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I’m not all that mechanical to be honest, so please take it easy on me as I know I’m making this job harder than it needs to be.

Broke my shift lever and just got the replacement part in yesterday, but can’t seems to figure out how to get the old one off. It’s not a traditional nut like my dirt bikes I’ve replaced, so am having trouble. I don’t want to ruin this seal but am not sure how to get it off without tearing it to pieces. Could somebody tell me how stupid I am and how this seal comes off so I can put the new lever on?

Thanks in advance and I apologize for my stupid question. Pic attached below.
 

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Looks to me like its held on with a snap ring. It's that little horseshoe shaped clip with the two holes at each end. If you have snap ring pliers you spread the ring apart and slip it over the end of the shaft. It can be removed without snap ring pliers but you run the risk if it being flung across the room and getting lost.
 

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From the part diagram, https://www.mrcycles.com/oemparts/a/suz/508afe11f87002353072307b/gear-shifting, you can have a clearer view of how the gear shift parts are assembled / fitted together.
A sir-clip / snap ring pliers makes life so much easier in working with the clip. Just remember when using the pilers, open the clip wide enough to slide it off the perch. Do not use excessive force when opening the clip or you could easily deform it so that it will not clamp again. Press the gearshift lever in towards the bike, to give a bit of clearance.
 

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What you really need is a pair of snap ring pliers. Fine screwdrivers and needle nose pliers might work, but as gdrew says, it may end up being flung anywhere. The snap ring sits in a groove in the shifter shaft, preventing the lever from sliding off.
 

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And remember that snap ring is the same color as asphalt. If you drop it on pavement you will need a rolling magnet to find it.

These instructions may help. They show how to remove the gear shift and all those cautions above about not overstretching the ring are right on the money.

https://www.adventuretech.biz/gear-shift-relocation-instructions.html
 

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Start collecting tools.

I would start by reviewing the links others have provided to determine if you think this is a job you feel confident in taking on. It really is straightforward, and you shouldn't have any insurmountable problems. Next, A trip to your local hardware store, big box home improvement auto or tool section, or an auto parts store for a pair of snap ring pliers (also called circlip or retaining ring) similar to the ones that @Brockie pictured. Amazon has them starting around $8US & up. Removal and re-installing the clips is so much easier with the right tool. You may eventually want to dive into wheel and steering stem bearings and they also commonly have this type of retainer.

Today snap-ring pliers. Tomorrow...
 

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I would start by reviewing the links others have provided to determine if you think this is a job you feel confident in taking on. It really is straightforward, and you shouldn't have any insurmountable problems. Next, A trip to your local hardware store, big box home improvement auto or tool section, or an auto parts store for a pair of snap ring pliers (also called circlip or retaining ring) similar to the ones that @Brockie pictured. Amazon has them starting around $8US & up. Removal and re-installing the clips is so much easier with the right tool. You may eventually want to dive into wheel and steering stem bearings and they also commonly have this type of retainer.

Today snap-ring pliers. Tomorrow...
...
I see no problem with this
 

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Damn Motorpsychology,

You got me beat. I don't have that tall one on the end.
I don't have any of it, actually, found it on the Information Superhighway
Truth in embellishment::grin2:
 

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Buy a couple of spare external circlips and slather the area with silicone adhesive after you've done the job. I've removed that to lube it several times now and it's VERY hard to not damage the original circlip.

Sorry, I can't remember the size, I just brought a kit of ebay and have a around nine of the right size on hand as a result.
 

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One thing about snap ring pliers - the points need to be hard enough to not bend when you use them. I've had a couple of them just fold in the middle of use - broken and now the pliers are useless. I went out and bought name brand tools - they cost more (than a Harbor Fright* cheapie) but can last a lifetime unless you are a pro and use them daily. There are inside snap ring pliers and outside pliers - the diff is the way the points move when you squeeze the handles. Some are even combo units, you move one handle on the pivot to make them move the opposite way. I even picked up one with a screw mechanism and interchangeable points. You spend your money, you makes your choice.

*Not all HF tools are garbage, but their quality can be variable. Experience will teach you which ones last and which ones do not.
 

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I have never been a fan of combo tools - like those multi headed screwdriver sets. They are never as easy to use as an individual tool.
I have just two snap ring/circlip pliers. One is a straight outer clip and the other a right angle for an inside clip. They have done everything I have ever needed.
 

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I have never been a fan of combo tools - like those multi headed screwdriver sets. They are never as easy to use as an individual tool.
I have just two snap ring/circlip pliers. One is a straight outer clip and the other a right angle for an inside clip. They have done everything I have ever needed.
I'm a confessed tool nut. My tool collection is well used and built up over many years. Yes, I do own more tools than I need, however, many years ago I rebuilt all of my auto's brake cylinders and I did all of our mechanical maintenance on our cars and bikes for about 30 years. (I finally saw the light when I realized that a task that had taken me several days with parts snafu's would have taken my professional garage friend only a few hours - and that I could have been earning money with my van had I paid him in the first place.

I agree w/ your comment re combo tools, but mine are Snap-On and perform well. I own maybe half a dozen different snap ring pliers because over the years I have found the smaller sizes tend to bend or break if you use them on the much larger snap rings. Internal, external, straight, right angle, there is a bewildering array of configurations. Buy what you need for the job at hand, and next time, buy a bigger tool if needed. That's what I've always done.
 
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