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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Im sure many of you have worked on minimizing your toolkit. Thats my purpose here.

I've lost the info I had on adapters and extentions to use with a couple drivers (standard 1/4 hand-held driver; and 3/8 rachet with 1/4 and 3/8 extentions) which should be able to use all the various bits (hex, standard, jis, torx).

What exactly am I seeking? Im on the Wiha tools site and kinda lost.

Thanks for helping a jr mechanic :fineprint:
John

Update- after much more online searching I finally cobbled together more tools to create what I think will make a compacter, yet quality tool assortment. Sears and the other local stores couldnt help much in the compacted and sometimes unusual tools.
 

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Sans a discrete tool recommendation, I had great success in building the smallest relevant tool kit for my Strom by starting from zero.

I laid out an empty tool roll, and proceeded to disassemble portions of the motorcycle in zones. I focused on what I'd need to remove in order to gain access to a particular part (for repair/replacement), and/or what I needed to remove the part directly. E.g., a 4mm t-handle hex wrench and a small nail set were the first additions to my tool roll, because together they serve to remove almost all of the plastic on the bike. The articulating spark plug socket was one of the few factory kit items that also found a place in my tool roll, because it worked better than any substitute that I could configure.

I also added some obviously helpful items like self-fusing silicone tape, zip ties and an axle tool (Motion Pro Hex Axle Tool - Motorcycle Superstore). I also carry a few $20s in the roll, so that gas money is always available.

The aforementioned methodology allowed me to efficiently assemble the absolute minimum tool set that I would require for road side repairs and/or road trip maintenance. It concurrently allowed me to substitute quality wrenches, etc. for the pot metal slop supplied in the factory tool kit. Those items added to the tool roll were of course taken from my garage inventory, and were replaced in short order.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for sharing ultraman! Great common sense approach to onboard toolkit.

J

Um. Whats a small "nail" kit?
 

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The small nail set is used to remove the button clips that hold the fairing together. A real small screw driver of either type will do also.
 

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The small nail set is used to remove the button clips that hold the fairing together. A real small screw driver of either type will do also.
A small allen key works as well and has other uses.

The stock kit is 'mostly O.K.' missing , spare bolts and some way to get the front wheel off, but again, Suzuki got that right, tubeless tyres so if you need to remove the front wheel you are in shit so deep already that it's not going to help.

Pete
 

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Tool Kit
1. Tire repair kit
2. Air pump
3. Air pressure gauge
4. End snips
5. Chain Lube
master link
6. Extra fuses
7. Zip ties
8. Duct tape
9. Super glue
10. Quick set JB weld
11. Multi tool
12. Needle nose pliers
13. 2 crescent wrench (5” & 8”)
14. Oil filter wrench
15. Large Allen wrench tool for font axle
16. 3/8” socket wrench, 3” extension, 8” extension, spark plug socket, 17mm, 12mm, 8mm, 9/16 sockets, 6 mm Allen wrench socket
17. Electrical tape
18. 10 and 12mm wrenches
19. 1/4” drive torque wrench and 15/16” socket 1 ¼” socket 6” extension
20. Allen wrench set (metric)
21. Multi bit screw driver
22. Flexible screwdriver
23. Precision flat head screwdriver
24. Slip ring pliers
25. Chain breaker
26. Glass wipes
27. Paper disposable funnels
28. Extra headlight bulb and turn signal bulb.
29. Lock tight
30. Ink pin & notecards
31. Extra straps and bungee cords
32. Owner’s manual

I keep the air pump under my seat as well as the extra bulbs. Everything else goes in the bag (except the tq wrench)


 

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Discussion Starter #9
I hope the jis bits are necessary. 4 bits cost me $33 shipped :(

Thanks for sharing your pics arstromer. Saw a few tools I still need to obtain.

Gotta figure how to pack the tool tube too.

Lotta work prepping for the Dec trip:fineprint:

John
 

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Add some button clips in the two sizes as well. They don't last long once they've been removed once or twice. I also carry a spare clutch and brake lever and a turn signal stalk - they are among the first things to go in any kind of tumble.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Add some button clips in the two sizes as well. They don't last long once they've been removed once or twice. I also carry a spare clutch and brake lever and a turn signal stalk - they are among the first things to go in any kind of tumble.
Experience speaks. I hadnt thought of button clips nor turn signal stalk.

Thanks
 

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I also carry spare clutch and brake levers. Need them once, use the old ones for this. The ones that the knob was broken off of in previous drops.
 

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I haven't seen any + headed screws with the JIS mark on the heads--I've seen that on other Suzuki models. Phillips screwdrivers have worked well so far. JIS is closer to Phillips than European Pozidrive to Phillips, for example.




The plastic rivets are available in many motorcycle shops for about $6 for a ten-pack.
 

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I did OK with Phillips screwdrivers on anything on my Strom that needed it. Can't really recall too many things that were held on with cross-head screws, and most of those were pretty low-torque uses (unlike when Japanese manufacturers used to put all the engine covers on with JIS screws). Still, I've often thought I should have a set.

Those plastic push-rivets wear out? Maybe if you mishandle them or something? My '02 Vee still had all its original ones when I sold it this year, and the plastics had been off and on quite a few times.
 

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I know we all have different ideas of what is essential, AR-Stromer, but you have a lot of things in there I have never needed even for doing a valve adjustment, steering head bearing adjustment, and fork seal replacement among many other things.

A torque wrench for on-the-road repairs? I think a reasonable "nice and tight" estimate will suffice until the trip is over. An oil filter removal adapter? What's wrong with the good 'ol human hand? TWO crescent wrenches? I've never needed even one to work on this bike. And that complete fold-out hex key set seems like overkill when a mere three sizes will suffice.

And curiously you have omitted the one part of the OEM tool kit that actually is useful -- the jointed plug wrench.

To each his own, of course, but my method has always been to take note of what I needed to work on the bike in the garage, and then incorporate those tools -- and those tools only -- into my travel kit. Plus a tire repair kit and air pump, of course.
 

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Years ago someone told me the best way to build a tool kit is to only use that tool kit to do any work on my bike.

I have long since past those days. But working that way in the beginning really developed my tool kit.

I've found that more often my kit and supplies are used to fix someone else's bike.

Things that I have added that I don't normally see on others list of tools they bring.
Short section of a hack saw blade, on end rounded the other square, straight and the corners sharp.
100 grit and 400 grit wet or dry sand paper.
I have also used a foam back nail file with roughly the same grades
Small file the one on the old school leather man is good.
Small section of alum can.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Years ago someone told me the best way to build a tool kit is to only use that tool kit to do any work on my bike.

I have long since past those days. But working that way in the beginning really developed my tool kit.

I've found that more often my kit and supplies are used to fix someone else's bike.

Things that I have added that I don't normally see on others list of tools they bring.
Short section of a hack saw blade, on end rounded the other square, straight and the corners sharp.
100 grit and 400 grit wet or dry sand paper.
I have also used a foam back nail file with roughly the same grades
Small file the one on the old school leather man is good.
Small section of alum can.
Ok McGuyver. What does each of these do?

Thanks all. These tips are quite helpful. I should have a tool tube installed over the next couple weeks; see what room I really have.

John
 

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I know we all have different ideas of what is essential, AR-Stromer, but you have a lot of things in there I have never needed even for doing a valve adjustment, steering head bearing adjustment, and fork seal replacement among many other things.

A torque wrench for on-the-road repairs? I think a reasonable "nice and tight" estimate will suffice until the trip is over. An oil filter removal adapter? What's wrong with the good 'ol human hand? TWO crescent wrenches? I've never needed even one to work on this bike. And that complete fold-out hex key set seems like overkill when a mere three sizes will suffice.

And curiously you have omitted the one part of the OEM tool kit that actually is useful -- the jointed plug wrench.

To each his own, of course, but my method has always been to take note of what I needed to work on the bike in the garage, and then incorporate those tools -- and those tools only -- into my travel kit. Plus a tire repair kit and air pump, of course.
oh yeah... my kit is total overkill. I don;t think it would be a good idea for other people to copy my tool kit exactly... but I think there are some good suggestions in there. My tool bag it is still pretty small so i keep it all on the bike. The tools you see on the list that you don't use are probably due to different farkles I have. The precision screwdriver is for tightening the little screws for my heated gear dials. I think I last used the crescent wrenches to tighten up the hwy pegs. I dropped the bike one time and the whole thing slid to one side and I had to readjust it (or ride home with it sticking out far on one side). What I did was every time I used a tool I took a picture of it on my phone then bought a second one for the bike when I was at Lowes (or wherever) and it became this list. I've never needed the jointed plug wrench to change plugs and I thought about the "nice and tight" but I'd have to buy different sockets because the ones that fit are 1/4". I think you're right about the hex key set.
 

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I hope the jis bits are necessary. 4 bits cost me $33 shipped :(

Thanks for sharing your pics arstromer. Saw a few tools I still need to obtain.

Gotta figure how to pack the tool tube too.

Lotta work prepping for the Dec trip:fineprint:

John
You will be much less likely to jack up the fastener heads with the JIS bits- which is good when you are away from home.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
You will be much less likely to jack up the fastener heads with the JIS bits- which is good when you are away from home.
Makes good sense to me :yesnod:

Been putting several mods on the bike using as close to possible the tools in the kit. Very good experience.

J
 
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