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is it not possible to inflate a motorcycle tire with one of those tiny bike hand pumps that take up very little room?

Not to hijack the original thread I’m starting a new discussion. I recently purchased a hand pump as a backup for my Slime compressor that tends to overheat after extended use. This weekend my buddy needed to air up his front tire on his Chinese bike with spoked wheels. Not wanting to unload my gear to access the compressor under the seat I grabbed the pump from my tool tube. I was surprised how easily he got from 14psi to 25psi. Later we both aired down for some dirt riding. I happily grabbed my hand pump only to find it wouldn’t work on the cast wheels on my 650. The valve stem was too close to the spoke so I couldn’t attach the pump. I plan to get a short section of hose with an adapter to put on the valve stem in order to connect the hand pump.
 

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I have a similar one on my road bike... bicycle that is. Topeak Road Morph I think is the model. I run 80-110 psi depending on the road and it'll get up there with no problem. If you get a bicycle specific pump like that, just make sure it'll fit our Schrader valves. Topeak's will do both, but some brands will only fit presta valves.
 

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If you find one that works, in the interest of science, try hand-pumping a tire from flat to see how long it takes and report back here.
 

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Yes. It is also possible to make all your own clothes from spinning cotton, but its much more prudent to buy them already made. If you have a slow leak say even with a plug installed, it may take you a week to get somewhere to get it fixed. Another scenario, you have a flat on a busy interstate. Inflating quickly may save your life. Buying an electric pump IMHO is the way to go.
 

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If you find one that works, in the interest of science, try hand-pumping a tire from flat to see how long it takes and report back here.
I would agree, it would be nice to know if pumping up a motorcycle tire in a reasonable amount of time is doable with a quality built bike tire hand pump. When I say reasonable amount of time I'm thinking in the 10 minute range. If a mini hand pump works I'll be putting one on my 650 as part of its permanent complement of tools.
 

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A friend had a double action hand pump for his motorcycle needs. It seemed to work fine when I used it but that was on a tube type tire. Not sure it would have any affect of a just mounted tubeless tire.
 

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yeah I think once the bead of a tubeless is broken you need a burst of air to seat the tube. creative use of a strap may help. also there is the starter fluid explosion trick.

 

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I have a couple lezyne pumps for my bicycles and they are the cat's meow! You would be there for a few hours trying to pump up a motorcycle tire though!
 

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I carry CO2 cartridges and a tire adapter. You get roughly 5 psi per cartridge. 4 or 5 will get you up and running, 6-8 for a full charge.
 

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I've found the compact airpumps out there are pretty small. If you're really hard up for space you can even remove them from their cases and have somethign even smaller. Most of the chinese electric air pumps all use the same guts with a different case. Rip the guts out and use what you need. Once you've got enough CO2 cartridges to deal with possible multiple flats you're about the same size and usually larger than a decent compact electric pump. I don't get tired or run out of co2 that way. As long as I have a charged battery I've got air.
 

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I use a Slime pump and take a mini-hand pump with me on road trips. A hand pump will always work, does not take hours and beats the dead electric pump every time.
 

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I keep a Topeak Mini Morph under the seat for emergencies. My previous bike was a KLR and I used it a few times on that bike. It's not as convenient as a powered compressor, but it will do the job. It's reliable, small, and cheap.
 
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