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Discussion Starter #1
Picking up my 650 on Saturday. Can't wait to get it on the road. Going to follow the break in procedure the MotoMan recommends at
http://www.mototuneusa.com
Just don't rat me out to Suzuki. 8)
Can't wait to get away from carburetors. Going to keep my GS500. Love that bike. Carburetors and all.
 

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Break-in

I went to that interesting website. What's the "recommended" break-in period?
 
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I raised this break in method with a few people I know. To the last one they said DON'T !.

All felt it might inprove short term peformance for a race bike but was asking for trouble if you wanted longevity.

I thought my mechanic's advise was best:

No lugging, no steady RPM, otherwise run it up and down through the RPM range for a few hundred miles.

Change the oil and filter, ride normally

Bobb
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This is straight from MotoMan's website:
The honed crosshatch pattern in the cylinder bore acts like a file to allow the rings to wear. The rings quickly wear down the "peaks" of this roughness, regardless of how hard the engine is run. There's a very small window of opportunity to get the rings to seal really well ... the first 20 miles !!
Realistically, you won't be able to do full throttle runs even in 2nd gear on most bikes without exceeding 65 mph / 104 kph. The best method is to alternate between short bursts of hard acceleration and deceleration. You don't have to go over 65 mph / 104 kph to properly load the rings.have to go over 65 mph / 104 kph to properly load the rings.


You don't have to go nuts for any extended period of time it's a quick process. I did this with all my bikes in the past and my cars.
This was being done by some way before there was MotoMan. Many of us just did not know why it worked but it works.
 

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Break-in

Sorry, I don't buy the ride it hard, break-in. I have followed the manufacturer's break-in on my last three bikes and each of the bikes has been GREAT warranty-wise (as in no issues) and reliablity-wise!
 
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:shock: Hard acceleration / deacceleration in the first 20 miles! Ouch. I'm the other extreme, ride my bikes/cars gently for the first 1000 miles gradually increasing the revs but avoiding heavy loading or over revving. Always had good performance / fuel economy (not always at the same time though :) Remember having this conversation with a mechanic who serviced cop bikes (CX500's). A cop was telling him he broke in his bike gently and found the CX good for a comfortable 100+. Other cops who didn't run them in had trouble getting to 95 ... Might depend on how many miles you keep the bike for ?

Hello to everyone, first posting and first bike in the US. My 650 is 8 days old and I really wish this snow would go away so I can continue running it in :(
 

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must have been a slow trip from port of entry to your dealer.....picked mine up before i left for daytona. lessee, that was about feb 23rd....
but lets not be picky....enjoy!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I usually keep mine until they fall apart. I’m looking forward on putting some mileage. I have a 2002 GS500 and in the first year I put on 9,000 miles. I would have had 11,000 but an idiot ran me off the road and it was being repaired for a few weeks. I’m picking it up tomorrow. Had a problem with the insurance. Ryder insurance of NJ is classifying the 650 on the same level as the 1000. They want $768 for full coverage. Allstate wants I think it’s $385. I couldn’t get the policy through Allstate in time so had to go with Ryder. I’ll drop them in a few weeks and re-insure with Allstate.
 

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Back On Topic

Speaking as an ASE certified Master tech,

I have to actually agree with MotoMan. I have put 3 different engines in my 92 Jeep wrangler (rebuilt the stock one, hydro-locked that one (doh), a full long block rebuild to OE specs, and a high performance bored/stroked camed etc.) the first one I broke in according to the OE guidelines and I found an inordinate amount of oil leakage past the rings for 1500 miles (ouch). The next 2 rebuilds/replacements I broke in on a dyno in a similar manor to MotoMan's guidelines and I have to admit that even though it sounds unbelievable, the internal conditions of these two engines were MUCH better then the one I broke in "properly". When I pick up my 650 I will be doing something much like MotoMans plan.

Just my $0.02

Mike
 

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break in

Mike183

You might want to check with Ryder ins. first before you change. I was with Univiersial ins when I bought my Strom back in Apr. 2002, they wanted over 1400.00 for a year. I had only been with them for about a month or two, and I switched to State Farm for 275./year. Universial hit me for over $400 when I cancelled early.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Good point I will. There is nothing in the policy about this but I will check.
 
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"Hello to everyone, first posting and first bike in the US"

Whoops, meant to say my first bike in US. Sorry about that.

I'd be interested in any info on NJ insurance as well. I went with my dealers recommendation (Ryder) and coughed up the 700 odd. I've been without a bike for 3 years so I figured the money I saved then could pay for this year ... :wink:
 
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Back in my car racing days, the theory on engine break-in was as follows:

1. Use a fairly wide throttle opening frequently, but keep the rpm's at a moderate level. The wide throttle opening loads the rings, helping them to break in quickly. (An important aspect for a racing car, since you can't drive around on the street all day, but less important for a street cycle.)

2. Frequently let off the gas fully. The very high internal vacuum that is generated with a closed throttle sucks a little oil up past the rings, helping to lubricate the cylinder walls during break-in.

This process worked fine for the racing engines, and, in fact, is recommended for airplane engines, too, accordingly to a race mechanic friend who got his training as a aircraft mechanic. For street cars and cycles, I'd follow the manufacturer recommendations.
 
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