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Discussion Starter #1
I have an 2011 560 VStrom, i ride with a few BMW owners. like the GS, RT's ect, i normally ride the back of the bunch, when we get into some big turns ect, seems like they can corner sharper than the Wee, is this normal

Chet
PS my suspension is stock with the front forks raised in the triple clamps approx 5/16"
 

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I'd consider myself an average rider, nothing great, but I think the Wee handles pretty well. I am not exactly sure what you are asking about big turns. The Wee seems pretty flickable. The original owner of my Wee said he could keep up with most any sport rider (Ducatis excepted, according to him) on the Dragon where he worked for a summer.
 

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Well it is a 560 that you own, so that must be the issue. ;) Nah the bike is more than capable of spanking or keeping up with many far more expensive machines, must be something about the rider in this case. :mrgreen:
 

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I'm new to vstroms and love the way they handle. Coming from cruisers, this thing is like a sport bike to me.

That said, I think keeping up to a group is way over rated, regardless of what they ride or what you do. Ride your own pace, have fun and don't worry about being at the back of the pack - I sure never have.
 

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My personal experience is the BWW is very forgiving and it is easier to hit a corner with confidence on one than on my wee

If you spened too much time watching them corner you will find yourself out of position and find cornering hader, spend more time on your own position and you won't fall too far behind.

Have a play with your tyre pressures, you could gain some extra speed through the corners, I added 3psi to the front and it helped me heaps.
 

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Cornering

I have a C14, and a Vee. I can actually ride the Vee faster in the twisties. Your Wee should be able to keep up. Here are a few thoughts.
1. Are your tire pressures correct? Minor detail, but this is a big factor in handling.
2. Tire condition and type? Are your tires worn, pitted or squared off?
3. How is your technique? Are you comfortable with counter steering and swerving?
4. Ride your bike, not theirs. You have to pay attention to riding at your level, not the group.

Ride safe...:thumbup:
Dave
 

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Good Advice

I have a C14, and a Vee. I can actually ride the Vee faster in the twisties. Your Wee should be able to keep up. Here are a few thoughts.
1. Are your tire pressures correct? Minor detail, but this is a big factor in handling.
2. Tire condition and type? Are your tires worn, pitted or squared off?
3. How is your technique? Are you comfortable with counter steering and swerving?
4. Ride your bike, not theirs. You have to pay attention to riding at your level, not the group.

Ride safe...:thumbup:
Dave
+ 1 All great advice from sycamoredave.
 

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Handeling

I like your comparison of the Vstrom to a classical composer's work - the music coming from my wee's orchestra at @ 7000 rpm is stirring for the soul .

Don't be tempted to ride beyond your abilities , but watch your fellow riders as they set up for a corner for clues , especially watch for downshifts . Don't be afraid to wring that motor out - she sings ! ( perhaps more like Wagner than Handel , though . ):thumbup:
 

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With the right tires you can drag the pegs on the Wee and sometimes even with the wrong tires. If you're not dragging pegs then you are not at the full potential of the Wee. If you are dragging pegs and they are not then the bike's ground clearance when cornering is what's limiting you in which case you could hang off to gain a little more if you are skilled to do so. The GS and RT have more power so if you can't keep up it might be because they are accelerating harder out of the corners. I caught up with a GS an RT and a K BMW on a twisty mountain road in West Virginia, Rt. 33 to be exact. I was puttering along smelling the roses when they blew by me. I just couldn't resist so I decided to run with them. They weren't scraping hardware but they were riding pretty aggressive. I kept up in the corners fine with a worn out Trailwing on the front and a new Battlewing on the rear. In the straights they could power away because of their engine size even though they didn't but the corners evened the playing field. I have Pilot Roads on the bike now. BRING IT ON!!! :thumbup:
 

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That said, I think keeping up to a group is way over rated, regardless of what they ride or what you do. Ride your own pace, have fun and don't worry about being at the back of the pack - I sure never have.
+++++ if you want to scrape pegs, keep up, pass others, push the limits, find a track. I or one or more of my friends might be coming around that curve you are about to blow it on.
 

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before this thread turn into a pissing contest, i would agree that, if you havent scrap your pegs in the dry where u can see right thru the corner- you are the limit not the bike.

Sometimes the limitation is due to the bike havent been set up comfortably for you and the suspension is making you feel unsafe - you could adjust that to some extent.

Sometimes better practice and familiarity with the bike can bring out the confidence in you as do proper technique - Twisted of Throttle 2 is a good read and the video helps.

But most importantly ride to your own ride and dont try to chase someone down. There will always be people who ride better than you whichever bike they are on, as there will always be some who rides worse even if they are on the latest Ducati.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well that was quite a list to read for such s short time. thanks for all the replies, i agree with most on that i probably need more time in the saddle and i do, compared to the group i ride with on occasions, and with only 7k miles on the bike i will wear the stock tires out and look into a better tire.

Chet
 

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Well that was quite a list to read for such s short time. thanks for all the replies, i agree with most on that i probably need more time in the saddle and i do, compared to the group i ride with on occasions, and with only 7k miles on the bike i will wear the stock tires out and look into a better tire.

Chet
Better tires will inspire confidence. Plus, try shifting your weight to the inside a little.
 

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Like others have said, unless you are riding a low-slung cruiser which drags so much stuff that you are leaving a lurid trail of sparks at every curve the limiting factor is the rider, not the bike and not the tires.

Personally I don't think it's a good idea for a relative novice to ride with more experienced "friends." Trying to keep up with faster riders can put you into situations you are not ready for.

Group riding at any time, IMHO, is more demanding that soloing because every other rider around you becomes a potential hazard to stay aware of.

(Excuse the dangling participles in the last two sentences. This is something up with which a good editor would not put.:mrgreen: )
 

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I have a C14, and a Vee. I can actually ride the Vee faster in the twisties. Your Wee should be able to keep up. Here are a few thoughts.
1. Are your tire pressures correct? Minor detail, but this is a big factor in handling.
2. Tire condition and type? Are your tires worn, pitted or squared off?
3. How is your technique? Are you comfortable with counter steering and swerving?
4. Ride your bike, not theirs. You have to pay attention to riding at your level, not the group.

Ride safe...:thumbup:
Dave
This is very good advice. One more, go out on your own and practice without having a group to try to keep up with. I've been that route before, and it can be very frustrating. Push the envelope a tiny bit each time until you are comfortable at that level, the repeat, etc. You will find both your skill level and confidence increasing as you do this. Just remember, don't push things too far--go in tiny steps. You don't want things to get out of hand.
 

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A "better" bike or a "better" equipped bike does not compensate for lack of experience or training.

I see way too many struggling riders spending money upgrading motors, tires and suspension when training would be a much better investment
 
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