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Discussion Starter #1
I ordered up a set of Goodridge Speed Bleeders and attempted to install them today. I put the first one in and I must have over-tightened it, because it sheared off. Here's the result:

I still have the original bleeder to put back in, but I can't think of a way to remove the bit that's stuck inside. I'm reluctant to use a reverse drill bit or EZ Out, because I don't want to get any metal bits in my brake system.

Any ideas?
 

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Bummer! Normally once the bolt head shears off there is very little or not torque on the remaining bit; however, the bleeder stops against the inside and the head carries no torque at all. So it is not only stuck in there but tightly stuck in there... Not that you didn't already know that, but I think you are going to have to use some rather forceful mechanical means to remove it (short of replacing the caliper).

When I have tried to cut/thread metal that was at the end of an oil galley (i.e. metal bits inside are total unacceptable), the technique I used was to go somewhere upstream and attach a hose barb to my air compressor. Then apply a minimal yet adequate continuous air flow such that as you cut the metal chunks are blown back into your face. For your situation this would mean getting an old brake line or any compatible banjo nut, remove the hydraulic line from your bike and install the banjo in its place. Then attach a compressed air source and try working with an EZ out or reverse drill (whichever can get the best grip, cuz it'll be tight). In theory, any metal chunks should be forced outward by the compressed air. Caution is warranted to not mess up the inside of the calipers, but they are used to extreme pressures anyway. Just be sure not to get anything in there that isn't brake fluid.

The only other suggestion I would venture is to disassemble the caliper, get that little bugger out by any means necessary and then carefully clean and rebuild the caliper.
 

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Use the spiral type easy out rather than the fluted for less chance of generating metal filings. For peace of mind you can inspect the piece after to see if any metal was removed. Also you could remove the caliper and do it with the caliper upside down.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I think I'm going to try the EZ Out first and, if that fails, I can remove the bolt the bleeder screw goes into and replace the whole thing. No disassembly of the caliper required. Then, do a good flush & bleed.

Anyone see any potential problems with that plan?
 

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I think I'm going to try the EZ Out first and, if that fails, I can remove the bolt the bleeder screw goes into and replace the whole thing. No disassembly of the caliper required. Then, do a good flush & bleed.



Anyone see any potential problems with that plan?


A picture might be helpful. This makes it sound like you broke the speed bleeder in half. If you remove the whole thing will your original bleeder screw into the caliper?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
A picture might be helpful. This makes it sound like you broke the speed bleeder in half. If you remove the whole thing will your original bleeder screw into the caliper?

Yes, I did break the Speed Bleeder in half. If I remove the part still in the hydraulic connector, I imagine the original bleeder screw can be put back in place (unless I somehow damage the threads).

I tried to imbed an image to my original post using a technique I've done without problem many times in the past, but for some reason this time it blows the photo up way too big. If anyone has a link to how one attaches thumbnail images, I can try that.
 

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Click the "go advanced" button. There is a drag and drop (hasn't always worked for me) or there is a "manage attachments" button where you can select and upload. There are size limitations, but I find that if I text the photo to myself my phone will resize it adequately and then I can "save to device" and upload the resized one just fine...
 

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Ez-Out first and it should just grip and unwind the thing.

Just don't leave it sitting for a year and flush the brake fluid once done. Brake fluid slurps water from the air like crazy and gets quite corrosive when it does that.

And you aren't the first to have that happen with speed bleeders - but I would suggest holding the threaded end of the other speed bleeder up against the removed one and checking that the threads match, there are several thread types and using the wrong one will almost always result in breaking the speed-bleeder when you try to install it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well, the EZ-Out was a bust. The ball bearing for the Speed Bleeder's check valve fills the hollow center of the bleeder screw and I can't push it in enough for the extractor to bite.

I also tried getting a grip on the little bit of exposed thread with a pliers, but that didn't work either -- not enough to grip.

I tried extracting the ball bearing with a magnet, to no avail.

Unless someone has a better idea, my next plan is to simply remove and replace the unit the bleeder screws into (don't know what it's called; Bike Bandit schematics simply refer to it as a "union") and start from scratch.

As for the Speed Bleeder size, I think I got that right. The Goodridge site doesn't list any DL650s past '09 -- I have a 2012. Advice given here on the site says the SB7100S is the swap out, but the SB7100 will work (The 'S' designation denotes a shorter profile). I ordered off Amazon (had a gift card) and the 7100S wasn't available, so I got the 7100. I compared it with the OE bleeder screw when I removed it and, other than being a bit longer, it looked like a match.

Oh, and thanks to the previous instruction, I figured out how to post an image as a thumbnail.
 

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Well, the EZ-Out was a bust. The ball bearing for the Speed Bleeder's check valve fills the hollow center of the bleeder screw and I can't push it in enough for the extractor to bite.

I also tried getting a grip on the little bit of exposed thread with a pliers, but that didn't work either -- not enough to grip.

I tried extracting the ball bearing with a magnet, to no avail.

Unless someone has a better idea, my next plan is to simply remove and replace the unit the bleeder screws into (don't know what it's called; Bike Bandit schematics simply refer to it as a "union") and start from scratch.

As for the Speed Bleeder size, I think I got that right. The Goodridge site doesn't list any DL650s past '09 -- I have a 2012. Advice given here on the site says the SB7100S is the swap out, but the SB7100 will work (The 'S' designation denotes a shorter profile). I ordered off Amazon (had a gift card) and the 7100S wasn't available, so I got the 7100. I compared it with the OE bleeder screw when I removed it and, other than being a bit longer, it looked like a match.

Oh, and thanks to the previous instruction, I figured out how to post an image as a thumbnail.
that is not the location of the bleeder on my 16
thats a bango bolt
 

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Below is an image of a 2012 DL650 LH front brake caliper - which by the look of your image is the problem caliper.





As you can see OEM the banjo bolt does not house the bleeder. In fact the bleeder is way up high near the top of the caliper because that's where any air will most likely accumulate.

Are you the original owner? and is there another bleed nipple on top of the caliper - just beneath the reflector? If there is (and there should be) I would suggest just purchasing an OEM banjo bolt and bleed the system using the correct bleeder. Put a new speed bleeder there if you want.

The torque for the banjo bolt is 16.5 ft lbs, which is very modest. The bleed screw torque is not quoted but is certainly much less - barely more than hand tight.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Brockie, you may have just cracked the case.

First, to answer your question: No, I'm not the original owner. I purchased the bike a little over a year ago and this 'simple' brake fluid replacement is one of the first projects I've done on it. Those screws at the top of the caliper must be the ones I should be replacing with the Speed Bleeders, I assume.

However, my bike has an additional bleeder screw where the left hydraulic line connects with the caliper. Either in haste or oversight, that's the one where I installed (and broke) the Speed Bleeder.

This solves an additional mystery -- I tried to order a replacement part from Bike Bandit for the bit that broken bleeder screw is stuck in. My plan was to simply replace that part and install -- more gently -- a new SB into that. But when I ordered the part and received a standard banjo bolt. I thought either BB screwed up my order or I ordered the wrong part. A review of the parts schematic confirms that should be simply a banjo bolt. For whatever reason, I have to assume the previous owner installed the additional bleeder.

The good news is that I think I have all the parts I need to do the fix. I figure I can pull the non-OEM bleeder assembly and put the new banjo in its place. And I already received 2 new Speed Bleeders (ordered when I broke the first one), so I will hopefully be able to swap out the correct bleeder screws without issue. Do a proper bleed and I'll be done.

Theoretically.
 

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Great. It seems like a PO issue. I have never had speed bleeders so I cannot speculate as to why he must have drilled and tapped your banjo bolt. Surely there must also be a matching one on the RH caliper.

It is best to leave it alone and use the location of the OEM bleeder - otherwise you will never change the fluid trapped in each caliper - or remove any possible airlock from the highest part of the caliper.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Surely there must also be a matching one on the RH caliper.
You would think, but no. RH has the OEM set-up with a standard banjo bolt.
 

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My sv650 manual shows torque for front bleeder valve is 5.5 lb-ft, rear 4.3 lb-ft. Probably the same for the strom, as the calipers are the same.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks. I put thinks back together this morning. The new banjo bolt leaked a bit at first, but I gave it a little twist and it was fine.

And the Speed Bleeders worked like a charm. Bleeding both sides took about 5 minutes.

I still have to replace the rear bleeder; a project for another day.
 
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