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I am having a problem removing the engine bolts to install my Givi Engine Guard. Is there an easy way to remove them.
 

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I busted two tools getting one of the bolts out of mine, a 6mm hand key and a cheap (harbor freight) 3/8 inch socket. Going to sears for the 6mm socket worked, was really in there though. One thing someone recommended was a whack with a rubber mallet on the socket to "break" it loose. All the bolts on my wife's 650 came out easy, but I was beginning to wonder if I'd get them out of mine.
 

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+1 on the having to go to sears because your inferior tool broke. While installing my givi bars, my wal-mart el cheapo stanley tools took a massive chinese dump on me. The quality of metal that the rachet connects to on the stanley socket is similar to a dehydrated wiffle bat. I had to ride to sears w/ right side only givi bars on, courtesy of chinese quality. Say what you will about sears; they [email protected] times too, but stanley totally blows in comparison. Buyer beware.
 

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On the rare occasion that a Craftsman hand tool wears or fails, just take it back for a free replacement... for life.
 

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What you should start worying about is putting the new (Givi) bolts in...

Search around and you will see that many of us had issues with this. My suggestion is to at least clean the holes very well and use a wire brush or something to clean the threads of original Givi bolts as they are powdercoated (yes - including threads).

Very hard to get in there unless you do that! This includes a little flat headed screw that attches a small triangular plate on. A crimp on one of mine failed because of this (I cleaned it with wire brush but apparently not enough).

http://www.stromtrooper.com/showthread.php?t=33561

Take your time, vey easy to cross-thread.
 

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This was a niffty tool I got at Sears.
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00941111000P
it is a set of bits and a large holder, you can get a good bit of power behind it.
It is also small enough to be put under the seat.
and strong enough to put a cheater on it.
if all else fails i get out the allen sockets and my 24" breaker bar.
 

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I have installed these on two bikes now and can give the following advice.

I used the Allan key from under the seat, yes the OEM tool. I then used the handle of my trolley jack as extra leverage and applied gentle but firm pressure with NO hammers or sudden jerks. This allowed me to crack the seal of the thread lock used in the factory. I never had any problems with this. As soon as you apply shock or sudden pressure, that is when things break.

Once the bolts were out, I then used a TAP to clean the thread of the old thread lock. This made it easier to install the Givi bolts.

I would not be using anything like hammers and impact wrenches, but that is just my opinion and I have no need of them for this type of job.

Cheers
TS
 

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I will be doing this soon as I ordered. I have a Hex head socket set and the 18 breaker bar that should to the trick. Steady and firm pressure all the way. I find that i don't have to break out the impact for much on the motorcycles. I also don't need much more than a 1/4 inch drive wrench.

Thanks for the tips about the cleaning out the threads with a tap and taking off the powder coat on the bolts. I will be doing that. I'm anticipating that things will go easy.
 

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I have installed these on two bikes now and can give the following advice.

I used the Allan key from under the seat, yes the OEM tool. I then used the handle of my trolley jack as extra leverage and applied gentle but firm pressure with NO hammers or sudden jerks. This allowed me to crack the seal of the thread lock used in the factory. I never had any problems with this. As soon as you apply shock or sudden pressure, that is when things break.

Once the bolts were out, I then used a TAP to clean the thread of the old thread lock. This made it easier to install the Givi bolts.

I would not be using anything like hammers and impact wrenches, but that is just my opinion and I have no need of them for this type of job.

Cheers
TS

The "gentle but firm pressure" method didn't work well for me, as I stripped one of the OEM bolts and this was using a brand-new Craftsman 6mm hex socket.
After stripping that bolt I used a hammer on the wrench handle with a sharp rap and the remaining bolts came out easily.
I believe that The "sharp rap' method helps to break loose the thread sealant and allows easier bolt removal....Just how I did it.......

I do agree with using a tap to clean out the thread holes.
 

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I have installed these on two bikes now and can give the following advice.

I used the Allan key from under the seat, yes the OEM tool. I then used the handle of my trolley jack as extra leverage and applied gentle but firm pressure with NO hammers or sudden jerks. This allowed me to crack the seal of the thread lock used in the factory. I never had any problems with this. As soon as you apply shock or sudden pressure, that is when things break.

Once the bolts were out, I then used a TAP to clean the thread of the old thread lock. This made it easier to install the Givi bolts.

I would not be using anything like hammers and impact wrenches, but that is just my opinion and I have no need of them for this type of job.

Cheers
TS
Just used this method - under-seat key plus one of the other pieces in the kit for more leverage. They didn't come easy but gave way with enough pressure.
 

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Defeat the thread locker first. Put a soldering iron in the hex socket until the bolt gets hot enough to fry the thread locker.
 

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I fought mine until I used a 24" breaker bar with hex sockets from Harbor Freight. They came out like butter with that.
 
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