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Have never had any heated gear. In Georgia wanting to ride a little more this winter season (30F-40F). So what gear do you think I should most look into (or do I even need any at all). In order of value and bank for the buck or most needed. Looking to see if there is a common thought on this. Thanks
 

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My Gerbing jacket (not vest) can keep me comfy when it is in the 30s.

Have never had any heated gear. In Georgia wanting to ride a little more this winter season (30F-40F). So what gear do you think I should most look into (or do I even need any at all). In order of value and bank for the buck or most needed. Looking to see if there is a common thought on this. Thanks
 

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Heated gear makes things sooooo much more pleasant when riding in temperatures near freezing. And if there is some rain thrown in it may be a life saver.

I ride with a heated jacket liner and heated grips. I've ridden in well below freezing weather and had chilly knees and once, oddly, toes, but so long as the core stayed warm I was fine. The Tourmaster heated liner I have is too hot to run on high. The OEM heated grips are a little anemic but do the job.

If nothing else, pick up a heated vest. Keep it in your cases or near your riding gear and throw it on when the temperatures drop. A reasonable heated vest can be had for $100 - $150. You can usually wire them straight to the battery. The improvement in your riding attitude when it heats up will be miraculous.

Take a look at Tourmaster, Warm'n'Safe, Gerbings. They're all good. I bought the Tourmaster because it comes with the temperature controller. Some of the others didn't when I bought mine.
 

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most important imho is heated grips, you have them with you all the time, I probably turn my grips on more in summer on cool nights or when it is wet and rainy and I am wearing summer gloves

heated grips is the first addition to every bike I have ever owned

next would be an electric vest to keep your core warm, unless you are going to ride in more extreme cold, an electric vest is adequate vs an electric jacket liner , but for the price difference, you may want to just spring for the jacket liner

I ride in temps as cold as -25°f and have found no need for other electrics like socks or pant liner, but I do wear Sorels (boots) in winter



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Priorities

Grips first, since they're most convenient to kick on/off at will and they can take the edge off without having to change anything. As temps change throughout the day it can be a hassle to stop and change gear.

Second, jacket. I have the Tourmaster heated jacket with long heated sleeves and collar since my arms get cold. And it makes it easy to plug in my heated gloves. :) Keeping your core warm can usually keep the rest of you warm as well.

Third, gloves. I rarely use these but when I need them it's usually a showstopper if I don't have them. Having them means I can keep riding in otherwise weather that is too cold for me.
 

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For 3 months of the year heated grips over heated gloves? Seems like the gloves would be a better option?
 

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1--Core. Vest or jacket
2--Heated gloves. An alternative is chemical heat packs on the backs of your hands ( where all the blood vessels are) inside insulated gloves.

Keeping the brain warm is critical. Wool or poly fleece helmet liner or balaclava is important.

Also keep in mind that the rubber in your tires needs to be normally warm for good traction. Tires warm by flexing. Higher tire pressure flexes less. Running at the swing arm sticker pressure at most is my way.
 

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If I had heated gear, it would be gloves at the very top. I only have a short commute, but I would ride ride well into the teens and below.

After 6 miles, my hands really hurt. Everything else was fine, but I was wearing thermals under everything, three or so layers up top, wool socks with thick boots, and a scarf of some sort. Even with the most decent gloves I could afford (which isn't saying much), it became very hard to ride in the teens.
 

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When your body temperature gets dangerously low your body defends itself by concentrating available blood flow and warmth to your vital organs. That is why it is always your hands and feet feel the cold first. On that basis any assistance anywhere will give you some comfort, although personally a good jacket and heated gloves would be my first choices - or do what I did and move to Queensland.:thumbup:
 

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Heated grips first! Heated Jacket second. Gloves not needed. IMHO

Grips keep hands warm, do not need any wiring disconnected when getting on or off the bike, various heat setting near grip. Are always with the bike in case there is a change in the weather. Most used heating for myself. In rain, cold temperatures. I use thinnest glove possible to use available controls. Electric gloves are bulky.

Jacket is wired to bike with a temp controller on the bike. With the jacket sleeves being warmed, and heated grips my hands are good below 32 degrees F.
 

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For 3 months of the year heated grips over heated gloves? Seems like the gloves would be a better option?
Absolutely Yes grips before gloves. I only vote that way because of their versatility and my own personal experience. YMMV.
Seasons change and you'll be surprised how often you kick on the heated grips, even in the summer sometimes when the weather surprises you.
The gloves are bulky and inconvenient. Wonderful, but inconvenient. :yesnod: I usually hold off on the gloves until they're really needed, and then only on long trips. My insulated winter gloves get much more use.

Also, heated grips are usually 1/4 the price of heated gloves so it's easy to go for them first. If you've got the money, do both!
 

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Priorities, again...

Throwing in another 2 cents... and realize please that I'm just trying to be helpful... :)
My priorities above came from the thinking of, "what do I use most often" as opposed to "what would I really want if things were finger-numbing-holy-crap-its-cold every time I got on the bike"

So if you're thinking of how to be most comfortable in very cold temps all winter long, I could maybe be persuaded to change the order of my list. However, I would still list a heated jacket before heated gloves.
If you don't have hand guards yet, get them. Before heated gloves or grips! Keeping the wind off your hands is critical and you may never need heated gloves at all if that's taken care of.
 

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1st-heated jacket. Why? First, a jacket keeps your arms warm and they tend to be in the airstream more than your body. Keeping your core warm ( and I mean warm, not just above where shivering starts ) will make your hands and feet warmer.

2nd-might put heated grips here but if you have already put in the wiring for the heated jacket then adding the heated gloves is a simply plug in job. Yes, heated grips are great and should be standard. Heated gloves work much better than just grips and I do run both. I cycle the grips on-off or low to high to keep fingers toasty warm. Good heated gloves give more control than trying to wear heavy gloves with liners with just heated grips.

3rd-heated pant liners. These are a difference maker on long rides. I have found that for commuting and short trips of under an hour you can get away with a LOT less heat and specialized clothing. But, riding for two hours and longer really puts your system to the test and the heated pants prevent you from having a toasty upper body and cold legs/feet.

I also have heated insoles I put in for long cold rides. If you have never been caught out without the proper gear when temps drop or rain starts you are lucky. It can be dangerous!

Main reason I like heated gear is the mobility it gives. I don't have layers of clothing that block or restrict movement.
 

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I had heated grips on my 2006 and rather enjoyed them. I actually wore them out and bought another set. I did a cheap heated vest with heated arm chaps and heated leg chaps. Thsi particular brand was crap and after that I never got heated ger until a couple of years ago.

Layers of soft shell and the Aerostich Fleece pants took care of riding down to single digit F temperatures.

Two falls ago my wife got Tourmaster heated jacket and Gloves. They were inexpensive as they included the controller. After she had it for a bit I decided to try it out as well.

I loved having the heated gear!

Unfortunately mine started acting up. the clip on the controller broke, the wiring on the jacket broke, wiring on the gloves broke, and internal wire broke. I though it was just me as I am incredibly hard on everything but then my wife started having similar issues.

Tourmaster was very good (although a bit slow I think as they were moving offices in Canada) and gave the dealer we purchased from full refund taking back the glove and jackets.

I ordered Warm and Safe Jacket and controller and am extremely pleases with it. Later I got some Gerbing gloves (my hands are an odd shape so had to try them on and I don''t know of anyone in Canada stocking the Warm and Safe gear.) Too bad as they are great people to seal with!

I am very satisfied with the results!

My wife is petite so there were too many questions ordering her Warm and Safe mail order so she got Gerbing gloves and jacket as well and is extremely satisfied.

Strangely, even though I bought a set of heated grips for my 20012 shortly after buying the bike, I never put them on and haven't severely missed them. There was a couple of times that I was caught out with too light a glove and heated grips would have been nice but I am only now thinking seriously about installing them.

So my answer would be jacket then gloves, and heated grips after if you feel the need.

..Tom
 

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I had Widder and BMW vests( made by Widder). Wonderful! Had a pair of English heated gloves that were very primitive but worked, kinda.
Gerbing and others now make such good stuff that not buying it is a shame. I found the heated jacket at a rally for $150. I got some close out Widder gloves for $50.
Heated grips are nice, work best with hand protectors. Gloves aren't overkill is you travel where it gets cold.
The Gerbing heat-troller works really well too.
 

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Cold? You wanna talk cold weather and heated gear? Why are you listening to people from Texas and Arizona? You need the Canadian opinion. We know cold (with a nod to Randyo who also knows cold and snow).

For a long time the only heated gear I had was a heated vest. It's good in that keeping your core warm frees up heat that can go to your extremities. Plugs straight into the battery, no controller or switch required. When it's cold plug it in, when it's warm unplug it. Then I got some much better cold weather gear (gloves, jacket, pants). With the jacket, it's so warm and windproof I haven't used my heated vest in 2 years.

I have added heated overgrips from Oxford. The Hot Hands velcro around the grips you have, plug into the battery and have an on/off switch. Warm toasty hands when required, and removable for the summer! The switch is on/off, while most other heated grip systems have multiple settings, so if you only need a little heat, you can get that.

I've had a number of friends who have gone with heated gloves. If you get heated gloves you must get a heat controller or off switch. If not, you will rapidly find yourself with blistering burns on your hands. With the gloves, the heat elements are always in the exact same spot, which can cause the burns. With heated grips, if you notice that you are getting a hot spot on your hand you can move your hand a little to prevent a burn.

I haven't found the need for a fully heated jacket or liner, pants/chaps, socks, footbeds, or seat. If it's that cold you probably shouldn't be riding, or riding at that speed ... and I've been riding in temps down into the low 20's, with snow and freezing rain.

So should you get a vest or grips first. It depends on the rest of your gear. If it's really good at keeping you warm already, go for heated grips. If you gear is marginal in the cold already, go for the heated vest, and get some really warm gloves. Another thing that I found helpful on previous bikes was getting handlebar muffs. You find these for ATV's. They go on over the controls and block ALL wind and rain getting to your hands. The stock handguards on my '03 look great, but are useless for that. You have to get used to the idea that you can't see your hands on the controls, but you aren't supposed to be looking at your hands anyway right?
 

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Cold? You wanna talk cold weather and heated gear? Why are you listening to people from Texas and Arizona? You need the Canadian opinion. We know cold (with a nod to Randyo who also knows cold and snow).
Haa! I resemble that statement!:biggrinjester:

While I live in Houston, I am a WV native and frequently ride up north on long trips. I have ridden in 4 degree temps and in over 110 degree temps. I know what it is like to have to keep both feet down on ice to keep the bike upright......and don't want to do it anymore.

Below freezing is easy. You know you have to dress for it.

The danger zone is 40 degree rain, imo. That is the coldest I have ever been. Literally had to pry myself off the bike. The rain evaporating off you really sucks out the heat. So even us Southerners need to have good gear!

You can get Hypothermia in 60 degree weather. Don't fool yourself, if your teeth are chattering you are in danger. The cold dulls your reflexes. Buy what gear you can afford if you ride in the cold. Money well spent.
 

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...

So should you get a vest or grips first. It depends on the rest of your gear. If it's really good at keeping you warm already, go for heated grips. If you gear is marginal in the cold already, go for the heated vest, and get some really warm gloves. Another thing that I found helpful on previous bikes was getting handlebar muffs. You find these for ATV's. They go on over the controls and block ALL wind and rain getting to your hands. The stock handguards on my '03 look great, but are useless for that. You have to get used to the idea that you can't see your hands on the controls, but you aren't supposed to be looking at your hands anyway right?

I vote for heated grips + the handle bar mitts. The mitts allow wearing lighter gloves so you can actually feel the controls! I used to use the Rocky Mt. Tusk mitts they work and are cheap. I switched to the Koplin Geartector mitts. They are much nicer for not a lot more money.

You do need some sort of handguard for the mitts or they colapse on the levers at speed.
 

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Will the Koplin mitts fit over O.E. deflectors/guards?

Don't know. I had them on my KLR with Moose Racing guards.

I'm fairly new to my DL650 and just put Tusk handguards on. I know that the Koplin's will fit over those.

I'm thinking that the Tusk mitts wouldn't fit on the OEM Strom guards but the Koplins probably will.

You do have to punch a hole for the mirror stalks.
 
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