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Just purchased a 2007 wee without any maintenance history. While carrying out the valve adjustment I found that the rocker cover bolt was came out abnormally. Someone damaged the threads and put some kind of thread maker in the hole. I am thinking to put a helicoil in the upper cam housing. M8-1.0 fine metric thread. There seems to be a lot of side wall on the hole so it should work. The other fix is to buy a new head which seems overkill. Has anyone came across this before. Thanks
 

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Cgp, this is what I use when dealing with stripped threads, damaged thread bores, etc:
++ TIME-SERT Official Threaded inserts for stripped threads, blown out sparkplugs,

Helicoils are cheaper, but Ive seen them come out with the bolt upon disassembly.
Time-serts, when properly installed, literally become part of the head, pan, block, whatever. Ive used them in spark plug threads, aluminum oil pan drain plug threads, and aluminum engine block cylinder head bolt threads.
A Helicoil is basically a "Slinky", the time-sert is a closed solid threaded bushing. that is expanded from within at both the top and bottom of the thread bore. It wont strip out of the bore like a Helicoil can. I have both Helicoils and Time-serts, and whenever possible, I use the Time-sert.
 

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Time serts are the best out there!

But in a low load application I would not hesitate to use a Heli-coil. High strength loctite keeps them in place. Available about anywhere.
 

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"High strength loctite keeps them in place"

Not always, as Ive had helicoils come out with the bolt when Red Loctite and even Loctite Stud & Bearing mount was used. Especially if the threads were damaged and some sort of "thread maker" was put in the thread bore, which gives me a mental picture of an enlarged and damaged thread bore. NEVER a problem with Time-serts.

Then again, the Helicoil cost is attractive compared to a Time-sert. If I had to do a quick repair, and cost/time is an issue, and the owner insisted, then I MIGHT use a helicoil if I had to.
For my own vehicles I and other's motorcycles I service, I use Time-Serts only.
 

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I remember reading about someone else stripping threads on the head. May have been a cam bolt hole.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

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Well...the main problem I have seen is people working on things that either have no feel for torque, or wont own an in-lb torque wrench because they think that have a feel for torque. The net result is the same.

Outside of exhaust nuts/bolts, I usually use a 1/2" 0r 3/8" drive air-ratchet, bigger items I use an air-or electric impact wrench for disassembly. But on assembly, I always run them down with the same tools and I hand-torque everything there is a spec for. And in cases of no spec, there is always a bolt size/torque spec chart in a service manual.
It was somewhat amusing/pathetic watching alleged techs start bolts with an impact, realize they got the bolt cross-threaded, and figured..wth, and just ran the bolt in regardless. If it didnt break or strip on the way in, they were good to go. Until the next poor unfortunate- that had to take it apart--namely ME--had to deal with what they mutilated.
You do learn what torque feel like before the bolt or threaded bore gives up. But even at that...I use a torque wrench during assembly. The time used in doing so is far less than the time involved in repairing threads.
 

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ST, you'd change your tune real quick of you had to deal with 24 oil pan bolts and 28 timing cover bolts day in/day out.
I no longer have to do that since I'm now on my time, but you learn where to save time and where to take your time. It becomes a way of life.
 

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I don't do it for a living anymore. When I did it was on power-sport equipment and there was more stuff torn up with power tools than time saved.

For auto-mechanics I could see the value.
 

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ST, add to that the motorcycle owners Ive dealt with that possessed a 1/2" ratchet only, 2 extensions, and a 1/2" to 3/8" adapter, followed by a 3/8" to 1/4" adapter, and 1/2", 3/8" and 1/2" sockets. Can you say.."Stripped engine oil drain plug threads", or "stripped spark plug threads"? I sure can...and did. No power tools involved in those cases.
The best...or worst, depending on your point of view was the owner of a Honda CBR 954 and a Yamaha R6 owner that left his Yamaha countershaft sprocket loose, yet stripped out a spark plug thread on his 954. Time-sert insert took care of the spark plug threads, and a thread file cleaned up the countershaft threads.
 

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Just like anything else, when properly installed a Heli-coil stays put.

BUT, like anything else, getting owners/users to do the job correctly is a problem that leads to blaming the product maker.....

If you use thread locking products regularly you should already know about and have on hand a primer/adhesion promoter/activator made for that product.

Follow directions! You would be surprised at how many have never read directions. Some types WILL state they require a primer!

Clean the surfaces! Apply primer/activator. Allow that to flash off and dry. Put red locking compound onto Heli-coil. Install it. Within moments it is set, within a short time later it is all but permanent. There is NO way to remove the Heli-coil, no way it comes loose, without heating the area to the release point. Which is higher than this part will ever see.

When properly installed a Heli-coil into aluminum makes the repair stronger than the original threads. We used to Heli-coil bolt holes on our two-stroke engines back in the old days to keep from screwing up the aluminum in exhaust ports and other often serviced fasteners.

Yet there is a better way when you can get to the part to work on it and need higher strength. Time Serts are much bigger and spread out the load. But you really need to install them straight and that can be an issue. I used to machine a copy of them for the Super Tenere clutch baskets when I was modifying those. They were the only way I was comfortable threading into the thinner aluminum these had.
 

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Would staking the helicoil prevent the insert from backing out?
Well, I just googled it (duh) I was being lazy I guess. The above explanation is great. Unfortunately, my helicoil is set in place without thread lock, but is staked. The included instructions...did not (iirc) mention thread lock. It did mention blowing out the hole after drilling and tapping then wash out with a solvent, leaving no oils. I knocked out the tang. I'm not redoing it just to put loctite on the insert.
This is from Helicoils website, These are 2 optional steps (But manufacturer recommended)-

http://www.repairengineering.com/helicoil.html
Apply a light coating of Loctite Thread-Locker compound to the external portion of the coils of the insert prior to threading it into the housing. If this method is used, be sure not to apply too much Loctite and be sure to wipe the internal threads of the HeliCoil insert clean after it is installed so that the fastener does not bond to the insert.

Using a punch and hammer, peen the threads of the housing slightly at the (non-tang) end of the installed insert. The intent with this method is to slightly deform, or compress the housing thread to make it more difficult for the insert to accidently back-out of the housing.

I'm good to go!
My clutch slave mount problem. No wonder why it wouldn't tighten. PO tried epoxy:confused:


P.S. I figure it's not Hi jacking the thread because it add to the op's info gathering. If it is, I'll delete- Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks guys. I have always used the proper tool for every job that I have done. I am big on torque wrenches and making sure they are always certified. My aviation back ground demands it.
 

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Cgp, there is no "right" or "wrong" here in these posts.
I can only go by my own personal work experience using various types of thread repair kits and equipment through the years. I have used Heli-coils and other manufacturer's thread repair kits, I have 6 metric H-C kits and have used inserts from all of them. Not one of mine has ever come out, but I have worked on vehicles from other mechanics who did t take the time to follow the instructions or otherwise compromised the thread repair.
I have 3 Time-Sert kits--one for the Mazda engine oil drain plugs, one for 14mm spark plug threads, and one for 10mm spark plug threads as used on many motorcycles. The H-C kits you can buy at most all auto parts stores, but I prefer to purchase the Time-sert kits on an as-needed basis. Depending on the thread sizes and kits involved, you can buy 2-3 helicoil kits for the price of one Time-sert kit. I feel the Time-sert kit is the superior product.

My last dealership also handled Oldsmobile. The Aurora V8 was part of the Cadillac Northstar family. This engine was infamous for many things, but the worst was cylinder head studs pulling threads from out of the engine block. The repair kit from GM was a Time-Sert kit, removing the studs and drilling out all of the block stud threads, and replacing them with Time-sert inserts. Good enough for them, good enough for me.
 
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