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After riding through a nasty storm, my headlights went out. Neither the brights nor the regulars work. The bulbs are completely fine along with the fuses, but they keep going on and off. It's 100% something with the wiring or the switch. Not sure what I need to do. Should I buy a wiring kit? What kind? Is there a way to fix the system now? Is it worth it? Will the fix last?
 

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After riding through a nasty storm, my headlights went out. Neither the brights nor the regulars work. The bulbs are completely fine along with the fuses, but they keep going on and off. It's 100% something with the wiring or the switch. Not sure what I need to do. Should I buy a wiring kit? What kind? Is there a way to fix the system now? Is it worth it? Will the fix last?
Did you check all the connectors?
there are two hidden grounding blocks.
I had to deox all my connections including grounding blocks and used liberal amounts of silicon grease.
Use a voltmeter and track down the problem spot, start at the fuse box, then the switch and headlight connectors.
 

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The two connectors that were the culprit in my case were the two connectors that connect the handlebar switches to the main wiring loom. These two connectors live just ahead and below the airbox, requiring removal of the airbox, tank, front fairings and crash bars...

There are wiring kits available (eg. from Eastern Beaver) but these will not fix your current problem, as they still use the existing wiring as signal power for the relays. So if the current wiring is dodgy, you'll need to fix that first. These kits do limit the current that goes through the current wiring and connectors, and will prevent problems in the future. They also deliver more volts to your bulbs, so brighter lights.
 

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@ SlandersPete, your profile doen't show the year of your Vee. There are different wiring diagrams for the Vee models, thus without knowing the year it makes things difficult. Have you had a look at Headlight problems?, for a poll on headlight failure. This should serve as a guide of the most likely causes.
 

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The plugs that connect the handlebar stuff to the main wiring loom are not weather-sealed, so I guess this is what can happen in sufficiently nasty weather. Seems likely that water ran down the wires and got in the plugs, making stuff not work.

You might also have some oxidation/dirt/who knows what in there making the connection poor.

IMO you don't really have to take apart half the bike (tank, air box, fairings etc.) to get at the handlebar wiring plugs. I found it sufficient to undo the 2 large bolts that fix the bottom of the radiator in place, and loosen the fairing on at least one side. That lets you push the radiator and heat shield juuuust a little out of the way, so you can get at the plugs reaching in from the side.

Then you can get in with tools and/or fingers to undo the necessary connections for inspection/cleaning etc. Or at least, I was able to do so.

One side of each connection (can't remember which) has a springy nub that snaps into a hole in the big piece of plastic that sits behind the radiator.

As for how to keep this from happening again? You could try wrapping all the connections in quality electrical tape, like 3M Super 88. It may eventually dry out and fall off, but should keep water out for a while.

I wish Suzuki had used weatherproof connectors here. They probably assumed that the relatively enclosed location would keep water out for the most part.
 

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The most likely culprit is that ^%$#@! furshlugginer stupid asinine idiotic unsealed undersized connector in the left fairing "cheek".

This happens to 100% of V-Stroms sooner or later. Basically, they run the headlight wires carrying about 10A of current through undersized wires and connectors. Inevitably water gets in, corrosion starts, the connections get hot, and... darkness descends.

I firmly believe there's an electrical design engineer at Suzuki who's been there since the '60s making the same stupid mistakes over and over again, and the guy really needs to retire. Maybe he has already if we're lucky.


Anyway, if you're lucky, the connector isn't yet too warped by corrosion and heat and you'll be able to get it apart, clean the connections, and put it back together with some dielectric grease. The real fix is to remove the three connections for the headlights (ground, low, high) and bypass that connector, using nice correctly sized and weatherproofed individual spade connectors, or a sealed connector. The other connections in that block are fairly low current, so cleaning and protecting them should suffice.

If you're not lucky, the plastic shell might be burned and warped, so you'll need to break it apart and replace it with a proper connector, or at least replace the shell.

If you're stuck in a parking lot or something, unplugging and re--plugging that connector if possible, or just wiggling vigorously should scrape enough corrosion off to get home.
 

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you're not wrong. That multi-pin connector does have a drip shield/boot, but IMO Suzi should have sacked up and used a fully-weatherproof, automotive-style connector.

They do use such connectors elsewhere on the bike, e.g. both primary TPS and secondary TPS plugs. They really shoulda used one on the connector that pretty much hooks up all the forward electronics!
 

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Fully agree with bwringers rant. I have made it standard practice that whenever I have the bike apart and I see a connector, I plug and unplug it a number of times to get rid of any corrosion on the contacts, and then pack it with dielectric grease (silicon grease) If I have not done so before.
 
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