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Well, I get to try it all out today- the shoe, it seems, is on the other foot for the insurance guy.

A driver turned left in front of me on Hastings Street at Kaslo. The 'Strom stove in their front fender and parked there like it was in a bike rack. I don't know the extent of the damage yet - hopefully it isn't much.

God damn f---ing god damn inattentive god damn biatch. F---.

"Geez, I'm sorry... I... I just didn't see you..."
 

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Friends of mine back in Vancouver ask me "It must be nuts driving/riding in Los Angeles." I tell them I prefer riding/driving in L.A. over driving in Vancouver. Drivers here are predictably crazy. Drivers in Vancouver are UNpredictably crazy. Glad you didn't get hurt, hope your ride doesn't need much fixing.
 

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Ouch, hope there is no residual muscle aches after the rush wears off. I replaced a set of bent fork tubes on a salvage Wee. It's about $400 from the Italian suppliers.
Hopefully the cagers INS will cover everything as did the company that covered the cagers that ran me off the road.
 

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Well, I get to try it all out today- the shoe, it seems, is on the other foot for the insurance guy.

A driver turned left in front of me on Hastings Street at Kaslo. The 'Strom stove in their front fender and parked there like it was in a bike rack. I don't know the extent of the damage yet - hopefully it isn't much.

God damn f---ing god damn inattentive god damn biatch. F---.

"Geez, I'm sorry... I... I just didn't see you..."
Did you know your cousins in Oz have an acronym for that?

SMIDSY

Sorry Mate, I Didn't See You
 

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I ended up riding into a ditch on a Yamaha 175 Enduro to avoid getting hit decades ago when a middle aged woman left turned into me at a T intersection. I chased her down on the bike and screamed at her for about fifteen minutes (I was a grad student in college). I thought she was going to heave heart attack in front of me and she was still shaking when I left. I felt better. I always wondered if her awareness level improved?
 

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Front-end damage adds up quickly. Forks and wheels are not cheap.

I made a claim years ago and the insurance company (Intact) added up the cost to replace every single piece that was damaged, even the fork that had a very, very tiny blemish. I took the cash payout instead and still have the same very slightly damaged pieces on the bike. I was actually very pleasantly surprised with the outcome.

Make sure the insurance company catches everything even slightly damaged by the crash. You may find it all adds up to more than the bike is worth. In that case, you will have a decision to make - take the cash, buy the bike back (ends up with rebuild status), or go buy yourself a new ride.

Glad to hear you're okay.
 

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Well, I get to try it all out today- the shoe, it seems, is on the other foot for the insurance guy.

A driver turned left in front of me on Hastings Street at Kaslo. The 'Strom stove in their front fender and parked there like it was in a bike rack. I don't know the extent of the damage yet - hopefully it isn't much.

God damn f---ing god damn inattentive god damn biatch. F---.

"Geez, I'm sorry... I... I just didn't see you..."
My number one biggest fear!

My old commute had 2 areas where the opposing traffic had a left turn lane in a 55mph zone.... AND I HATED GOING PAST THEM. Neither had a good escape route. If someone had turned in front of me, I'd been a hood ornament.

Glad to hear you are still able to bitch about it.
 

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Well, I get to try it all out today- the shoe, it seems, is on the other foot for the insurance guy.

A driver turned left in front of me on Hastings Street at Kaslo. The 'Strom stove in their front fender and parked there like it was in a bike rack. I don't know the extent of the damage yet - hopefully it isn't much.

God damn f---ing god damn inattentive god damn biatch. F---.

"Geez, I'm sorry... I... I just didn't see you..."


What did you do to be proactive in the situation?

Not dogging you but there are things the rider can do to prevent most of these type accidents.
Share your approach let this be a learning opportunity for everyone.
 

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Happens to me so often, I made a video collage of some of my encounters (on different bikes)...
I still vid every ride, but stopped clipping out the left-turning asshats... just didn't have the ambition any longer...

https://youtu.be/0C9yW59pzRI
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Did you know your cousins in Oz have an acronym for that?

SMIDSY

Sorry Mate, I Didn't See You
Yup, I almost typed that in due to the great video (thanks @V-Tom) from the UK.

What did you do to be proactive in the situation?

Not dogging you but there are things the rider can do to prevent most of these type accidents.
Share your approach let this be a learning opportunity for everyone.
Oh, I agree! No "dogging" taken, and let's be honest, I've had my licence for one year. Before you say anything about that, you need to understand that BC, and most of Canada, has a graduated licencing program for motorcycles as well as cars, and you don't just do a slow-speed parking lot MSF course to get your endorsement here, including a full road test.

That said, the thing I did was travel in a high occupancy lane on a 6 lane busy road, meaning I was in the curb lane. I slowed a bit, to about 40km/h, as I approached the intersection as the two lanes of traffic to my left were full for a block. The intersection was clear as the two lanes on the other side were also blocked for the next red light down the road. Apparently the two drivers to my left waved the car through, both pickups. There were two dismounted pedestrican cyclists, I saw them, saw the stopped traffic, but she started to go as I approached the intersection - I did not see her move, and did not see her until she was starting to cross my path. I was to the right side of my lane, and hit my brakes when I saw her - which was just before I crossed the white stop line (behind the pedestrian line). I tried to stop, abs worked hard, screaming banshee horn did too, but hit her right front fender as she was straightening out of her turn. I couldn't have mounted the curb if I wanted to, as the cyclists were there. One of them said I "had the reflexes of a cat" as she was turning quickly and they saw me start to slow almost the same time she was turning, according to them. I was busy hauling on the brakes, and I know I fixated for the last half second on looking ahead - mostly to try to keep the bike up, i think.

I wish I could have thought of something else to do, aside from being stuck in traffic rather than using the HOV lane.
 

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I've found lighting helps a lot to reduce inattentive drivers see me better. I have two LED spot lights mounted up front that I use mostly during the daylight hours. I've found the LED light wavelength (a bluer white) really helps the bike get seen. The more yellow halogens get ignored now that practically every car has daytime running lights, I think. I suspect it causes people to not see our stock headlights as much.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
 

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I've found lighting helps a lot to reduce inattentive drivers see me better. I have two LED spot lights mounted up front that I use mostly during the daylight hours.
...
Be careful how they are aimed... bright lights in driver's eyes can act as camouflage and/or reduce the ability of others to see your distance, speed and what kind of vehicle you have. Without know these they simply may not be aware there is a thread of a collision.

Having the running lights laid out so a triangle is formed with the headlights can be helpful but make sure the main lights are not on high beam and that the low beam is pointed properly as well and as I mentioned above that the running lights are not overly bright in the driver's eyes.

..Tom
 

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What did you do to be proactive in the situation?

Not dogging you but there are things the rider can do to prevent most of these type accidents.
Share your approach let this be a learning opportunity for everyone.
I'm not sure I would agree with the "most" part of this. IMHO, this is one situation that we have the least amount of control over. Doing what you can to give yourself the most reaction time and keep an eye on them so you can react as soon as you see them start to move is about all you can do. Just knowing that the potential is there is a good start.

If anyone has any other tactics, I'm all ears.
 

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I'm not sure I would agree with the "most" part of this. IMHO, this is one situation that we have the least amount of control over. Doing what you can to give yourself the most reaction time and keep an eye on them so you can react as soon as you see them start to move is about all you can do. Just knowing that the potential is there is a good start.

If anyone has any other tactics, I'm all ears.

The first thing is to recognize that this is the most dangerous situation for a rider.


The SMIDSY mentioned earlier is prudent for the approach to the intersection.

Conspicuity measures, i.e. Hi-Viz, additional lighting, etc.

Slowing especially towards the end of the light cycle when left turners are more likely to dart across.

Lane position so that you're more visible to on coming traffic.

Don't tailgate.

Try to use a car as a shield through the intersection.

Watching for telltale signs that the left turner is about to go, i.e. wheels start turning, head moves, etc.

Cover your levers to reduce your reaction time if needed.

Have practiced panic stops and swerving from the speeds you normally ride at.


Uh... anything else guys?


Yea we don't have control over other peoples driving but we can be more proactive especially in higher risk situations.
 

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I'm not sure I would agree with the "most" part of this. IMHO, this is one situation that we have the least amount of control over. Doing what you can to give yourself the most reaction time and keep an eye on them so you can react as soon as you see them start to move is about all you can do. Just knowing that the potential is there is a good start.

If anyone has any other tactics, I'm all ears.
One of the SMIDSY tactics is to be aware of where motion camouflage can make it harder for cars to realize you are there. Essentially if you are looking at them and they are not moving in relation to the background behind them then you are also not moving in relation to your background. The result is that you can fall into the background and not be perceived as a threat. Being aware of when motion camouflage is a factor and taking appropriate action (the WEAVE being very helpful) can help in a lot of SMIDSY situations.

..Tom
 

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Good to hear you came out OK. I had a similar incident a couple of years ago when a car popped out of traffic right in front of me. Totaled the bike (hey, it was ten years old) and walked away with little more than a bruise or two.

Listen to them about SMIDSY - it helps.
 
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