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When I was deciding between the 650 and 1000. I tried throwing my leg over each, as if getting on and off of the bike.
The 650 was a little lower and just easier to mont and dismount. Both are great bikes and both can do what you have described.
 

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You can buy an older Vee for around $3,000 with under 50,000 miles. Barely broken in for a Strom. Mine is an '06 1000 with 65000 miles and is likely worth less than that and yet I would not hesitate to take it across the country and have on a few occasions. Longest day was about 16 hours. I just wanted to get home near Seattle from Havre Montana on the "high line", through Glacier National Park.
I ride two up quite a bit. We weigh about 300 pounds, combined. Plus luggage and even camping gear on one trip. I've had the bike about 12 years and still love it. I lube the chain when it's convenient. Remember, you are really just lubing the sprockets for the most part with an O ring chain. Try an old Vee first and if you like it you can always upgrade. Some dealerships have one or two year old new bikes, as mentioned by you and others, at great prices. They all have comfortable suspension and require a minimum of maintenance. Many of the new 1000s don't run well at low throttle and RPM. Thank you EPA. You can get the ECU tweaked or there are aftermarket devices you can get to correct that. If your new one has the problem, get it cured right away. Only for your peace of mind and to make the bike more fun to ride around town. That's the biggest potential problem there is with a Vee. The 650s seem to run well out of the box. As mentioned before, start with an old one and if you like it, you'll LOVE a newer one with better suspension, etc.
 

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That's also a good approach tho not sure I'd go much further back than 2010 with ABS especially for two up. There are tons of good used Vstroms with excellent farkles.



2014 Vstrom 1000 SE ABS - $10,500 5959 km Must sell due to age and health. This fantastic bike has all the important features you need for any adventure. It has the full set of Suzuki panniers, top box and tank bag, which are quality items. Additional added accessories are: -SW Motech crash bars and skid plate. -Amazon highway pegs. -brand new Sargent seat, which is absolutely wonderful for comfort and quality. -new Vstream sport touring wind screen, to completely solve the buffeting with the stock screen. -new Anlas Capra X tires which are excellent on pavement and gravel. -2” Rox riser’s installed complete with longer break lines. -included with the stock low mileage tires, stock wind screen, stock brake lines, and shop manual.
https://www.kijiji.ca/v-sport-touring/tricities-pitt-maple/vstrom-1000-2014/1460973505?enableSearchNavigationFlag=true

nother good one



https://www.kijiji.ca/v-sport-touring/victoria-bc/2015-vstrom-1000/1459832602?enableSearchNavigationFlag=true

and despite no ABS this would be a good start
https://www.kijiji.ca/v-sport-touring/prince-george/2008-suzuki-vstrom-1000/1457635445?enableSearchNavigationFlag=true
 

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If you are patient, a good used 2014 or newer 1000 will come available, the 2014 and newer Vee has traction control, ABS, trip computer, and motor upgrades. I found a 2014 in Reno with about 6,000 miles, all dealer maintenance records, luggage and other nice add-ons for under $7,000. It made for a nice weekend too, drove wife's car to Reno spent the weekend, bought the bike, and followed my wife home on it.
 

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Don’t limit yourself to one brand or manufacturer. If you have around 5K cash saved you’ll be poised to jump on a lot of good deals. Lots of folks don’t have cash set back but they can get financing because basically anyone can get a loan . so they overbuy because the bank qualifies them for more than they can afford and they spend every penny the bank will loan them. because that can’t disciple themselves to save money there are not competing against you.This works in your favor when nice bike in the 5K range present themselves a good portion of the buying public sector is eliminated. I bought a 2007 R1200GS with lots of high end farkled for $5.500. I then sold off all the fluff I did not want and ended up with a fully outfitted GS with Ohlins shocks and 31,000 miles for $3,800.
 

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Not to discourage you from getting a 'strom, but if you like cruisers, get a cruiser. Adv bikes might be the hot trend these days, but who cares? Get the ride that works for you. Love my Vstrom, but that doesn't mean it's the right bike for everybody. That said, it does sound like a Vstrom 1000 would work well for you and the missus.
 

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Back to the bike. How far have you guys travelled solo or double on a V-Strom.
In a day, it would be about 14 hours, both solo and with my girl on the back. That's a long day two up.That's not highway time, so mileage was only about 500 miles. The 650 serves us well for riding back roads. For the highway, the 1000 would work well.
 

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Did a 6 day road trip recently, 200-300 miles a day, mostly on slow, curvy roads, so 5-8 hours of seat time. Butt was a bit sore at the end of each day, but not too bad. I have the stock seat. I'm 5'10, feel like the 650 fits me pretty well.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Not to discourage you from getting a 'strom, but if you like cruisers, get a cruiser. Adv bikes might be the hot trend these days, but who cares? Get the ride that works for you. Love my Vstrom, but that doesn't mean it's the right bike for everybody. That said, it does sound like a Vstrom 1000 would work well for you and the missus.
That is definitely a thought too. There are lots of low mileage cruisers than can be bought for less than 1/2 the price of a new vstrom.

Thoughts on these:

Suzuki M90
Suzuki M50
Shadow 750 or 1100
Vtx 1300
Vstar 950 of 1100
Vulcan 900

These are a few that I’ve seen lots of. Some with under 5000km. Some with almost 40,000
 

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That is definitely a thought too. There are lots of low mileage cruisers than can be bought for less than 1/2 the price of a new vstrom.

Thoughts on these:

Suzuki M90
Suzuki M50
Shadow 750 or 1100
Vtx 1300
Vstar 950 of 1100
Vulcan 900

These are a few that I’ve seen lots of. Some with under 5000km. Some with almost 40,000
If you're going on the highway with a V-Twin cruiser you really should be looking at ones bigger than 1000 cc (well over, really) - especially if you'll do any two-up stuff. Anything smaller will get old pretty fast.

Could be better to regain experience on a cruiser over a higher and more top heavy ADV bike. Buy it cheap, ride it for a year, then sell it and move up.

Cheers,
Glenn
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Thanks. Buying something with the intention of trading within a couple years will make it easier to not have the perfect bike right now. Riding double-yes I definitely want to ride with my wife but should definitely do a few solo miles first. And if I’m a little underpowered I’m ok with that for short term.
 

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You're going to find out lots of things when you get back to motorcycling. The intent now may to be ride mostly highways but you may find that once you get your feet wet that highways are of little or no interest and scenic back roads are now more to your liking. The style of bike is also going to be up for debate. What you once likes decades later is likely to have changed. The good news is you are going about it 100% correct. Collecting cash, researching and asking questions. All too often we get new members that start out with the opening line I bought a DLXXX for $X,XXX did I get a good deal? At that point the bell cannot be unrung.

I encourage you to join many bike specific sites and ask questions to help you narrow down your search. I also encourage you to do to many dealerships (do not take any cash or a credit card with you to limit impulse buys) and sit on as many bikes as possible and test drive if they'll let you. Also do not buy any bike the day you test ride or look at it imposed a 48 hour cooling off period to think about it. Shop alone. Dealers also love to get wives involved. Once they hear "honey I like this one" its over. They'll use your wife against you. Dealers once they get you into the shop there job is to get you to fall in love and commit that day doing and impulse buy. They what you to buy with your heart without giving it thought. Its and age old sales tactic that is so simple and effective it'll work until the end of time.

Another tactic is if you are looking at a bike and want to think about it they tell you someone else is scheduled to come in to look at the same bike in a few hours. When this happens I stop looking at that bike and move along. When the sales person asks why I'm no longer interested I tell them if the other person does not end up buying it to call me and I might come back and relook at it. This is nothing more than another sales tactic to get you to commit before the other guy (there was no other guy) swoops in and buys it out from under you. Most likely if you stay in the store long enough the sales person will step away for a few minutes than come back and tell you the other guy called and cannot make it in today so if you want to look at the bike lets walk over.
 

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Back to the bike. How far have you guys travelled solo or double on a V-Strom.
Solo, but loaded for motorcamping camping on my trips. Usually I cover 5k miles over 3 weeks. Just got home from a short of 3,400 miles in 11 days. Then regular run around riding the rest of the year between 4 and 6 K.

I lube the chain twice a day and a centerstand makes the job easy.

A Super Tenere also fits your parameters and it's shaft drive so I would test ride one along with the DL1000.
 

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You're going to find out lots of things when you get back to motorcycling. The intent now may to be ride mostly highways but you may find that once you get your feet wet that highways are of little or no interest and scenic back roads are now more to your liking.
Really good point. When I started riding after a 20-year break, I bought an SV650, for a number of reasons. Loved it, but there's a ton of unpaved roads to explore where I now live, and the SV is not the bike for that. I didn't have a lot invested in the SV, so trading it for a Vstrom a year later was painless.
 

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When I got back into riding bought a 2008 Suzuki C90T, great bike, but took an advanced riding course to get back up to speed. Went into the interior to visit my cousin in Vernon and came back with a list of wants/needs. Since the bike would not appreciate with any upgrades, looked for another bike to tour cruise on. Next was an '08 Honda GW 1800, course again as this was a different bike as well. Next due to a reassessment of my retirement life, an '85 Honda GW 1200 Limited Edition (fuel injected - prefer over carbs). Sold the 1800 and bought a '95 1500. better fit and very comfortable cruiser - getting collectors plates next year for inexpensive insurance. Both the '85 and '95 are good touring machines, and the '85 is a great around town bike as well, rather sporty with the upgrades I've done.

Enter the adventure sport touring bike - a 2012 DL1000. Bought in Toronto and rode across Canada. Was very interested in why so many of this type of bike was being bought especially by the older crowd. Researched it and finally had to do it or stop looking. I now understand the attraction. It's also a comfortable two up ride. I'm 6'2 220 lbs and the Mrs is 5'3" and ...... Lots of room for two up riding, and power to spare. It's 350 lighter than my '95 Goldwing and 250 lbs lighter than my '85 Goldwing, and it's lots of fun. We think this will become our day and weekend tripper, won't be replacing the Goldwings for extended touring.

Weight of the bike is an issue for a lot of people. Something to keep in mind especially if most of your riding is solo and around town. I don't mind my Goldwings, but a lot of people think these are too big and heavy; however, only heavy when you stop.

When I test rode a 2018 DL1000, and after having rode to the dealer on my 1500, I found the DL1000 extremely light, took a few Kms to get used to it, but once I did it was a nice ride. Ergonomics would have to be taken care of as with all bikes.

For the weight difference between the 650 and 1000, my choice would be the 1000.

There is a difference in the suspension as well. A cruiser will generally be 3 to a max of four inches of suspension travel, reduced when you sit on it solo and two up. Air suspension on a cruiser to compensate for this is to me a must. The adventure style of bike will have 6 plus inches of suspension travel, makes a huge difference in ride quality and performance. Suspension on my DL1000 is easy to adjust between riding modes. Older cruiser suspensions are generally soft and need an upgrade/renewal.

I find the DL1000 easy to drag the foot pegs compared to my Goldwings, easy to "throw" into a corner/curve so to speak. First time this happened it surprised me, but got used to it quite quickly.

The DL1000 if kept to a sensible speed gets good fuel economy, I've seen over 50 IMPG on mine. My Goldwings are in that range as well.

Did a ride familiarization trip from Toronto to home in Victoria BC and was impressed with the ride and performance.

Was Interested in the weather envelope. Don't get wet on my Goldwings unless stopped, get some water while riding but nothing of significance. Had the opportunity on the ride across Canada to ride in substantial rains, and was impressed with the weather envelope. Kept quite dry considering no fairings like the Goldwing, give it an 8 out of 10 for this.

Doing a maintenance/work period on my DL1000. It is not easy to do maintenance and rivals my Goldwings for time to get at items. Lots packed into a very small space, gas tank, plastics. I'm certain I will get used to it and faster as time goes by.

As mentioned peruse the various forums, check out YouTube videos for reference. The VStrom was always commented on favourably by off-road riders as being not great at any one thing, but did a good job at most.

Long ramble. I'll stop now. Good luck. Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Thank you very much for the detailed report! Lots of great information. Right now regardless of what I buy I can still save at the same rate. My main concern is a comfortable bike that is reliable. Wether that is ADV or cruiser. Like I said it will be my 1st bike(after 15 years), not my last bike. Btw, what do you guys think of that idea, of buying a bike with the intention of keeping it for only 2-3 years to get back in the saddle so to speak
 

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T Btw, what do you guys think of that idea, of buying a bike with the intention of keeping it for only 2-3 years to get back in the saddle so to speak
I don't have a problem with that, it's not like this is a lifetime decision. Heck, many here upgrade to new or used bikes along that time period anyway. Buy used, play on it for a year or two, then if you want something different sell it. The used market is flooded at least around here with deals everywhere.

If you are just farting around on local rides a KLR or DR thumper is fine. But, if you have ideas about seeing some of the awesome places in North America I strongly urge you to look at a fuel injected twin or triple.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
I do want to ride on the highway, even if it’s day trips from the start so not really wanting a really light weight bike that will get tossed around on the highway.

With a short season in Alberta and shift work I’m not going to be putting on major miles either though.
 
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