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After many (many) safe years of accident free riding my number finally came up. Last week I was riding home down a country lane about 9:30 at night. I stopped at a stop sign and waited for a car to pass by so I could pull out and wham; next thing I knew I was laying under a dead Wee. I never saw or heard the approaching car. My nice Wee strom, with flashing LED brake lights, me with a bright yellow helmet and reflective yellow jacket, and she "thought" I had pulled out. She was looking at the passing car and decided to pull forward, thinking I had gone ahead. I was furious, how stupid and inattentive can you get. I was told "don't get mad". So what am I supposed to "get". The outcome was that I was OK, just a bruised knee where the frame hit me. My crash guards saved the bike, no damage from the fall. The fender was hit and the tire actually absorbed the total impact. No damage. I've ridden over 100 miles and its fine. The unfortunate thing is that I no longer feel safe, even with all my gear and the precautions I take. I consider this a cheap lesson. While there wasn't much I could have done to prevent this one, it tells me that there is always a chance for improvement.
 

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Keep riding.....your experience is one I worry about so in traffic I stay glued to the rear view mirror even when braking heavily....I know I can stop because I leave enough space but the bozo behind me.......

Glad all okay.....thinks I should get the frame guards......
 

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People make mistakes, forgive and forget.

My theory is that now that you've been rear ended you're are statistically less likely to have it happen again.
 

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The more I hear about occurrences like this the more it supports my theory that there are legions of incompetent and inattentive motorists that make "safe riding" less in the hands of skilled defensive motorcyclists and more of a "roll of the dice", pertaining to who happens to be driving behind you at any given time. In my opinion, tailgating should be ticketed more severely than speeding.

K
 

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luck? or skill?

The more I hear about occurrences like this the more it supports my theory that there are legions of incompetent and inattentive motorists that make "safe riding" less in the hands of skilled defensive motorcyclists and more of a "roll of the dice", pertaining to who happens to be driving behind you at any given time.
I cannot argue that such a view is false, but I see it as overly fatalistic. There will be unforseen instances of reckless or oblivious driving which make luck a factor in a rider's continuing bodily integrity and survival. But the extent to which instances of bad driving are unforseen is very much in the rider's sphere of control. I consider it a personal error of mine when some driver does something which requires me to make an unplanned evasion maneuver. The standard I try hard to maintain is that I have a plan for every vehicle which is or soon will be in a position to hurt me. Nearly always, when I have to evade, I am simply executing a plan already formed for the contingency that actually develops. In dense urban traffic, it is a mental challenge, but I figure it's the best use of the lump of neurons consuming a quarter of my energy.

Yes, luck can be a factor, but only to the extent one has failed to anticipate the unfortunate actions of others or poor road conditions. We should never settle for luck playing a big part in our own safety. As has often been said, they (meaning some drivers or riders) are out to get us, but their success is still largely in our hands.

In my opinion, tailgating should be ticketed more severely than speeding.
Maybe so. But in the meantime, I will rely on myself rather than any uncertain deterrence. I may fail, but it will not be due to any complacent fatalism.
 

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many of us have faced motorists who lack some basic mental workings and have the scars to show for it.

glad this was a slow speed incident and you survived. I hope law enforcement was involved so the driver pays some price for putting your life at risk.
 

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People make mistakes, forgive and forget.

My theory is that now that you've been rear ended you're are statistically less likely to have it happen again.
No way. Folks in four wheel vehicles feel they can be inattentive while driving because they are protected by the 4000lb of steel around them. If they were on a bicycle or motorcycle they wouldn't be so careless. How many people that ride motorcycles have hit a motorcyclist? I've been hit from behind twice at red lights while on a motorcycle.
 

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I cannot argue that such a view is false, but I see it as overly fatalistic. There will be unforseen instances of reckless or oblivious driving which make luck a factor in a rider's continuing bodily integrity and survival. But the extent to which instances of bad driving are unforseen is very much in the rider's sphere of control. I consider it a personal error of mine when some driver does something which requires me to make an unplanned evasion maneuver. The standard I try hard to maintain is that I have a plan for every vehicle which is or soon will be in a position to hurt me. Nearly always, when I have to evade, I am simply executing a plan already formed for the contingency that actually develops. In dense urban traffic, it is a mental challenge, but I figure it's the best use of the lump of neurons consuming a quarter of my energy.

Yes, luck can be a factor, but only to the extent one has failed to anticipate the unfortunate actions of others or poor road conditions. We should never settle for luck playing a big part in our own safety. As has often been said, they (meaning some drivers or riders) are out to get us, but their success is still largely in our hands.


Maybe so. But in the meantime, I will rely on myself rather than any uncertain deterrence. I may fail, but it will not be due to any complacent fatalism.

I am intrigued by your statements, Sir, and would like to subscribe to your newsletter. :fineprint:

I see it the exact same way as you. Counting on any other vehicle on the road to be a willing participant in my continued safety seems to me to be like a soldier in combat anticipating that perhaps the other guys shooting skills are lacking. Why would I trust that? :confused:
 

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Several years ago there was a stat that indicated more MC hit from behind at stops than cars turning left in to them (excluding dumb stuff drinking and riding) these are the two most frequent accidents. The rear end hits were hypothetically attributed to cell phone distraction. That is hand held units, blue tooth units and also in dash phones. Researchers have also found folks on cell phones (again any type usage) were as impaired as DWI. If I were still practicing I would investigate neuroimaging and cell phone cortical involvement, probably been done with interesting results. Now off the soap box and on to lunch.
 

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I cannot argue that such a view is false, but I see it as overly fatalistic. There will be unforseen instances of reckless or oblivious driving which make luck a factor in a rider's continuing bodily integrity and survival. But the extent to which instances of bad driving are unforseen is very much in the rider's sphere of control. I consider it a personal error of mine when some driver does something which requires me to make an unplanned evasion maneuver. The standard I try hard to maintain is that I have a plan for every vehicle which is or soon will be in a position to hurt me. Nearly always, when I have to evade, I am simply executing a plan already formed for the contingency that actually develops. In dense urban traffic, it is a mental challenge, but I figure it's the best use of the lump of neurons consuming a quarter of my energy.

Yes, luck can be a factor, but only to the extent one has failed to anticipate the unfortunate actions of others or poor road conditions. We should never settle for luck playing a big part in our own safety. As has often been said, they (meaning some drivers or riders) are out to get us, but their success is still largely in our hands.


Maybe so. But in the meantime, I will rely on myself rather than any uncertain deterrence. I may fail, but it will not be due to any complacent fatalism.


You can do everything right and still get killed. Stuff happens.

Personally I can't keep 100% mental focus on anything riding included. People do not multitask they shift from task to task. You may think that you can ride, scan, plan and react all at the same time but the reality is that you can't. Not to mention reaction time.

The best solution for me is ride smart, keep an eye on the others, wear gear and then let it go. I don't run scenarios of all the possible situations. I don't attribute malice to people's mistakes unless they demonstrate otherwise. Most people are not out to kill you.

I ride because I enjoy it. I accept that it's dangerous but I don't let that take the fun out of it.
 

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No way. Folks in four wheel vehicles feel they can be inattentive while driving because they are protected by the 4000lb of steel around them. If they were on a bicycle or motorcycle they wouldn't be so careless. How many people that ride motorcycles have hit a motorcyclist? I've been hit from behind twice at red lights while on a motorcycle.
Valid point, riders and drivers tend to have different levels of attention. You don't see many riders texting or performing other tasks while riding, yet this is common behavior for drivers. Whether this is because of perceived security within their cage or simply the ability to keep the vehicle rolling while performing other tasks . . . I have no clue.

You can take all the precautions in the world and some idiot will still find a way to get to you. The safest bike is the one you never ride.
 

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Glad that your somewhat ok! I didn't come out that good. I was hit from behind while traveling 55 mph. The guy that hit me must have been going at least 70. I flew off the bike, through the right lane of traffic. Still don't know how I didn't get run over. I slid 150 feet on my back, ending up on the side of the road. My bike and small camping went another 100 feet past me, totaled in the ditch. The trailer took the impact, probably saved my life. My ST1100, my trailer, and all riding gear were trash. I had three broken ribs, contusion to my right lung, and a broken right scaphoid. Bibs healed over time as did the contusion. Finally had to have surgery on the scaphoid. Took some neighboring bone tissue and put it in the break and then a screw to hold it. I was out of commission for a whole year. But with as many bikes that I've had plus all the miles I've ridden, I'm now back on 4 wheels. Yup, a 02 Gold Wing ABS and my 2012 VStrom 650 Adventure. My property damage was taken care of by his insurance and after a long battle with his insurance company, finally received my pain and suffering plus had to pay back Medicare and TriCare for Life.
 

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You can do everything right and still get killed. Stuff happens.
Yes, of course. It is folly to think otherwise.

Personally I can't keep 100% mental focus on anything riding included. People do not multitask they shift from task to task. You may think that you can ride, scan, plan and react all at the same time but the reality is that you can't. Not to mention reaction time.
It is important to recognize one's own limitations. I am only claiming that many of the hazards that befall riders are susceptible to mitigation or avoidance with forethought and adaptation.

The best solution for me is ride smart, keep an eye on the others, wear gear and then let it go. I don't run scenarios of all the possible situations. I don't attribute malice to people's mistakes unless they demonstrate otherwise. Most people are not out to kill you.

I ride because I enjoy it. I accept that it's dangerous but I don't let that take the fun out of it.
In urban traffic, I get my fun out of playing the "Dodge cagers and live." game. On country-side rides, I more enjoy scenery and smells with less attention paid to traffic (except for deer and elk.) Running scenarios can be part of the fun with the attitude that it is not too much trouble. I'm not saying how you or anybody else should be using your noggin -- just that treating hazards fatalistically is a matter of choice and degree.
 

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Nothing makes me rage faster than a tailgater. I usually just pull over and let them by while displaying the number of legitimate parents they posses.

I have been rear ended 9 times in the past 20 years. all but one of them I saw coming because the person in my rear view was riding my ass for a time before the incident. the one I didn't see coming was the one on my bike. I was sitting still and the traffic behind me had stopped. the light turned green and the guy behind me just punched it and tried to drive through me.

I had a tough time getting my confidence back, a go pro camera and adding flashing rear lights helped me get back in my groove. I ended up on my feet somehow rather than under the bike.
 

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Man what the hell is wrong with people? Why do so many people have a complete disregard for others safety? To the OP, thank God she didn't bump you into the intersection when another car was flying by. Glad you are safe.

I don't have a flashing rear brake light but I do flash it myself when sitting still at a light or stop sign. I constantly look behind me and leave the bike in gear in case I have to go quickly. I have a big fear of being hit from behind. It's really the only time I feel 100% vulnerable on the bike.
 
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