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Discussion Starter #1
curious if anyone has done a suspension how to.

I'm looking for

1. front fork springs (looks like they can come right out the top?)
2. rear shock replacement
 

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curious if anyone has done a suspension how to.

I'm looking for

1. front fork springs (looks like they can come right out the top?)
2. rear shock replacement
Generic fork spring replacement on damper rod forks:

SonicSprings.com

Let me know if you have any questions.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Could you not just remove the springs from the top? leave the wheels and everything else in place and just carefully take them out and then put the new ones in? you'd lose a bit of oil but i'm sure you could just add some back in?
 

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Could you not just remove the springs from the top? leave the wheels and everything else in place and just carefully take them out and then put the new ones in? you'd lose a bit of oil but i'm sure you could just add some back in?
Yes, you can. Pays to change the oil, but a hand transfer pump will get most of it from the top if you push the front of the bike all the way down.

Get some 29mm OD PVC pipe, you'll almost certainly need new spacers as well. Hacksaw to length, sand to remove all the loose bits of plastic.

The only 'trick' loosen the top fork clamp bolts as they make it hard to remove and replace the fork caps.

Ricor Intiminators and new oil are the easy fix for damping issues as well.

Pete
 

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Could you not just remove the springs from the top? leave the wheels and everything else in place and just carefully take them out and then put the new ones in? you'd lose a bit of oil but i'm sure you could just add some back in?
In theory, yes, but in practice it doesn't work too well.

You have to have all the weight off the front end in either case. If you pop a cap off with the weight on the suspension then the other leg has to support all the weight and the compresses further. That means it will be close to impossible to get the fork cap back on.

You need to change the fork oil. What's in there is thin and has a lot of wear metals in it. You could suck most of it out though the top, but what you'll leave is the nastiest, gunkiest bit.

It's easier to set the fork oil level with the tubes off the bike.

Pulling the forks off can seem a little intimidating, but it's actually very easy.

Even on older bikes that have fork oil drains I pull the tubes because it's faster, easier and less messy.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Rich, I might as well just do it right! Do you recommend replacing fork seals, bushings, etc while it's all apart? As far as i know it's all original and bike has about 35k miles
 

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Thanks Rich, I might as well just do it right! Do you recommend replacing fork seals, bushings, etc while it's all apart? As far as i know it's all original and bike has about 35k miles
At that mileage it wouldn't hurt, but probably isn't essential. The annoying part is you can't tell about the bushings until you pull it apart, and at that point you might as well change them. :)
 

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A tip with the 1" plastic pipe for the spacer is to cut small V-grooves into the upper end to clear the cotter pin in the cap.

The fork bushings ride against the aluminum inner surface of the lower fork tube. The oil is always gray and gunky with bits of aluminum wear material in it. Not enough wear to be a problem, but enough stuff to make the oil really dirty.

The shock is just a tedious job to get out, especially on a bike with the ABS unit. The remote preload adjuster unit has to slide past the ABS unit, and it seems like a magic act. It can be done, but it can get tedious loosening and wiggling until it's out. With the bike on the centerstand and a floor jack or something else to hold the weight of the end of the swingarm, take the dog bones out and the rest of the parts holding the shock. I've seen the upper clevis that holds the top of the shock really tight--took a wiggle and a pry bar to get it out. The shafts in the linkages need to be inspected and wiped clean, and make sure the needle bearings for these shafts are in good condition and adequately greased.
 

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I just did the front end on my '09 650 , with Ricor springs and intiminators from Blair at SVracing . At 70,000 km , the forks had probably never been apart , so the splooge that came out was ...:jawdrop:

The installation went quite well ,there's a lot of good info on this site .

I also changed the steering head bearings , brake lines , clutch cable , and dis-assembled and lubed the rear suspension . I had the shock out , ready to replace , but decided to hold off . It was quite a bitch to remove and re-install - the top bracket was so tight that I needed a big crowbar to ease it out .

Haines has a manual on this bike now , it was a great help .

Good luck ! Alex .
 

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BlackLab has a good writeup on his web site - I used that.

For front fork rehab

BlackLab has a good write-up on his web site for his DL650 - I used that - it was very helpful

try a search

I also posted some notes and photos a while back
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I just did the front end on my '09 650 , with Ricor springs and intiminators from Blair at SVracing . At 70,000 km , the forks had probably never been apart , so the splooge that came out was ...:jawdrop:

The installation went quite well ,there's a lot of good info on this site .

I also changed the steering head bearings , brake lines , clutch cable , and dis-assembled and lubed the rear suspension . I had the shock out , ready to replace , but decided to hold off . It was quite a bitch to remove and re-install - the top bracket was so tight that I needed a big crowbar to ease it out .

Haines has a manual on this bike now , it was a great help .

Good luck ! Alex .
Thanks Alex, I am likely going to tackle the shock this weekend. My new house has a shop, so nice to be able to work on the bike over the winter!

I'm going to order the front springs shortly, just trying to decide on what approach I want to take on it. I'm likely going to do it right and order seals, bearings, damper, springs, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
well I wound up half assing the forks. I just popped the caps off, took the stock springs out and cut them off with a dremel. I also had 300ml of left over fork oil from a buddies bike so I sucked 150ml of oil out of each tube and put some new stuff in. All said it cost 0 dollars and took about an hour. I made the spacers out of an old bicycle air pump, it was the perfect size!

The shock was extremely easy. My bike didn't have ABS. It was less then half an hour to change the shock. You dont need to remove the rear tire or the side panels. You just need a couple extensions for the socket. Nothing to it, one of the easiest installs i've ever done. The air filter, plugs, etc are all much more work.
 

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Once you done the front forks a fee times, total disassembly and reassembly takes only 1.5 to 2 hours including extra time to carefully realign the forks to ensure equal height, no twisting and smooth operation. You only need to every 10,000km even if you are OCD.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
eveyr 10,000km? my forks had never been apart and they have almost 60k on them and all I did was pop the caps off and cut them.

I got everything dialed in last night, Sag is perfect front and rear. Can't wait for spring to test it all out :)
 

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I'm looking for a how to as well, I found the one blacklab did, it's very good but for a 650, I have a 1000. I have to replace the fork seals on one side figured I may as well do both. I do have the service manual and see section 6-14 for forks.
What I am looking for is tips and tricks to get around the requirement of specialized tools and to make the job easier.
 
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