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Discussion Starter #1
In general I strongly dislike riding on Interstate Highways (or equivalent.) I just find them soul-siucking, boring, and annoying especially with other vehicles on the highway. So apart from the 20 or so minutes of Super-Highway on my daily commute I really avoid them as much as possible.

Sometimes though it is really the only sensible way to make time or to cover longer distances or avoid busy metropolitain areas and it just isn't practical to avoid it.

So this Sunday my wife and were finishing a 4,400 km/ 2700 mile ride down thorugh Ohio then to North Carolina and back. She was on her Gladius, me on my 2012 DL650. Both were reasonably loaded. On Sunday we wanted to get home and had about 480 km or 295 miles to get there. Not a big deal but to head to our home east of the Greater Toronto Area the only sensible way to go is all expressways. So the last 300 km/ 190 miles were spent mainly riding at 75 to 85 mph with occasional sputs up to about 90 mph.

As much has I dislike the superhighways, it never fails to amaze me at how nice these bikes go as this speed and how much power the motor seems to have. It gets so smooth in the 6000 to 7000 rpm range and just feels like it was meant to be there all day. It shouldn't really surprise me as two years ago I rode from Utah to the Greater Toronto area in about 2.5 days. Most of that 3,200 km/2,000 mile ride on my 2006 DL650 was at 75 to 90 mph.

Anyway just wanted to comment on how nice these bikes are to ride!

..Tom
 

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+1 on the soul suckiness of the Interstate System. I avoid them even when I drive my truck. I do find that there are ranges where my '08 Wee is more comfortable - around the indicated speeds of 70mph and 80mph I believe. Gets a little "buzzy" in between...
 

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I agree 100% Tom. Makes the notion that anyone NEEDS anything bigger than a 650CC motor, dubious. Zero to 60 in 4 seconds is fast enough for me, thank you.

That and the 6 speed transmission make the stock front sprocket and gearing fine. I had a 16T front on my bike when I bought it and first gear was just TOO tall. I put the stock sprocket back on and the bike just felt happier all around. I noticed and appreciated the closer gear spacing immediately. I don't need 6th gear until I'm doing 60 mph and turning 5k in 5th. I seldom feel the need to exceed 8k when shifting up or passing - and I get a consistent 53 mpg.

If someone gave me an F700 GS or the new DL1000 with traction control, I wouldn't turn it down. Its just that a smile on your face is, by any other name, a smile on your face, and I already have one :thumbup:
 

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I hardly ever make the exception, but I rode the slab recently on a trip from CO Sprg. up through Ft. Collins. I got off onto a two-lane north of Denver that paralleled the Interstate, but I quickly realized it would take forever because it was still too urban and I needed to go 500 miles that day.
 

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Very few bikes can cruise interstates, be a great commuter and run on dirt roads while doing all it so well, and none can match the price. Interstates suck all the joy out of riding but sometimes its the best thing to do.
 

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Boy, impatience is a plague on you. Needed to bursts of 90 mph? or was that Canadian 90 kpm?
I can run all day long at 70 or less and the occasional run to 75 if it's posted. I guess being older has taken some of the urgency to go fast to be replaced with the urgency to go to the bathroom. Oh, just dang!
Oh, I like the interstates for going places at a constant speed without worrying about animals being a hazard, not that that doesn't happen.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
No not impatient. 75 to 90 MPH were the speeds needed to not be run over. That's only 120 to 145 kph which are pretty normal speeds on the highways on which I commute to work. (Real speeds as per GPS.) I wouldn't be alive riding over 30,000 miles per year if I was impatient.

And I'm old enough to be completely conversant in Imperial units (and also US Gallons.)

..Tom
 

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I've recently done a few hours of highway travel on my Glee, and I noticed I kept slowing down. ... as in, I'd throttle up to 65mph and hold it there. Some minutes later I'd notice my speed had dropped to 55-58mph, so I'd give it more throttle get back up to 65mph. A little while later I'd be slowed down again.

I found it very hard to hold a steady pace without a lot of monitoring the speedo/ GPS and correcting. It happened in both directions, so I don't think it was related a long climb. Never noticed this on my Vee, only the 650.
 

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Hey Tom, last time I was in Ontario I remember seeing signs about getting your vehicle impounded and/or losing your license, for speeding above a certain amount- is that for real, or is it just to keep us tourists in line? :fineprint: Seems pretty harsh!
 

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Hey Tom, last time I was in Ontario I remember seeing signs about getting your vehicle impounded and/or losing your license, for speeding above a certain amount- is that for real, or is it just to keep us tourists in line? :fineprint: Seems pretty harsh!
50 km/hr over (30 mph) and you lose you license and vehicle for a week on the spot. No judge, no jury, no appeal.

..Tom
 

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No not impatient. 75 to 90 MPH were the speeds needed to not be run over. That's only 120 to 145 kph which are pretty normal speeds on the highways on which I commute to work. (Real speeds as per GPS.) I wouldn't be alive riding over 30,000 miles per year if I was impatient.

[...]
Sounds reasonable. Here in South Orange County, 80-85 mph seems to be the norm, which is why I would have to crank it up to 85 mph (indicated, no GPS ... yet) just to stay away from the usual psychos. Ironically, it is safer to be in the diamond lane (HOV) because drivers here tend to be single-occupants and I can travel at more moderate speeds (~75-80 mph indicated).



Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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I get the impression that most feel that extended runs in the 6k-7k rpm range isn't hard on the motor? You will have to forgive me, this is the first high reving motor I've owned. All my thumpers would just laugh at me if I asked them to run that high for very long.

BTW...I agree that for the most part, running at a speed to keep with traffic, no matter how fast, is safer than running the speed limit that is 20 mph slower.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I get the impression that most feel that extended runs in the 6k-7k rpm range isn't hard on the motor?
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My 2006 has over 202,000 km or almost 126,000 miles. It has done a lot of continuous riding over 6,000 rpm and doesn't seem affected by it. It uses oil when run coniuously at that rev which meant at the end of an 800 mile day running steadily at those speeds on temperatures around 90 degrees F I would have to top up the oil.

I think these engines love being used hard.

..Tom
 

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No not impatient. 75 to 90 MPH were the speeds needed to not be run over. That's only 120 to 145 kph which are pretty normal speeds on the highways on which I commute to work. (Real speeds as per GPS.) I wouldn't be alive riding over 30,000 miles per year if I was impatient.

And I'm old enough to be completely conversant in Imperial units (and also US Gallons.)

..Tom


The slabs around my house have a 75 posted on the sign. If you're not going 80-90 you're getting run over.

I'll assume this is also "indicated" on the Vs speedo when it's known to be optimistic.
 

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As I noticed on an Iron Butt ride I did on 9/1, MPG drops a LOT at high speeds. Whereas I normally get about 55, the Saddlesore averaged 45.8 and on the fastest leg dropped to 38.5. That included side bags and a dry bag, adding quite a bit of wind drag.

Lost a bit of oil too, but was never topped out on speed. Full report here:

F*** the roses, I'll smell 'em when I get to Montana - ADVrider
 

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Ironicly, I had to run up the interstate at lunch today...30 miles each way. Tried to keep it at 75, but it kept creaping up. Averaged between 75 and 80 the whole way. With the 16t it was turning about 5500 or so. Purred like a kitten and still got 55mpg out, and 50 back (headwind). I'm still not a fan of the superslab, but it isn't too bad.
 

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I recently completed a trip with my new 14t front sprocket and found it to be just fine at the aforementioned speeds. I, too, eschew the Interstate System for secondary, tertiary and tetrinary roads, but found myself doing about a third of this 2,000-mile trip to and around the Sunshine State on the Slab.

At one point a Sherrif's Patrol pulled up alongside me slowed down to a speed I slowed to match and then he sped off. I like to think he was giving me a warning. My speedo wasn't working and there was no other traffic but I was in sixth at about 7,000 RPM for at least half an hour before I had to re-set the cruise control to 6,500 RPM.

The bike with some 93,000 miles on it ran like I was holding it back.
 

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"75 to 90 MPH were the speeds needed to not be run over."

I've heard that lame litany for years, all balderdash! If you ride the slow lane even the trucks will go around you if they need to. I was never run over riding my sidecar rig pulling the tent trailer. I haven't had anyone force me off the road because I wasn't fastest vehicle on the highway.
Guys race the SV650's so I guess the engine is built to run at or near red line for extended periods. You really think running at half of red line is going to matter to our engines?
Only thing that limits the speed you might ride is the posted speed limit and the potential for speed wobbles mentioned by those that have experienced them at the upper limit the engine will run.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
"75 to 90 MPH were the speeds needed to not be run over."

I've heard that lame litany for years, all balderdash! If you ride the slow lane even the trucks will go around you if they need to. I was never run over riding my sidecar rig pulling the tent trailer. I haven't had anyone force me off the road because I wasn't fastest vehicle on the highway.
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Feel free to ride how you like and I appreciate that you keep to the right!

For me I feel more in control when I am looking in front of me at what traffic is doing rather than continuously watching the mirrors for vehicles coming up on me from behind. On top of that the roads around are very poorly designed: right lanes come and go. If you ride (or drive) properly in the right lane then you have to keep moving over and on top of that drivers don't know how to merge anymore. If you stay right cars in the middle lane cut across two or three lanes of traffic and might hit you. (Police here warned that it is becoming a big issue on our 400 series highways which are like Interstates.) If you want to be in the left two lanes you have to go much faster than the limit or be continuously holding up traffic and causing all kinds of sudden moves around you.

Keep in mind that our 401 has more traffic than LA and the drivers are not nearly as courtious. Hwy 5 in LA while riding an ST1300 two-up seemed very relaxing.. especially once I got the hang of lane splitting.

..Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #20
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At one point a Sherrif's Patrol pulled up alongside me slowed down to a speed I slowed to match and then he sped off.
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That made me think of the story in Top gear where they were comparing Transit from London to Monaco with driving an Astin Martin Vantage. Evidently in France they were driving over 100 mph and a local police pulled up alongside them. The officer asked if they could go faster!

..Tom
 
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