wheels off first.
I wonder if some one can give me a clue what is the distance between bearings(a) and how deep the middle grove(b)
should be so wheel-hub would only be contact with bearings.
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None of those are critical. The side arms should be longer then the radius of the wheel. Make them long enough so you can do a 21" wheel, You never know. The distance of the bearings from each other should support the rod that goes through the wheel bearings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ok, so I need a rod through the wheel bearings. I wonder what is the diameter of motorcyle wheel bearing so I can get a rod of around that size.
I see on amazon they use 1/2 inc dia. rod. But then have spindles on that 1/2 inch rod to keep rod at the center of the wheel bearing.
 

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I researched the heck out of DIY wheel balancers, bought some high-grade bearings, built the thing, and the wheel stilled turned on the wheel bearings instead of the fancy schmancy high dollar wheel balancing set up.

Now I don't even balance my tires. I just make sure the red dot is where it should be in relation to the valve stem and ride them. Can't tell a difference in ride or wear.
 

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The rod needs to be big enough to withstand the weight of the wheel without deforming. The cones are what supports the weight of the wheel and keeps the rod centered in the wheel bearing.
 

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Make sure the spindles are a tight fit on the rod. My balancer drove me crazy because the hole in the spindles were over sized and when I tightened the set screw, the cone would be cattywampus on the rod. My neighbor put the spindles on his lathe and squared them up and then I ordered a drill rod of the appropriate size and I can finally get a good balance. Many report that the Vstrom tires don't need to be balanced but because I change tires for a bunch of my friends ( I have an automatic tire changer) , I make sure to balance each and every tire.
 

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I think there's going to be more resistance in the larger wheel bearings than in the smaller ones you find in something like a Marc Parnes balancer, since the wheel bearings are going to have a little bit of hydraulic drag from the grease that's packed into them. I don't know how much difference that would make; probably not much, but I still think you'd be more accurate with a balancer that doesn't depend on the wheel bearings. Or at least as accurate as you can be with a static balancer. Frankly, I keep telling myself that I'm not going to balance the next tire change at all, and see what happens. I end up wussing out each time because at the end of the process, it just seems like something you're supposed to do. I've read other accounts like Rick's of guys who don't balance them without any ill effects. There have been times though when I balanced a Shinko 705 and ended up using a lot of weight, and it seemed like that much of an imbalance in the tire would have been noticeable.

My Marc Parnes balancer turns on its own bearings when I balance a tire. As long as I got the cones firmly seated in the wheel bearings before I tightened them, the wheel and the axle from the balancer would turn as a unit on the balancer's bearings and not the wheel bearings.

This is the setup I built:



The frame is made out of a 2x4, and it clamps into my ancient Black and Decker Workmate. The Mark Parnes balancer sits on top, and the bearings are held onto the upright 2x4's by some clamps made from angle aluminum. The web strap just keeps the balancer attached to the frame while the unit is in storage. For fifty bucks though you could buy one from Harbor Freight that's self contained, and would no doubt work just fine. You'd probably have half that much into just buying a steel rod or tube and bearings, plus whatever materials you get for a stand.


If I wanted to be as quick and dirty as could, I'd skip buying a tube to use as a through axle and just balance it using the bike's axle, sitting on top of whatever is high enough to give the wheel enough clearance to rotate.
 

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For balancing the front, install the wheel but not the caliper(s), put the bike on the center stand and and put a bag of dog food on the tail of the bike to lift the front wheel off the ground. Straighten the handlebars and see where the wheel stops. Your forks and axle are built in static balancers.

For balancing the rear, Install the wheel minus the caliper and chain and see where the wheel stops. Your swingarm and axle are built in static balancers.

Honestly just install the tires and go ride. I bet you'd not know the difference between balanced and unbalanced tars!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
For balancing the front, install the wheel but not the caliper(s), put the bike on the center stand and and put a bag of dog food on the tail of the bike to lift the front wheel off the ground. Straighten the handlebars and see where the wheel stops. Your forks and axle are built in static balancers.

For balancing the rear, Install the wheel minus the caliper and chain and see where the wheel stops. Your swingarm and axle are built in static balancers.

Honestly just install the tires and go ride. I bet you'd not know the difference between balanced and unbalanced tars!
I researched the heck out of DIY wheel balancers, bought some high-grade bearings, built the thing, and the wheel stilled turned on the wheel bearings instead of the fancy schmancy high dollar wheel balancing set up.

Now I don't even balance my tires. I just make sure the red dot is where it should be in relation to the valve stem and ride them. Can't tell a difference in ride or wear.
now these are my type of solutions. I think I will test a bit after mounting the tires/wheel on the bike. Or test them on wheel bearings.
 
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