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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys. I’m new to the forum and would like some help making a choice on a bike. I’ve been away from biking for about 15 years and I’m hoping to buy a bike in the spring time (I live in Alberta Canada)

I was originally thinking that I would buy a cruiser. Mainly because 15 years ago when I sold my Buell I wanted a more comfortable highway bike and at the time thought it would be a cruiser.

Now it seems that the trend is going toward adventure touring bikes and cruisers are a dying breed.

I want to be able to ride double with luggage on the highway without being a hazard but have no desire to break any speed records or add demerits to my licence.

I’m 6’ and 225lbs. My wife is 5’4” and ———every guy knows it’s illegal to ask a woman her weight! She’s much smaller than me!

Thinking about a V-Strom 1000 or 650.

Other question is chain maintenance, adjustment, and longevity. Most riding will be on highway unless I come to a gravel detour or interesting side road but certainly not sand dunes or major off road riding. How often do you clean, lubricate, check tension, adjust tension? How difficult to adjust tension? With my described riding how long could I expect a chain to last?
 

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I'd tend to buy now rather spring and also think a 1000 best given your location and use and size.
 

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Hands down take advantage of the deals right now on the Vstrom 1000 or 1000XT model

If you riding two up on the highway the 1000 will give you the extra power you need without
too much extra weight when compared to the 650.

Chain can be adjusted and lubed on the fly if you like. Proper tools required. lube every 600 miles or so.

Tons of luggage options, Windshields ,etc. The Vstrom 1000 gets great fuel economy and is priced right.

Great bikes that like to be ridden and require low maintenance.
 

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Chains last me 20,000 miles, and I don't do squat for maintenance relatively speaking. I clean the chain in the spring with kerosene to get the salt and brine residue off. Otherwise I only slather on 30W motor oil with a paint brush. Adjusting chain tension is a piece of cake. Never experienced the dreaded axle gauling. I just lubed and adjusted the chain last week for the first time in over a month, and that's the first adjustment it's needed in months. I have about 65k on the bike, and over 20k on this chain. I'll replace it in the spring, whether it needs it or not.
 

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Adventure bikes are the SUV's of the motorcycle world. If you get a bike with a chain drive a automatic chain oiler (Scott is my weapon of choice) will extend chain and sprocket life as much as 3X over regular topical periodic lubrication.

My Scott on a few ounces of ATF would easily 600-800 miles and in the 5000 miles I had it on the bike I never had to adjust the chain.

Back to the bike there is a ton of gently used stuff out there for not a lot of money. After a 15 year hiatus I'd look for something cheap to run for a year to make sure motorcycling is something you truly want to get back into. This will also let you log some miles and figure out what you do and don't like about the bike. Then use this information to find a bike that fits your wants needs and desires.

Personally I think you are on track looking at "adventure" bikes. They have a lot of great qualities. You just need to fine the make and model that suits you. Again don't get hung up on dealers offering great prices on NOS bikes trying to get inventory to move (those deals will still be there in a year). While its great if you know thats what you want if not you buy a new bike at a blowout price and then find out it or motorcycling isn't your thing and try to sell it in a year you'll really take financial bath.

I quit buying new bikes and now prefer used. Let the other guy take the financial hit because he had to be the one to put on the 1st miles. I'm over that especially when those 1st few thousand miles cost the 2 or 3 dollars per mile when it is time to sell.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Wow that’s a lot of information! I was kinda leaning toward the 1000 and there is a leftover 2018 at the dealership now that is a smoking deal.

I’d love to buy it today and get a few trips in before winter but my bank account will not allow that. Save up over winter and hopefully buy in spring.
 

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Unless you and your significant other are confident that this is not a passing fancy you may be better off considering a used bike to resume motorcycling. Other than that the V-Strom is a reliable, economical and comfortable day tripper/commuter/tourer with heaps of accessories available to customise your ride.

Don't forget to budget for good safety gear. I have a Tutoro chain oiler and an accessory sidestand foot add-on as on soft ground the sidestand can tend to dig in.
 

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Another good thing to do if is save up until you have the cash and buy outright. Loans suck and paying interest on an ever devaluating investment sucks even more.

Also remember while that 2018 is a smoking deal this year. There is a 2019 that will be a smoking deal next year. This cycle repeats itself year after year.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yes. My goal is to save up and pay cash. The 2018 is just one that I seen and mentioned as a “I wish I had the cash” kind of thing. Helmets with blue tooth, leathers jackets, boots, luggage, back rest and any other accessories needed. Also need plates and insurance the day I ride it home. Thinking that all told, depending on bike of course, would be 10,000-15000. But if I’m not there in the spring time I’ll buy a lesser bike and safety gear. Then upgrade in a few years.
 

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Another good thing to do if is save up until you have the cash and buy outright
Buying a good deal behind the market and using factory finance makes all sorts of sense. Interest rates are at historic lows...put what cash you have down or into farkles and factory finance the rest.

Your cost of finance runs about $2 a day ...you likely pay for a coffee or some other frivolity you can dispense with. Finance is a tool....there is no good reason not to move on what you want now.

Dealers are especially eager to move stock now - turn that to your advantage in some extra farkles.
 

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Single day ?? single trip ??..season?

900+ km on a single day. 10k km on a trip out west with my son was longest ...lots of weekend and 4-5 trips in the east. Solid reliable bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
That’s a lot of km. When I had my Buell I did a few 10hour+ days and decided then that the next bike would be more comfortable. I have to wrap my head around the fact that the bikes today are different from when I had mine and technology has changed. When I was buying mine chains were a thing that seemed like a lifelong headache but now it’s a much different scenario. I’m excited either way to get a bike and get cruising again.
 

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Buying a good deal behind the market and using factory finance makes all sorts of sense. Interest rates are at historic lows...put what cash you have down or into farkles and factory finance the rest.

Your cost of finance runs about $2 a day ...you likely pay for a coffee or some other frivolity you can dispense with. Finance is a tool....there is no good reason not to move on what you want now.

Dealers are especially eager to move stock now - turn that to your advantage in some extra farkles.
We certainly disagree on taking loans out and financing toys. But we all handle our finances differently and have different goals.
 

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That’s a lot of km. When I had my Buell I did a few 10hour+ days and decided then that the next bike would be more comfortable. I have to wrap my head around the fact that the bikes today are different from when I had mine and technology has changed. When I was buying mine chains were a thing that seemed like a lifelong headache but now it’s a much different scenario. I’m excited either way to get a bike and get cruising again.
The O-ring chains with very little lubing/cleaning will typically go about 20K miles as someone mentioned. If you have an oiler or lube it manually every 200 miles (which is what I do) or so it will last much longer. My chain currently has 34K miles with no signs of wear, but the front sprocket ($15) was toast at 30K miles. If you do a lot of miles gat an auto oiler or be prepared to oil a lot. If you only do 4K-5K miles a year you can be more casual.
 

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I'd say the 1000 would be your better steed, I mostly ride single so the 650 does anything and everything I ask of it fabulously.
 

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Since you are riding 2 up. I would suggest the DL1000. an automatice oiler like tuturo does prolong the life of chain and sprockets.
 
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