StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just received my Zumo 450. Before I go down and start tearing things apart, I was curious as to where I could safely route the power cable back to the battery. Does the tank have to be lifted to expose the existing wiring, or can it be accessed through one of the side covers? Thanks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,516 Posts
Well...

...it depends on what you've got going on...
Do you have any other electrical added at the 'dash'?
You could always grab power from the heated grips plug, even if you're using it. That GPS can't draw much juice...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,557 Posts
I have a TomTom Rider2 and wired back to the battery junction plate I made under the seat. I have it mounted on the left handlebar, and ran the wires down and under the tank. There was no need to remove the tank. I taped the wires to a straightened out coat hanger to fish it under the tank. A few tie-straps and Bob's ur Uncle.

Dont worry about draw on the battery. I left my Rider on for almost 3 days and the bike started no problem.

Cheers!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,516 Posts
The bad thing about the heated grip connector for a power supply is that it will allow all electrical noise to be transmitted thru the Zumo. Quite a bit of electrical interference when using ear buds while listening to mp3's via the Zumo. A filter can be installed inline but I've found it better in the long run to just use a fuse block and use a filter for it. That way all power coming out of the fuse block is filtered. YMMV
Don't have any experience with anything that makes music attached to the motorbike, only the lovely sound of that V-twin...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
I've been going over this over problem in my mind lately. I'm thinking that the easy thing to do is use a couple of scotch locks and tie into horn lead for my heated grips so I can have a switched power supply. The other option I was considering is a little more work but still pretty simple. I bought a 12 volt cigarette lighter type connector at Canadian Tire that has the 12 volt connector at one end and two wires at the other end with an inline fuse. I was thinking about simply connecting this directly to the battery and having the inline fuse makes me feel comfortable about doing so. But I still really like the idea of the switched power supply at the horn lead from my heated grips connector.

I really don't need a fuse block because I have no plans for any more power accessories.

Suggestions?


SS
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,406 Posts
....I really don't need a fuse block because I have no plans for any more power accessories...
Famous last words.

Get the fuse block....you'll end up with more goodies eventually. Getting the fuse block from day #1 means you won't have to go back and figure out the spaghetti later on.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
719 Posts
Kosik,

Does your Zumo disc have the Mac logo on it? I want a 450 too but don't want an old stock unit w/o the Mac version software - it's only been out about a month. I wonder how long I'll have to wait.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,367 Posts
... I bought a 12 volt cigarette lighter type connector at Canadian Tire that has the 12 volt connector at one end and two wires at the other end with an inline fuse. I was thinking about simply connecting this directly to the battery and having the inline fuse makes me feel comfortable about doing so. But I still really like the idea of the switched power supply at the horn lead from my heated grips connector.

I really don't need a fuse block because I have no plans for any more power accessories.

Suggestions?


SS
Regardless of whether you do a switched fuse block or not, I think it is a good idea to do the cigarette lighter thing anyway.

My GPS (A Garmin 60Cx) is plugged into the cigarette lighter. Having it not switched means that you don't have to worry about re-starting the GPS every time you turn off the bike and GPS units draw very little current so it will take quite a while to drain a battery anyway. It is not hard to remember to switch off the GPS when you are done with it.

It then gives you other benefits: you can use the plug to plug in an air pump when you want to adjust tire pressure. I have a battery maintainer that plugs into the lighter. I have a little digital voltmeter that plugs in there as well when I want to check voltages.

..Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,218 Posts
Power points other than the heated grip harness

There are three - There's a white connector with a black cap on it in the same area as the heated grip connector. There's one behind the fairing - somewhere in the front left area - might be with all the headlight wires - can't quite remember, but I found it when I had the fairing off to install the grips. There is one somewhere behind the battery compartment. A wiring diagram will show the three power leads as unconnected wires. They are switched and fused.

I figure Suzuki designed them into the bike knowing what we owners would be adding to it. When I finally get around to wiring in my GPS rather than running it on batteries I'll use one of these powerpoints. Why add more wires and fuses?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
Regardless of whether you do a switched fuse block or not, I think it is a good idea to do the cigarette lighter thing anyway.

My GPS (A Garmin 60Cx) is plugged into the cigarette lighter. Having it not switched means that you don't have to worry about re-starting the GPS every time you turn off the bike and GPS units draw very little current so it will take quite a while to drain a battery anyway. It is not hard to remember to switch off the GPS when you are done with it.

It then gives you other benefits: you can use the plug to plug in an air pump when you want to adjust tire pressure. I have a battery maintainer that plugs into the lighter. I have a little digital voltmeter that plugs in there as well when I want to check voltages.

..Tom
Thanks for the advice.


SS
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
504 Posts
Yep, Scotchlocks suck. PosiTaps rock.

I NEED an unswitched power on my GPS, Garmin Legend C. Sure it will run on batteries but I have to push the button to continue on batteries every time when shutting the bike off, this gets old quickly. Plus I like to run at full backlighting all the time, if it goes to batteries the backlight goes off and I have to turn it back on when restarting the bike. That also gets old really quickly.

However, I wired mine back to the battery it's always on and on full backlighting. This GPS got left on one time for 2 days, no problem with starting. GPS batteries were still working too :)

I almost always check the GPS after I stop the bike to take a photo etc so I want that full backlighting and I want the GPS on when I stop the bike, to check roads ahead, where I've been, or just look at the neat squiggly lines of the road ahead etc.

Trust me no matter what GPS you get you'll want it always on too. When you park the bike, you simply remove the GPS and take it with you, whether to a restaurant or at home.

For my GPS I use a Powerlet adaptor with MiniUSB plug and voltage converter for 5 Volts. I have that plugged into a Powerbar Plus on my handlebars which puts the GPS right where I want it. The Powerbar plus has a threaded hole which I put a Ram ball on and use a Ram arm to a Ram cradle for Etrex Color.

http://easternbeaver.com/Main/Elec__Products/Powerlet/Powerbars/Powerbar_Plus/powerbar_plus.html

The whole unit stuff in a small bag in my tankbag, plus the GPS easily unclips from the cradle to go in my pocket for a hike. Two aa batteries last about 24 straight hours no backlighting.

Until someone brings out a better GPS for me, I'll stay with my Legend C.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
OK then. Scotchlocks are out and directly wired to the battery is in.

Thanks!


SS
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
315 Posts
There was no need to remove the tank. I taped the wires to a straightened out coat hanger to fish it under the tank.
I am going through this right now. I am having trouble seeing a clear space for feeding the wire under the tank. I was curious if anyone else had issues feeding wire under the tank. Maybe I am just not looking close enough for an opening.

Thanks,
Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
Photobucket" media="(max-width: 640px)"> Photobucket" media="(max-width: 960px)"> Photobucket" media="(max-width: 1920px)">
Photobucket" media="(max-width: 640px)"> Photobucket" media="(max-width: 960px)"> Photobucket" media="(max-width: 1920px)">
Photobucket" media="(max-width: 640px)"> Photobucket" media="(max-width: 960px)"> Photobucket" media="(max-width: 1920px)">
[/IMG][/IMG]
Photobucket" media="(max-width: 640px)"> Photobucket" media="(max-width: 960px)"> Photobucket" media="(max-width: 1920px)">
Photobucket" media="(max-width: 640px)"> Photobucket" media="(max-width: 960px)"> Photobucket" media="(max-width: 1920px)">
I just finished installing a Powerlet, Datel voltmeter, 12v. socket (on a Rick Hughes aux shelf) and my newly aquired Zumo 550 to a Fuzeblocks FZ-1.

I used a braided wiring loom from the local auto parts store to pull all the wires through, like a conduit. By trial and error I was able to locate the loom along the left subframe and under the tank out along the wiring harness that goes to the fairing. I pre cut and labeled the 3 pairs of wires and soldered the appropriate connectors to each. I then taped the wires and Zumo cable together and fed them through the braided loom. I attached them to the FZ-1 and used Velcro to attach the Fuzeblock in the storage tray.

Hope this helps.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,402 Posts
Taking the fairings and tank off is pretty easy actually. If you plan on doing any of your own maintenance it is a must to learn.
Having said that, you can route wiring without moving the tank but you can get a much cleaner install with it off. The suggestion about using auto electrical loom is a very good one. The last thing you want is a wire rubbing on the frame etc.
While you have the tank off it is a good time to instal a fuse block, clean the air filter and generally clean up things.
Check with Jim at Eastern Beaver to get the parts needed to do the job done right. MTCW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
Audio wiring

Using a fuse block of some sort is the best way to go, but I differ with a lot of folks on running a lot of wires up front, (i run 1 circuit for audio a 12 ga wire from the fuse bolck to a terminal block up front. Then use that terminal block for all the audio devices I need to power at the front of the bike i.e. radar detector, gps, autocom, mix it, etc. You will be sorry if you leave the gps plugged in overnight on a trip and the next morning find out that your bike will not start or leave it on for a week and the batttery is dead.

use some type of relay providing switched power to your audio devices. If you need help call me at 918-446-2245 and I will talk you through it. Kieth
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top