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Fall is in the air... 52 deg F. while riding to work this morning. Cold enough to wear the liner in my olympia airglide jacket. Got me to thinking about hands for fall and winter riding. Wondering if there are strong opinions for heated grips vs. heated gloves. I probably won't be riding in weather below 38 deg F., but I do have about 30 mile commute at speeds of 55-65 mph. I have hand guards which help with wind chill. Would heated grips plus a thinsulate glove be sufficient in these conditions?
 

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It is generally thought that heated grips heat the palms but the backs of the hands still get cold but they are more convenient in that they are always ready to use, you can't leave them at home. Good gloves for these are thin one or two layer palms with insulated backs.

Heated gloves heat the back better but the palms tend to not have any heating and therefore can get cold. They are probably a bit warmer but the better heated grips can pump out a lot of heat so the difference might not be as much as one might think.
 

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I put grip heaters on my Concours a few years ago, nice difference on the cold mornings. A year or so later I got Gerbing gloves. BIG difference on the cold mornings. All over warmth; palms, backs of hands, fingers, ahhhhhh...

I haven't put grip heaters on my V-Strom, though I may still. There are some mornings when it's not quite cold enough to use the heated gear, but the grip heaters are perfect for taking the edge off. You can certainly install them for a lot less money than you can get decent heated gloves, and it's not a big job to do. Might just go ahead and give that a shot first to see if they will be sufficient for your needs.
 

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For me it came down to price. I think I invested a total of $50 into the heated grips. Buy the plug from Eastern Beaver and a 30 minute install and you're good. On the "high" setting the grips feel like they're burning my hands:) and and the "low" setting the grips are very comfortable. I like them because they're convenient, always on the bike, just hit the switch. I suppose the back of the hand doesn't get as warm as the rest of the hand, but I don't mind. I only care about my fingers.
 

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When using heated grips in cold weather it helps to wear the right gloves. When it's REALLY cold I use just the Gore-Tex shells from ski gloves or the like, without the fleece liners. The thin palm lets heat through, and without the liners there's enough space in there to let the heat circulate. Meanwhile the windproof outer shell keeps the cold at bay. Works for me. Leather gloves are useless in cold weather, heated grips or not.
 

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My Oxford Hot Grips work great with a set of hand guards to keep the wind off the back of my hands. Much easier than plugging in hot mitts and when you turn off the Hot Grips you are back to normal for the warmer afternoons. Saves carrying multiple sets of gloves.
 

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I've only used grip heat, but I'm planning on a set of gloves soon. One big advantage of gloves that hasn't been mentioned is they will work on any bike with a power outlet. Grips are good for just the bike they are on.
 

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I prefer heated grips because they're always on the bike. I don't need them on really cold days because I'll already be wearing insulated gloves and that's enough for me down into the low teens. My heated grips get used mainly on those in between days when it's chilly but still too warm for winter gloves.
 

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Oxford heated grips with Hippo Hands during the winter with my normal riding gloves keeps hands toasty warm into the low 30's. Take off the hippo hands as soon as weather permits and when it does get cold at night up here in the Sierra Nevada just flip on the heaters and once again hands stay toasty warm, except one time, in late spring, going over Tioga Pass a few hours later than planned, even at that it was just a chill on the back of my hands. Advantages you always have heat with you, just in case, and only need 1 pair of gloves.
 

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It makes so much more sense to have a heating element in insulated gloves than trying to heat the bottom of your hands through insulated gloves.

But the tethering to a power source sucks ass. Battery technology has progressed immensely in the last ten years, and yet I still see jack for battery powered proper motorcycle gloves.

You could easily keep a pair of batts in a charger while wearing two in the glove, and I used to fly RC on an 11 min timer w/ NiCad w/ an equiv. weight battery now flies for about 2 hrs (or more likely when your neck hurts).

Clearly, the batteries are of great enough capacity and cheap enough to be very cost effective. I just don't get why there is no market for it. :confused:
 

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52 degrees? 108 here today, I don't need no stinking heated grips, but I do have Suzuki heated grips, they work well.
 

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While I did switch out my summer gloves for this morning's and evening's ride, I started thinking about my heated issues too. I have a pair of Warm 'N Safe heated gloves, they are technically my cold and wet weather riding gloves (I wore the today, not plugged in). This past winter, I rode down to -4F for my commute. My morning run isn't so bad, the bike sits in the garage overnight and is relatively warm. The evening ride back, however, can be brutal. The heated gloves warm the back of the hands, I feel the cold grips on my palms for a while. I am considering heated grips as well. I also want a Gerbing jacket liner too, not sure if the '02 DL1000 can handle it though.

If you ride in the real cold, both might be the answer.
 

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Fall is in the air... 52 deg F. while riding to work this morning. Cold enough to wear the liner in my olympia airglide jacket. Got me to thinking about hands for fall and winter riding. Wondering if there are strong opinions for heated grips vs. heated gloves. I probably won't be riding in weather below 38 deg F., but I do have about 30 mile commute at speeds of 55-65 mph. I have hand guards which help with wind chill. Would heated grips plus a thinsulate glove be sufficient in these conditions?
I have had both set ups on another bike and I prefer heated grips. Heated gloves seem to make my hands too warm. Heated gloves are very bulky.
 

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I have heated grips and Gerbing heated gloves that connect to my Gerbing jacket liner.

In really cold weather the heated gloves are far superior to heated grips and they draw less current. However, the ones I have are bulky enough that it is hard for me to turn the knobs on the Gerbing thermostat. So I rarely use the heated gloves any more. The heated grips are adequate for my fair weather riding style and I can use them together with the heated jacket liner. I have a voltage monitor and it stays green with both of them turned on.

If I did enough cold weather riding to justify more farkling, I'd probably install a thermostat that mounts on the handlebar instead of the one I have that hangs loose across my lap.

I really do love my Gerbing heated jacket liner though! I don't leave on a trip without it.

Mike Brown
Vancouver, WA
 

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But the tethering to a power source sucks ass. :

why so? have you ever used the power cords supplied with gloves & jacket liners etc. they connect directly to your bikes battery, pigtail stays hitten nicely under the seat unless your using it, plugs are friction fit, they stay secure when you are riding, but pull apart easily if you accidently walk away without unplugging

better than replacing and recharging batteries


back on topic

I always recommend getting heated grips before you get heated gloves, gloves work better for colder temps, but grips are always on the bike even in middle of summer when you are out on a particularly nippy evening or get caught in a cold rain shower.

if you ride is frigid cold like me, get both, not one or the other



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gloves win

I've tried both and found the heated grips only warm the warm side of your hand. They were nice, but they didn't really put the heat where I needed it. The Gerbing gloves cost more, but are covered by a solid lifetime warranty, plus they go with you from bike to bike. I use mine on my Wee and my Husqvarna dual sport. The controller for your gloves will work on other heated items like socks and jacket liners without added cost. :thumbsup:
 

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hand guards

the hand guards make a big differece in cold weather , if you dont have them i recomend them first before grips or gloves
 

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I am considering heated grips as well. I also want a Gerbing jacket liner too, not sure if the '02 DL1000 can handle it though.
I ran both Oxfords and a Gerbings liner and the only ill effect I noticed was the headlights would pulse slightly with both jacket and grips on High.

The electrical gurus here can better explain how to add up the load so you can better predict if it will overload the system. The one thing I do like about the Oxford grips is the built in voltage detector that will automatically shut them down if voltage drops too low (11.5V IIRC).

Ride safe!
 
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