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Discussion Starter #1
The more I ride my 2104 DL1000 the more I think it's the bike and not me. When I am riding at higher rates of speeds (70mph+) on turns like highway interchanges it can be rather white knuckling at times especially if there is a little wind. The other day I was riding during a heavy wind and was quite frightening! The bike drifts, the winds do what they want with me and I have to do all I can to keep a line. I know it has a higher center of gravity but my BMW 800GS didn't do this...

I have been reading some blogs that a fork brace may help. Anyone know where I can get a fork brace for a DL1000 2014? I do have a mid sized v-screen aftermarket windscreen, could that be causing it? I'm tempted to put my stock back on to test it out.
 

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Hi Steve, I find that this bike is very stable even in cross winds. So, the explanation may be somewhere else. Is it possible that you have too much preload in the rear shock? My brother had that problem on the highway to Las Vegas (three years ago). He was scared to keep up with the traffic as his bike was too unstable. We stopped and reduced the preload on the rear of the bike and the problem was solved. Might be worth a try?
 

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Could that windscreen be lightening the front end? I don't have any issues with my Airstream screen.

Tire pressure is set correctly right?

When I ride in high winds I don't push it, take it slow and make it home, more important.
 

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something is wrong with your bike - or it's just you. The vee2 is very stable, even at triple digits. Now, the 650 is a different story. That bike could get a little sketchy at speed, with cross winds, buffeting from trucks, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I only weigh 155lbs so I have my front set one up from all soft and my rear on all soft. A friend of mine suggested tightening up the fronts a bit more. I just got to thinking the forks may be flexing independently back and forth which would cause the front wheel to micro turn back and forth. Only mods I have done that may change aerodynamics is the medium windscreen and rear top pack. I always check tire PSI so that is good. I have noticed its not bad on flat payment street curves so perhaps the rain drainage groves on the concrete affect this bike more? I'll try a few things like tighten up the front and remove the rear top pack.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It is not possible to use a fork brace on an upside down fork.

My Vee2 is very stable. Wind or not.

What changes have you made to bike?
Never thought about the USD fork issue. I guess the brace would have to be so high to clear the travel that it would be useless. No major mods other than windscreen and top box.
 

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As was said previously in this thread just relax and let the bike move around. The tighter you hold the bars the more you will struggle with the bike.

In heavy cross-winds I **literally** lock the throttle and let go of the bars as I am amazed at how stable my 201 DL1000 (and my previous DL650's) is in cross winds.

..Tom
 

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The top box can't help, especially if you put any appreciable weight in it. Also wonder with the rain grooves what kind of tires you're on. The stock Battle Wings shouldn't have a problem there, but other tires might.

I agree with the other writers here that this is generally quite a stable bike in crosswinds. I took mine through Wyoming, South Dakota, and Montana last autumn and encountered fierce crosswinds. No real problems apart from the noise and the some dancing around--it did better than my old R1100GS.
 

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The top box can't help, especially if you put any appreciable weight in it. Also wonder with the rain grooves what kind of tires you're on. The stock Battle Wings shouldn't have a problem there, but other tires might.

I agree with the other writers here that this is generally quite a stable bike in crosswinds. I took mine through Wyoming, South Dakota, and Montana last autumn and encountered fierce crosswinds. No real problems apart from the noise and the some dancing around--it did better than my old R1100GS.
I can confirm that weight in the top box can change handling quite a lot, particularly if you don't use saddle bags to keep weight down low.
 

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The aftermarket screens don't have all that much effect on crosswinds. Remember, the screens just don't present much "area" to push on from the side! When an owner blames an aftermarket windscreen for problems, they would find the stock screen would likely act nearly the same in the SAME conditions. The top box could make a difference and would be easy to remove and try without it!

I get wicked cross winds and turbulence here along the Gulf Coast. We have flyovers that are 4 levels high. Yes, I get a gust of wind that moves the bike. Just relax and give it a chance to correct itself. They will do that if you don't fight them.
 

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Fwiw I always have a top box mounted on the bike. I don't see it making any difference in crosswinds since have no challenge in crosswinds at all.

This may sound wrong to many but, for a given side profile, having weight up high helps in crosswinds. It will slow don't the bike's reaction to gusts and make riding in winds even more enjoyable.

..Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I agree it's a very stable bike in all other situations. I push it hard, ride with the sports bikers (crazy best buddy has an R1) and love to hear that little peg protector drag. :) The suspension is the best performing suspension I have ridden on an adventure bike by far. The winds beat me up bad on some days and I have no problem relaxing and letting the bike do what it wants to do. I trust the bike and my riding ability. After talking it out here on the forum I'm thinking it may just be the rain groves because I have not experienced it on paved surfaces. Here in Phoenix they love to carve the slabs deep with them on the curved, banked flyovers. I will tighten up the front a bit to see what happens.
 

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I have fun on my V2 in gusty winds. I like it. Important point above. Don't fight the wind. Allow the bike to move around a bit under your stable upper body. Countersteer into gusts; if a gust comes from the right, push forward with your right hand. Keep your vision well down the road. If you look down at the road you seem to be moving much more and over correct.

"I only weigh 155lbs so I have my front set one up from all soft and my rear on all soft. A friend of mine suggested tightening up the fronts a bit more."

Set the sag. A helper is a big help. Wrap a cable tie around one inner fork tube. On the stand raise the front tire off the ground and set the tie up against the fork. Off the stand, get on wearing your full riding gear, just tap your toes to center the bike, jiggle a bit to settle the suspension. Get off and raise the front again. Measure how much the cable tie got pushed down. Adjust the preload it to get 30 - 40 mm of sag. Try again until it's right. Preload doesn't make the suspension stiffer or softer. It raises or lowers the spring mount to get the bike in the right position for the rider's weight. On the rear, raise the rear off the ground, measure from the axle to a point on the fender. Get on, jiggle, measure again. Adjust the preload for that 30 - 40 mm.

The front forks rebound adjusters are at the tops of the forks. Back off all the way, count the clicks all the way to full on, back off half the number of clicks. Do the same for the compression adjusters down by the front axle. Rebound is how fast the dampers extend. Compression is how fast they compress. Ride a moderately bumpy road. Back out the compression adjusters two clicks at a time until it feels mushy, tighten one click at a time until it feels good. Back out the rebound adjusters two clicks at a time until it feels bouncy, tighten one click at a time until it feels good. Do the same with the rebound adjuster on the rear.
 
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