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Has anyone tried them or have an opinion about them?
Have not tried them, but I don't think of them as being something I'd use on the bike since I already have a power source there. Elsewhere, maybe, but not at that price.
 

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Even though there is power on the bike, I like the idea of "wireless" hand heat. If it heats well enough on a lower setting (to get the hours up), it's worth a look just to eliminate the wire mess.

$199 is not bad considering most wired gloves are in the $150 range.

Hopefully we have some early adopters out there who can give us a review.
 

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Gerbing makes quality stuff but claims are from the marketing department

Caveat Emptor

High have a complete with sleeves Gerbing Jacket liner. I have been comfortable down into the 20's with it heating the blood that goes everywhere.
 

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I've owned a pair of Gerbing S2 gloves for close to a year now, and I love them.

Just to be clear I did not buy them primarily for riding. I suffer from Raynaud's Syndrome which causes the circulation in my fingers to stop completely if they get too cold. Not only is this unpleasant but if you're not careful it can lead to frostbite. One of the features of Raynaud's is that once the circulation shuts down no amount of insulation can restore it - you have to heat the fingers externally to get the circulation going again. The S2 gloves do that for me.

I bought them in December last year, so the first test was snow-blowing the driveway. Hanging on to those hard handles would freeze my hands every time even with snowmobile mitts on. The S2's at medium heat however made the job comfortable for the first time in many years.

Once I had them I of course had to try them out on the bike. They're not intended for riding but they work very well, within their limitations, and I use them a lot now in colder weather.

Some observations:

1. The maximum output is 7W, while a 12 volt Gerbing motorcycle glove packs 21W.

2. Gerbing's claims for battery life are reasonably accurate. I've never run them down to zero charge, but 2 hours at high heat and 8 hours at low seems pretty close. Most times I have them set at level 2 or level 3 (there are 4 heat settings) so they're good for half a day. Great for commuting, but not very good for serious touring.

3. I have hand guards on the Wee, so the gloves don't get very much direct wind. Even so once below 40F you need the high heat setting to stay warm, and at about 36F they won't keep up. This doesn't matter much to me because you won't find me riding below 40F anyway.

4. Heat distribution is excellent, both front and back, but I find I get less heat to my index fingers than I do everywhere else. No idea why.

They're not a true replacement for heated motorcycle gloves but the fact that you can use them anywhere with no wires attached makes them worth it, at least to me and my frozen fingers. :mrgreen:
 

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It will unload the low-powered electrical system a bit...besides, it you don"t like them they have an excellent resale value...
 

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Battery powered may be nice but it's really pleasant to have the controller adjust the hand temps when riding in the cold. I have a couple pair of Widder gloves and when it gets really nasty they are real pleasure.
You can always get and Easter Beaver headlight switch and not worry about the draw of power to the gloves.
It really helps to have the heated grips and a decent set of hand guards too.
Cold Sucks.
 
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