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I am considering adding speakers into my full face Shoei helmet. I have a GPS and and iPhone. The purpose of the bluetooth speakers will be to listen to music while riding and to hear the GPS directions. I do not want a microphone becuase I ride solo and also do not want to make or receive phone calls.

Is there a solution out there for me? It seems most solutions (like SENA) focus on the mic and communication ability.
 

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Hey Strombastic,
I just purchased the Cardo Scalarider QZ last week. It is a solo rider bluetooth setup. It does not have communication abilities to other riders. Only phone calls, music etc. The microphone can be removed. Also the speakers can be replaced with any type with an audio jack. Ex. Ear buds, other headphones. I put my phone in my rear tail bag. Works most of the time. It does cut out once in a while. When its in my jacket there are no issues. It comes with a helmet clamp mount and adhesive mount. The bluetooth unit detaches from the mount by a release lever. Check it out. I picked it up for $130 here in michigan. Also there is a Cardo App that makes changing settings on the unit easy.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Riders with audio equipment have three tasks involving hearing. Number one is to protect it. Wind noise harm is cumulative. Hearing damage can do more than reduce volume. It can make it more difficult to distinguish sounds among other sounds, like having a conversation in a noisy environment. My big fear though is tinnitus. I have a friend who had to go on disability because of it. Sufferers get a constant tone nothing can stop. It takes precedence over all other sounds and can make it very difficult to sleep. All riders should wear earplugs. The faster and farther you go, the more important they are.

Only number two is to hear an audio source. That is a second consideration. Something is needed to reduce ambient sound so an audio source can be heard at a less than harmful volume. Some people claim they can hear helmet speakers through earplugs. I haven't tried but the two seem to be at cross purposes.

Number three is comfort. You can't protect your hearing or hear audio if the device(s) are too uncomfortable to use.

What worked for me is custom earphones. They reduce ambient noise almost as well as foam earplugs, allow sound to be heard at normal volume and can be worn day after day, solving all criteria. Over the counter earphone that claim ambient noise reduction worked for me for a while but became uncomfortable after a few hours. When touring, my ear would start bleeding on the second day.

This is what I used.
Got Ears?® Brand Challenger Custom Molded Isolation Earphones (FREE Impression Kit + FREE Shipping Included!) - Perfect-Fit™ CMCP Model Custom Motorcycle Ear Plugs (FREE Impression Kit + FREE Shipping Included!) (One Pair)
 

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I have the Uclear system, it has a microphone but no boom.

The microphone is built into the ear piece so you could use it for communication if required at a later date but you don't have the boom or mic getting in the way.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Riders with audio equipment have three tasks involving hearing. Number one is to protect it. Wind noise harm is cumulative. Hearing damage can do more than reduce volume. It can make it more difficult to distinguish sounds among other sounds, like having a conversation in a noisy environment. My big fear though is tinnitus. I have a friend who had to go on disability because of it. Sufferers get a constant tone nothing can stop. It takes precedence over all other sounds and can make it very difficult to sleep. All riders should wear earplugs. The faster and farther you go, the more important they are.

Number three is comfort. You can't protect your hearing or hear audio if the device(s) are too uncomfortable to use.

What worked for me is custom earphones. They reduce ambient noise almost as well as foam earplugs, allow sound to be heard at normal volume and can be worn day after day, solving all criteria. Over the counter earphone that claim ambient noise reduction worked for me for a while but became uncomfortable after a few hours. When touring, my ear would start bleeding on the second day.

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So how do you tell what is acceptable sound levels? I have a shoei Rf-1200. The helmet itself seems to do a major job of keeping sound down. When I occasionally flip the visor while riding, the volume goes up substantially. It almost seems quiet when riding with the helmet on. So is that enough protection? What about the risk of not hearing things (like cars coming around corners) when wearing earplugs? I am finding it hard to figure out a balance. And frankly I am unsure about getting speakers for music at all in case the music impairs my safety.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Whether to listen to music is a personal choice. Some people are calmed by it while others are distracted by it. If you can remember the last three songs you heard, you are probably paying too much attention to the music. I wouldn't trust a helmet to do a good enough job of keeping ambient noise down. Some helmet and fairing combinations might do okay for less than highway speeds or short exposures. Earplugs help a rider hear traffic noise by lowering wind noise. Try different combinations to see what works for you. If you aren't sure. opt for lower total volume.
 

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My setup is very basic - an iPod Shuffle clipped to the front of my vest and Sennheiser in-ear speaker buds.

The Sennheiser buds do a great job of cutting down the wind-roar whilst still allowing me to hear everything that I should be hearing. Without the buds, the wind-roar drives me mental! I've also found these slightly more upmarket buds to be very comfortable on extended trips.

Typically, I only turn on the music whilst out on the open road.
 

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Uclear uses a boomless mic which is mounted in the speakers. The sound quality is good but unfortunately they don't fit will in the RF1200. I had to modify the inside to make them fit. Recently I made the switch to the Sena SMH10 unit and couldn't be happier. Like stated before, the mic is a wired or boom set up. I installed the wired mic and Velcro it to the chin bar right next to the front of the cheekpad. You can't tell its there. They are easy to use and are glove friendly.
 

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Those on a budget may find the Sena SMH5-FM is an attractive option. I can hear my Zumo 550 with my Macks ear plugs in place very clearly and that's with my tinnitus. Numerous places on the internet have the single unit at $119.25 w/free shipping. In addition, it can pair up to 3 other riders and has a half mile range. It's also very small and inconspicous.

Here's a link to the Sena website: SMH5-FM - Sena
 
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