StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Found this hitch ramp on Wholesale Motorsports Accessories "600 Lb Capacity Steel Harley Street Bike Motorcycle Tow Hitch Carrier Rack with Loading Ramp". It looks pretty good. I have the 650 Wee and would be attaching it to a new Ford Ranger. Wondering if anyone in the forum has used this ramp or one like it. I bought one a number of years ago for my son's 450 Yamaha dirt bike and it did the job on the back of an Outback Subaru. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,895 Posts
A picture or a link would help?

If it one of those that go into the receiver and the bike hangs off the back of the vehicle, not for me. Too much weight hanging way past the rear wheels for my liking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
I've used a similar hitch carrier before to haul a Suzuki SP600 and a Honda XR650 on the back of a 1/2-ton Dodge pickup and I can't even imagine using one to haul a 650 VStrom on the back of a Ford Ranger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
The capacity for the carrier and your hitch are pretty much "static" ratings. All that changes when you're driving down the road and hit bumps, etc. A "600-pound" load can quickly become an 1800-pound load when affected by g-forces. I found that even on my 1/2-ton pickup, it threw my headlight beams high at night and gave a general uneasy feeling of "lightness" in the front end. I used mine for a couple of years and even had an extra leaf spring installed on my rear axle. That helped with the "squat," but made the ride a lot rougher when I wasn't using the carrier. Then there's also the issue that anything above the size of a small dirt bike is probably going to completely obscure your vehicle's tail lights.

Even if the chance of failure is small, you also have to consider how catastrophic the consequences of a failure could be. If the thing fails on the highway and your bike and carrier depart your vehicle and strike another vehicle behind you or passing you, you could wind up going to prison for awhile if you kill somebody. When I used mine, I actually passed a large log chain through the frame of the motorcycle and to the frame of my vehicle, independent of the carrier. That way if it did fail, at least the whole shebang might flail around shedding a few parts as it was dragged behind me until I could stop, not the whole motorcycle. I also welded my factory receiver instead of relying on the bolts it was attached with.

So, in the end, yeah, I used one with 350-pound bikes on a fairly substantial vehicle, but I wouldn't do it again. In my opinion, just too risky for any motorcycle over 200 pounds no matter what the rating of the hitch and carrier are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the feedback. That's why this forum is so great. Sorry for not posting pics or a link. Here is the link: 600 Lb Capacity Harley Street Dirt Bike Motorcycle Hitch Carrier - WMA. I should have mentioned that the Ranger is being pulled behind a diesel motorhome. My original plan was to buy some decent ramps and a wheel chock and load the bike in the bed of the truck. More expensive but a better solution. Money wasn't the object. It would be nice to use the bed of the truck for storage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
302 Posts
When towing you don’t want more Weight behind the rear axle you want it over the axle or in front of the axle. When you have to much weight on the back you will end up with the tail wagging the dog. If you have the bike behind the pick up and the pick up connected to the motorhome the truck can fell like it’s shifting back and forth, because it will be. Your motorhome is large enough that you may not loose control, but you will feel it and like an unbalanced tire at certain speeds it will be worse. It can be bad enough that you might loose control of the motorhome.

I saw a motorhome towing a Honda Civic, there was a motorcycle in between the two.
The bike “Kaw dresser” behind the motorhome on a special carrier similar to the one you posted. And then the car. The bike carrier was attached by several 2“ receivers points.
Sorry no pictures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,156 Posts
Nope Nope Nope !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Not Gonna Do It, Wouldn't Be Prudent!!!
274835
 
  • Like
Reactions: Motorpsychology

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
When it comes to hitch carriers, the claimed weight capacity of the carrier is secondary to the actual weight rating of the vehicle hitch receiver. Nearly all Cat3 and Cat4 receivers, most common on 1/2 ton and 3/4 ton pickups, are rated at 500# load, with a max of 600# in a few HD applications. Add up the weight of the carrier, which is likely at least 60-75#, and the weight of the bike--in this case, your Vstrom which certainly goes a minimum of 500# in street form--and you're way over the receiver weight limit. Cat3-4 receivers can be rated as high as 1100# load WITH A WEIGHT-EQUALIZING HITCH, but that rating is not applicable to the type of use you want. For carrying lighter scooters, dirt bikes, and small street bikes that weigh 300-350# max, I'd say you'd be safe. I would not do what you are proposing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
Also saw the ramp capacity is 400#.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
660 Posts
Nope Nope Nope !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Not Gonna Do It, Wouldn't Be Prudent!!!
View attachment 274835
I've been noodling the whole drive-it-there-and-ride approach for a while, too. I am now a septuagenarian (Latin for geezer), and would druther drive a comfy pickup a time zone away, ride some back country, then load up and drive home.
I am unclear on the concept here. I've had experience driving a flatbed truck empty with a side mount forklift dangling off the back, and I will not drive with that kind of weight distribution ever again. Tongue weight is not the same as suspended weight; there is no weight carried by another axle behind the receiver.
Isn't it possible to load the 'Strom in the box, along with other gear, and any excess in the super- or crew cab? A DL650 with a 61.4"/1560mm WB & 89.6"/2275mm OAL situated diagonally in the box should fit, even in a 61"/1549mm crew cab box, and an additional ~20"/510mm tailgate down, maybe a box extender; 72.8"/1849mm for a super cab plus 20" tailgate. I'm using 2017-20 DL650 and 2019-20 Ford Ranger dimensions.

274899
This 3 piece foldable ramp is only $20USD more than the hitch carrier above and is sold by the same seller.* Stores easily in the box with plenty of room left for other gear.
For me, I may also consider renting an MC trailer to tow the bike, but as a septu, uh, geezer, I don't want to hassle with towing a trailer. I pulled them for a living, I don't want to pay to do it now.

*They show that it is currently out of stock
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,156 Posts
I have a multipurpose 4'x8' trailer that I have set up for hauling my bike. I also lowered the bed from the stock position by moving the axle from under to over the leaf springs. Installed a removable* Baxley front wheel chock and tie down eyes. Easy to load and offload using a 7' arched motorcycle ramp. Works Great!!!
274908

* Allows the trailer to be used for most any type of utility hauling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
726 Posts
Yeah, these hitch carriers, especially if hung on a single receiver, look decidedly dodgy to me. Maybe OK for putting a cooler or a mobility scooter on, but 500 lbs of bike? Yikes, no.

I'd say spring for some decent ramps and put it in the back of the truck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
I've used one for a 600lb interceptor for many long road trips in the mountains on an F150 and it's fine if rigged well. For the heavier bikes I've trimmed the length of the hitch post so that it slides in really tight to the truck and used an anti-rattle shim to minimize the bounce. With that configuration, I could stand on the ramp with bike, and bounce the truck until the suspension bottomed out, and it was totally solid. The strom was even lighter, and it was fine. I would definitely take care on bumps, and wouldn't do it off pavement. I've hauled my XR600 dirt bike on washboard that way, but it's only 300-ish lb. And make sure you use a class 4 hitch if you can to allow for the extra tongue weight. That could bend/crack over time and it's not as easy to inspect as the carrier itself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Thanks everybody for your responses. The best solution to carrying a motorcycle behind a motorhome with a car or truck towed behind is a hydraulic lift placed between the mh and vehicle. It's a very expensive alternative and requires a lot of notifications of the mh. I was planning to buy good ramps and a wheel chock and walk the bike up in gear. I've done the same with several much heavier BMWs using an 8 ft bed Tundra and it works well. BTW I have a 6 foot bed Ranger and I will need to keep the tailgate down when transporting the bike. I'm a "full timer" so it's great to have my WeeStrom with me wherever we go. My wife takes off in the truck and I escape on the motorcycle. Saves a marriage!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
just finished a 2500 mile trip thru az, co and ut with my '06 E350 ford van pulling a jayco tt that has an advertised 750# tongue weight (i'll take their word for it). i decided to use a 600# rated hitch carrier on the tt to bring a 270# klx250 along. the receiver on the trailer looked sturdy enough. i figured with all the tongue weight, it'd be ok. NEVER AGAIN! on a smooth road, it was acceptable, but you could feel and see a slight wag on the trailer that if you were not paying attention, could cause big trouble.
biggest problem was the undulating pavement on us 191 (formerly us 666:devilish:) caused the hitch to act as a lever that taxed "big blue" (my van) to its limits. stressful times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
just finished a 2500 mile trip thru az, co and ut with my '06 E350 ford van pulling a jayco tt that has an advertised 750# tongue weight (i'll take their word for it). i decided to use a 600# rated hitch carrier on the tt to bring a 270# klx250 along. the receiver on the trailer looked sturdy enough. i figured with all the tongue weight, it'd be ok. NEVER AGAIN! on a smooth road, it was acceptable, but you could feel and see a slight wag on the trailer that if you were not paying attention, could cause big trouble.
biggest problem was the undulating pavement on us 191 (formerly us 666:devilish:) caused the hitch to act as a lever that taxed "big blue" (my van) to its limits. stressful times.
Did you have an equalizing hitch?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Did you have an equalizing hitch?
never needed one with this van. it's heavy duty enough as a one ton that loads don't bother it. the extra weight hanging that far back would amplify the undulations of the crummy roads. it would have helped on the sway, but that was manageable by either accelerating or riding the trailer brake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
never needed one with this van. it's heavy duty enough as a one ton that loads don't bother it. the extra weight hanging that far back would amplify the undulations of the crummy roads. it would have helped on the sway, but that was manageable by either accelerating or riding the trailer brake.
We have a 24' toy hauler/command trailer in a SAR Team I manage, and it makes a big difference when we load a few heavier items in the very back, like our 250lb roll-off 4K generators. The equalizer, plus moving the rest of the interior load as far forward as we can makes a big difference. Even with a heavy 3500 Dodge mega cab with canopy and cargo, trying to run that way without the eq hitch is unnerving to say the least. That leverage of an unbalanced rear load can't be understated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
when i bought this trailer used, it came with an equalizing hitch (po pulled it with an suv). granted, the trailer wasn't loaded, nor was the van, but when i got home, i took it off and just used a sway bar and never noticed any difference. all previous trips were fine, but the bike usually rides in the van.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I have a Silverado 2500HD and borrowed a friend's hitch carrier for my DR650. I have to tell you, it was scary. I arrived at the destination with the carrier and bike still attached, but you can see the bike move -- a lot -- in the rear-view mirror. Because it's only attached to the truck at one point, it just wants to rotate all the time and it's only the fact that the hitch point is a 4" square that keeps it from doing that. I just had visions of watching my bike bouncing down the road at 65 mph and going through some poor hapless soul's windshield after a bad bounce.

Ultimately, I fabricated a removable winch mount from some steel tubing and an electric winch from Harbor Freight. I connect the winch to my battery for power, and it has a remote control so I can just ease it up the ramp. And if things start to go south, I just release the button and the bike is held in place on the ramp while I sort things out.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top