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Discussion Starter #1
I've read so many opinions on brake pads, I decided to do some research:

According to EBC, HH pads are easy on rotors:
http://www.ebcbrakes.com/mcstreetpads.html
(attached image is from their website)

According to Galfer, HH pads provide the highest friction and:
"This new compound is also easier on the rotors than most other sintered metallic compound brake pads."
http://www.galferusa.com/html/new_pads.html
The HH pads are the Galfer recommended pads for the Vstrom.
 

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I'm running the EBC HH's - and I love them. Significant increase in "bite" over the stock ones.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Different manufacturers and different items within a manufacturing line have different HH pad materials. EBC HH pads are recommended for stock rotors. One of the Galfer HH pads will destroy stock rotors and don't work well unless hot. They are designed for race bikes with high carbon steel rotors instead of the usual mild or stainless. Check the manufacturer's recommendations.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I said "one of the". To be specific, the BRO3GH is not recommended for stock rotors. There is more than one HH rated pad. Galfer also makes rotors to work with the BRO3GH series. Avoid racing pads with stock rotors. Check the manufacturer's recommendation for their specific line of pad to fit your bike, riding style, and rotor material.

Page 23 lists a size, not a rating. See http://www.onlineparts.com/GALFER+FRONT+BRAKE+PADS+[FD179].html for ratings on one of the sizes listed.
 

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The FD179 and FD174 refer to sizes. Both are available in black and green as well as HH. The 1396 is an a new HH rated pad acceptable for stock rotors. The BR03 is not. Older Galfer HH pads would also destroy rotors. Galfer is good at providing warnings with pads that should not be used with stock rotors on street bikes. Just follow the manufacturer's warnings and be aware there are different compounds avialable.
 

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So, if I may, what y'all are saying is that a pad upgrade from stock will provide a higher level of braking performance, even if I don't upgrade to braided steel brake lines?

This would be nice, for there are times when I feel the stockers aren't bringing my 220 pound carcass to a halt as quickly as I'd like.

Previous bike had a full set (3) of Brembo Gold brakes w/ steel lines, and after a fresh tune up of the system as maintenance, those brakes could bring a charging hippopotamus to a halt on a dime. So, getting used to the 650's brakes has been a series of minor lessons.

Steve.
 

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So, if I may, what y'all are saying is that a pad upgrade from stock will provide a higher level of braking performance, even if I don't upgrade to braided steel brake lines?
Yep, that's exactly what I'm sayin... :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
...a pad upgrade from stock will provide a higher level of braking performance, even if I don't upgrade to braided steel brake lines?........
No. My experience with new HH pads and braided lines (all from Galfer) has been less than phenomenal. An improvement, but not huge. The lines probably did more than the pads, resulted in a firmer brake lever feel. But initial bite is only slightly better than stock (the stock pads are Tokico sintered). Overall power is slightly better than stock. I cleaned the rotors with 600 grit, made no difference.

Like you, me and my luggage weigh 250lbs. When I have to brake hard, the brakes require too much lever effort (too much for a modern dual-disc setup). They get the job done, but...

Maybe the DP pads would have been a better choice. These are highly rated by strommers on vstrom.info. Why don't you try the DP pads and report back.

But my gut feeling is the master cylinder piston is designed intentionally large (lower fluid pressure for any particular brake lever force). Maybe Suzuki thought a powerful brake was too much considering the soft long-travel suspension, etc.
 

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RatherBe,

Modern is a point of interest to me. My one of my last bikes was a VFR that had 3 pots for every rotor.

I think the Strom (too lazy to walk out in the garage) has twin pots on the front and single pot on the rear.

Granted, I am limited on my Hydraulic knowledge, as I have only taken a couple of Navy courses on it. However, it seems that the real limiting factor are the calipers.

I'll be honest, I really liked the VFR's brakes, they were superior... if what you are looking for is quick stopping (and by the way the VFR is a heavy girl for a sportbike).

If you ride off road, you would really not like that "quick bite"...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
....I think the Strom (too lazy to walk out in the garage) has twin pots on the front and single pot on the rear..........

If you ride off road, you would really not like that "quick bite"...
Yes, two pots, so the Wee will never be a Ducati in the brakes dept. But I have a Hawk with a single two-pot that brakes just as hard as the wee. I think the Wee could be somewhat better (less lever effort). Not sure how to get there. On gravel/dirt, I use the rear brake.
 
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