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Knowing the exact model would help. My Gen2 DL1000 has been an absolute bastard. First bike I've owned where high beam is physically below low beam and the only way to set the thing up is either annoy the neighbors or set up a target about 40' away.
 

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Dakor82m

Let's back up a little bit.

Is your bike loaded so that that even with the shock spring preload knob set to full preload, that your headlight will shine too high? (I assume this is the case?) If that is the situation, you might want to approach the headlight adjustment from a different way- install a stiffer shock spring to lift the rear of the bike. What is the loaded lbs on your bike (rider, passenger, cargo)?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It's a 2014 1000 assumed since I posted in the 14-16 thread this would be assumed and all headlights on this generation are the same as far as aesthetics go.

Beam does point high, preload maxed out, but I ride solo and while I am big, weigh 270, didn't think that would be out of stock range.

I have thought about getting a raising link. I'm only 6.1, but I have tall seat and would not mind slightly sharper steering from raising the back end.
 

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There are four adjusters, two for low beam, two for high, left side sitting in front of the bike 10mm long reach socket in hand is up down, right side left right - leave left right ALONE.

Low beam I THINK you have to remove the top of the console but that's likely O.K. or close to.

High beam, find somewhere flat with a wall about 40' away. Get a tape measure, measure the height of the high beam filament either with the bike on the center stand or wing it holding it up and sitting on it (Yeah, center stand wins). Walk to your target, put a mark there. Back to the bike, wait for dark, lights on, adjust high beam so that the top of the bright patch is roughly on your marker. If you ride at 200kph at night, center the bright spot on the marker. For me that puts high beam hitting the road surface about 100m down the road and doesn't light up roadside signs to blinding, If I'm riding at night I'm not riding stupid fast. The faster you ride at night the nearer to flat that needs to be.
 

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Dakor82,

At 270 lbs, you are out of the load capacity of the stock spring. You probably are not feeling bottoming out, but you're riding low in the stroke where the linkage ratio increases, plus the bottoming bumper is saving you from the abrupt bottoming clack which we all remember from some bike in our past.

I think you'll be happy with the change to a stiffer rate spring. Here is what you'll gain with the stiffer rate spring:
1. You'll be riding "in the middle of the stroke" of the suspension, rather than towards the bottom of the stroke. The higher riding height will have more suspension travel available to absorb bumps.
2. The stiffer rate spring will support the rear of the bike better on bigger "G out" type bumps, meaning that you won't consume as much travel on the bigger G-outs.
2. Your steering geometry will be much better with the rear of the bike riding higher. Parking lot speed steering will be much better.
3. And, your headlight will shine correctly.
 

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I am assuming that since you posted in the 2014-2016 DL1000 forums that is the bike you have. If you have a different model/year let us know.


I want to point my beam down a bit can anyone provide a cheat sheet?
Did you get it figured out or still need some help with this?

I don't find taking off the instrument cluster a big deal but yes it would be easier to do if you could do without like I could on my 2 DL650's. Once you get it off you will see the two adjusters on each side of each headlight. The uppermost beam is the low beam and the 8mm nut with the Phillips Screwdriver "socket" in the middle is the adjuster. I forget which way it turns to go up and down.

I have original springs and shocks, currently weight around 230 but have weighed as much as 260 with this bike. Sometimes the bike is loaded up a lot and I haven't really had any issues making the headlight be adjusted properly. Maybe we all should go out and upgrade the springs and/or shocks but you might find you get along fine without doing so (I have for over 120,000 miles. Maybe I don't know what I'm missing but it sure rides and handles nicer than my 2006 DL650 DL650 did with it's upgraded rear spring and shock and firmer springs and cartridge emulators in the front.)

..Tom
 

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Thanks for the link Gert. I joined that forum and as regards the headlight adjustment If you read down the list of comments you will get to the real answer. You don't need to remove anything. A number 2 phillips screwdriver will do it.

One of the best things about the stacked headlights is that the high and low beams can be adjusted independently. You can have the low beam set to be kind to oncoming traffic and have the high beam set for maximum vision.
 

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My understanding for headlight adjustment is find a wall & measure 25 feet from wall to head light. Measure height to center for each light. Mark the wall 2 inches below the height for each light. Adjust each light to it’s respective mark.
 

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It should be noted that if you installed an LED light, it most likely will not be adjustable since they send out a flood type beam, not a spot.

I had installed LED on my bike and had to remove it because it was blinding drivers at night. I taped over the lense for a bit, but that was stupid.
 

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I have zDatt on mine, both high and low beam and they are spot, not flood. No blinding other drivers at night after properly adjusting the hight of low beam (and yes, low beam needed adjustment downwards, a lot). High beam didn't need adjusting.
 

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I have zDatt on mine, both high and low beam and they are spot, not flood. No blinding other drivers at night after properly adjusting the hight of low beam (and yes, low beam needed adjustment downwards, a lot). High beam didn't need adjusting.
I think it is worth underling the fact that our headlights can be adjusted independently. Really a great feature!

I do a lot of "sport" riding before and after daylight hours. I take my lights seriously and use serious lights. I'm also courteous to other drivers. Besides, it is in my own self interest not to blind a driver I'm sharing a narrow road with.

I adjust my low beam at night by parking my car up ahead of the bike at about the distance I would maintain when following a car. I simply keep the core beam just below the trunk-lid. The high beam I adjust against highway reflective side-markers. I have found a highway rest area near me where I can park the bike inside the rest area and have a straight shot looking down the flat highway. (it wasn't that hard to find) As I raise the high beam adjustment, there comes a point when the farthest reflector dims. That is the point where the light has pooped out. Or the point where my eyes poop out. Either way that is the best I can get. I'm now ending the 3rd season on these lights so I consider it a fairly low effort to get what I want.
 
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