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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm old to the site, but new to the Wee (2011). I'd like to know if locals in my area get together to talk about and work on bikes. I think I could change the oil, but I'm new to most things mechanical and I'd like to learn. Anyone?
 

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Hi Rayzer. I'm from Toronto, but ride with a scooter group from Hamilton (last bike was a Burgman 400), so I'm in the area a bit. And I do most of the wrenching on my Strom. What's the problem with the oil change?
 

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Lots of new techniques.

I have been riding motorcycles, mostly in Ontario, for fifty years,
and doing most of the maintenance on over a dozen motorcycles,
but my Wee-Strom required me to learn lots of new techniques.

Merely changing the oil requires the mechanic to get lots of things right.
I needed a special wrench to grip and turn the filter, and I didn't get the
right one the first time. Some say a "crush washer" is needed on the bolt
for the drain hole, but I manage fine without one, as I always have.

The little plastic rivets are easy to break, until someone shows you how they go.

Tilting the tank, or removing it, can be very tricky, and it helps a lot
to have an experienced Stromtrooper show you the processes.

If you do not have a centre-stand, you can prop up the back end of the
right swing-arm to clean or lubricate the chain, and you can even do this
without help, but probably not until someone shows you how.

The first time you take off the black panel under the headlights, you may
wonder if you will get it back on without breaking it or having stuff left over.

I think all this gimmickry is provided to keep us from buying any other bike.
For sure, I do not want to go through all this training again, but in a few
years, I will be looking at a new Wee-Strom.

All in all, it's a very rewarding bike to own.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Rayzer. I'm from Toronto, but ride with a scooter group from Hamilton (last bike was a Burgman 400), so I'm in the area a bit. And I do most of the wrenching on my Strom. What's the problem with the oil change?
Nothing wrong so far as I know. The bike is still in the crate. I guess what I'm saying is that I imagine that I will be able to change the oil. It's the more complicated things I'd like to learn -- from oil changes and on. I've read about maintenance sessions in other areas and it's in those kinds of settings I hope to learn.
 

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But even a bullet proof bike needs maintenance.
Rayzer, You're not going to need much more than oil changes for a while. I did an oil change, no filter, at 500km, just to get the early crud out of the engine, and then took it to the dealer for it's 1000km change. After that, I've maintained it. It's got 22,000km on it now and all it's needed has been three oil changes, two oil filter changes and an air filter. Most of the work I've done on it (saving loads of money) has been the farkling. Most of that was electrical. (headlight relays, better horns, LED auxiliary lighting, voltmeter, USB power port, heated grips, and a Powerlet outlet for heated clothing/air compressor)
The mechanical stuff was easy, a set of Givi racks and a peg lowering kit. I also have engine guards, and the only challenge with them was getting the OEM bolts out. It's a pretty straight forward bike.:hurray:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
But even a bullet proof bike needs maintenance.
Rayzer, You're not going to need much more than oil changes for a while. I did an oil change, no filter, at 500km, just to get the early crud out of the engine, and then took it to the dealer for it's 1000km change. After that, I've maintained it. It's got 22,000km on it now and all it's needed has been three oil changes, two oil filter changes and an air filter. Most of the work I've done on it (saving loads of money) has been the farkling. Most of that was electrical. (headlight relays, better horns, LED auxiliary lighting, voltmeter, USB power port, heated grips, and a Powerlet outlet for heated clothing/air compressor)
The mechanical stuff was easy, a set of Givi racks and a peg lowering kit. I also have engine guards, and the only challenge with them was getting the OEM bolts out. It's a pretty straight forward bike.:hurray:
Thanks for that. I look forward to getting to know local riders.

Delivery Wednesday! I'm praying for the snow to pass us.
 
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