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Discussion Starter #1
Is there a simple tire kit so that I can repair a blow out on my Vee? I have a center stand, but have never repaired a tubeless tire before. I keep going to places I really shouldn't with my Vee :mrgreen:.... and one of these, probably as far away from civilization as possible, I know I will end up with a flat. Was also wondering to repair a tubeless tire if one actually needs to pull it off the rim?
 

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slime tire repair kit

i dont have one yet but its a mini electric air pump for motorbikes that comes with slime you add into the air valve , they also have tire plugs as well , its compact enough to fit in the under seat storage area , as for a full on tire blow out im not sure if its true or not , if you had tire irons and broke the bead you could stuff the tire full of road side dry grass or what ever too try too protect the wheel as you limp the bike back too help on the flat tire
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I like the idea of the mini electric pump with slime. Never even heard of one with slime before, but if temporarily fixes a leak, then worth getting one.
 

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I picked up one of these (or similar)...

http://www.canadiantire.ca/browse/product_detail.jsp?FOLDER<>folder_id=1408474396672501&bmUID=1195821292971&PRODUCT<>prd_id=845524443282587&assortment=primary&fromSearch=true

(and it just happens to be on sale for 50% off :-D)

and it fits way in the back of the underseat storage compartment, just in front of the taillight. I then picked up one of those gooey-string plug kits and stuffed it back there too. I've used mine once so far and it worked fine. Actually saved me a bunch of hassle. Most bike shops, around here anyway, will refuse to repair bike tires. The plug worked fine until I could order in a replacement tire that fit and was what I wanted, instead of just taking what they had in stock or parking the bike. It also provided a little security when my wife and I rode from Ontario to BC.
 

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Newfoundlander,

how the hell is sooo clean your bike?

You either don't ride it and keep it in your bedroom, or you wash it twice a day totally disassembling.
Nearly 10,000 miles in six months, actually.

I have one clean bike, and one dirty bike. The Strom is the clean-machine and the DRZ400 is my dirty girl.

:mrgreen:
 

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Take out the tool kit, that comes with the bike, and you will find enough room behind it to store your compressor. My entire tire repair kit fits in the back and the tool kit fits in its normal spot. I have a speedo healer and an aux fuse box in my under-seat storage, and, with the tire repair kit, the original tool kit and some extra tools, there is still room for more junk.



Fix the tire on the bike.

Here's everything you need...

 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Hey, thanks for all the great ideas! Compressor and some sticks looks like the easy way out for me and gives me some assurance that I can get back from wherever I am going. BTW, it is obvious that most of you here are really prepared for just about everything! Nice to know you all do more than just ride your bikes and actually take time to prepare for the unexpected. There is nothing worse than riding out in the boondocks unprepared and then hearing the painful hiss of air escaping from one of the tires. :) Thanks again for the help and I just went to Canadian Tire and picked up one of those $9.99 compressors.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Newfoundler: where did you get that 12V power outlet from?
 

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Plugs work!

I was riding with Newfoundlander, in and around St. John's, on July 1 2007. The next day, I rode to Bay Roberts Newfoundland. I was watching some barn-sized icebergs and chatting with a local gent. "We call them growlers," he said, explaining that they make noise when they roll over or grate along the bottom.

At that moment the berg groaned and rolled over. I think the fellow had a remote control for the berg stashed in his pocket. He pointed to my front tire and said I had some metal on it. We looked closely, and sure enough there was a screwhead sticking out of my new (well, new in Toronto) Tourance tire. I rode slowly and carefully back into the Metropolis of Bay Roberts and found another Suzuki rider. I asked him for advice, and he thought for a moment and asked me to follow him.

After a few minutes we arrived at a garage where several fellows were fixing or servicing their bikes and cars. "Hey, byes, can someone plug a tire for this come-from away?" said my guide, and several of them pulled out kits like Newfoundlander's (but without the shine and glitter). One man plugged my tire, and I had to struggle to convince him to accept a fee. The plug was not beautiful, except in the way it worked. It stayed with me, let out no air at all, and took me all the way back to the big smoke, 2700 miles from the point of repair!

Works for me!

Keith

P.S. Outlets like Newfoundlander's can be found at Canadian Tire for about $12.95 + 14% Harmonized Tax (that's what GST+PST is called in Newfoundland and Labrador, eh).
 

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I got my repair kit from http://www.CyclePumps.com for $35. Yeah, you could do something similar for a little less money, but aside from not including a reaming tool, it does the job. 12V compressor, sticky string repair kit, some tools and all bundled in a decent bag that fits under the VStrom seat.
 

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I carry just a regular string type tire plugging kit like you'd get at any automotive store. Around town I don't carry air, but on the road, I carry a bicycle pump, and co2 cartridges.

3 Weeks ago I went to Chipotle to get a burrito. The shopping center was under construction and I picked up a nail in the parking lot. I actually felt it puncture the tire. I stopped, got the kit out, pulled out the nail, and plugged it. Rode back to work, and then 20 miles home. When I check the air pressure that evening, I'd lost 5lbs of air from the nail, the reamer, and the plug.


I like tubeless tires..

..Though that ended up being a 120$ burrito, as I've now replaced the front tourance with only 3000 miles on it. :(
 

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Discussion Starter #17
P.S. Outlets like Newfoundlander's can be found at Canadian Tire for about $12.95 + 14% Harmonized Tax (that's what GST+PST is called in Newfoundland and Labrador, eh).
I should have known, thanks! I love tubeless now after reading more about them.
 

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He ain't the only one

Those 12-volt outlets have spring-loaded covers, so they probably keep the weather out very well. I saw one of those outlets on V-Tom's bike, and I know motoxusa (call him Lou) has one as well, but he didn't get it from Canadian Tire.

I plan to mount a 12-volt outlet, but I expect to be a tad lazier than Newfoundlander and V-Tom. I will get a 12-volt extension, and put the female part inside the black panel by my left knee. That way I can just bend the panel a bit and let the outlet drop out. I often carry cargo on the seat, so I don't want to unload the cargo and remove the seat to get at my 12-volt outlet.

Here it is: http://www.canadiantire.ca/browse/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCT<>prd_id=845524442424479&FOLDER<>folder_id=1408474396672501&bmUID=1196141813292&deptid=1408474396672395&ctgrid=1408474396672396&subctgrid=1408474396672501

If that's too long to use, search for Product #37-4474-2

It won't be weatherproof, but it won't be out in the weather. If it blows a fuse, I will put a cork in it.

For me, that's frequently good advice. So long.

Keith
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks Keith! I live only a few blocks from Canadian Tire and am a regular guest there. Looked for it 2 days ago there but could not find that day, but will look again.
 

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I thought I *was* pretty lazy on how I mounted it.. a simple "L" bracket mounted on the left side of the handlebar using the bolt that holds the cable guide, and a bolt to hold the outlet to the guide.

..Tom

Those 12-volt outlets have spring-loaded covers, so they probably keep the weather out very well. I saw one of those outlets on V-Tom's bike, and I know motoxusa (call him Lou) has one as well, but he didn't get it from Canadian Tire.

I plan to mount a 12-volt outlet, but I expect to be a tad lazier than Newfoundlander and V-Tom. I will get a 12-volt extension, and put the female part inside the black panel by my left knee. That way I can just bend the panel a bit and let the outlet drop out. I often carry cargo on the seat, so I don't want to unload the cargo and remove the seat to get at my 12-volt outlet.

Here it is: http://www.canadiantire.ca/browse/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCT<>prd_id=845524442424479&FOLDER<>folder_id=1408474396672501&bmUID=1196141813292&deptid=1408474396672395&ctgrid=1408474396672396&subctgrid=1408474396672501

If that's too long to use, search for Product #37-4474-2

It won't be weatherproof, but it won't be out in the weather. If it blows a fuse, I will put a cork in it.

For me, that's frequently good advice. So long.

Keith
 
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