StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After around 10 years of riding, I'm thinking about actually paying some attention to my suspension. I'm looking for a good step-by-step approach, specifically for my 2013 DL650. My daily commute is around 25 miles, and most of that is on a road that -- thanks to our states woeful lack of highway funding -- has become a high-speed washboard. I'm tiring of the teeth-rattling ride.

What I've done so far: Virtually nothing. I don't think I've ever touched the rear adjuster in the 3 years I've owned my ride.

What's on the to-do list: Fork oil replacement, which hasn't been done since I picked up the bike and I have no knowledge of when it was last done.

What I won't be doing: Investing in a new rear shock or specialized fork springs (can't afford).

What I hope to do is get things as well-set as I can with what I have, then start planning for a down-the-line investment in a new shock and/or fork springs.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
121 Posts
A good synthetic fork oil, I used Amsoil 10 wt in mine will make the forks better. Just do some research to set the sag in the back and live with it until you decide to change out. I have had 2 bikes upgraded by HyperPro out of NJ at reasonable prices and fantastic results. Figure $100-$150 for springs and about $600-$700 for a rear shock. I sold my 2012 and bough a 2018 Triumph Tiger 800 low as I have short legs. The suspension on the low is so bad I tell everyone not to buy one. It had under 1,000 miles on it and I had it for sale at a loss of $3000+ I hated it so bad but no bites. A call to HyperPro and now it has 8,500 miles on it and I like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,765 Posts
So the problem with the forks is they are old school 70 year old damper rod technology. Adding thicker fork oil will add dampening but thats it. To modernize the fork to need to add some valving so for can adjust to changin road condition better and faster. Gold Valve Ricor Intimidators works well. I refer the Ricors for sheet as they all but eliminate nose diving under hard breaking.

Then you need to add springs to suite you weight and riding style and then fork oil to match the valving and sring rate.

Its a lot less complicated than it sounds and while it will go a long way into modernizing your forks please do not expect them to be modern USD cartridge forks.

The shock again it need to be valved, sprung and oil weight to suite you and your riding style.

Suspension is expensive. But good suspension is a game changer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,111 Posts
Some shock specialists, like Sasquatch Adventure Power Sports, LLC , can rework your shock for a good price.
Changing fork oil can be as simple as getting a long tube on a suction gun and removing as much as you can or as involved as dropping out of the fork yoke and inverting and allowing to drain. When I changed seals I think I just split a container of oil between the two when refilling. There are simple mods like adding sections of plastic tubing to increase the spring tension.
But, the local or long distance specialist can give you much more knowledgeable insight.
Some times asking here is like asking a group of blind guys to describe an elephant.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,022 Posts
The biggest improvement you can make is the proper fork and shock springs. Everything else is incremental. While you're working on the forks, you might as well install some valves and change the oil. I thing the shock is a worthwhile upgrade but it is low on the list.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,909 Posts
Depends, if you have a bad back a good rear shock will make a big difference. I have an old and beat up DL650 which has had suspension work and a much newer DL1000, every so often I hit something on the 1000 and wince, particularly since I know on the 650 the rear shock would have eaten that.

Problem is the DL1000 suspension is good enough, on the 650 it definately wasn't :).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
What do you weigh? Are you handy/have tools? Do you have any budget for upgrades?
I ride a 2012 650. I'm 180 pounds. I sent my rear shock to Jamie at Daugherty Motorsports to be rebuilt. I also ordered new springs and emulators from him. I installed the shock, springs and emulators which took part of a weekend. Transformed the bike.
Total cost 2 years ago was $530. Bike was off the road for a month which was a week each way of shipping and 2 weeks turnaround for the shock in the shop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,111 Posts
I sent mine to Saquatch when it had run out of oil, puked it's little guts out. I borrowed one from a fellow and rode the bike to a rally where Sasquatch brought my repaired shock and helped me install it. Then I gave the borrowed shock to the owner and everyone was happy.
I had a puking left fork seal and rode the bike back from St Paul Mn to Los Angeles. I'm so oblivious I didn't really notice a problem with it. Or might be that the original forks are so bad they don't need fluid and I'm used to it?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,877 Posts
The frugal, but completely wonderful approach would be sonic fork springs using their spring rate calculator and a progressive suspension rear shock from us.
^ This ^

You really can't make much of an improvement unless you have the right spring rates. Good suspension starts with that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
697 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
What I'm implying from all the response so far is that nothing I'm going to do with the stock adjustments will make any difference, so why bother?

At this point in time, my budget for any kind of suspension upgrades is highly dependent on how much it's going to cost me to fix my inoperative ABS system. I'll be taking it into a local shop soon for that to be looked at. If it's something simply I've overlooked in my attempts to fix it, I may have some money for suspension upgrades. If I have to replace an ABS control module, the suspension budget for this year will likely be $0.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,765 Posts
When/if you do the suspension budget a $1,000 or more.


Cogent has a nice bundle for the forks for $325.00 and $500 to $1,000 for a shock is not out of the question

Then comes the question is spending 30 to 50% of the value of the bike upgrading the suspension feasible?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,820 Posts
What I'm implying from all the response so far is that nothing I'm going to do with the stock adjustments will make any difference, so why bother?...
Changing the fork oil won't cost much especially if you use ATF (a lot of OEM fork fluid is ATF, the pink color is a clue!).

Changing the amount will effect the fork response. Less oil will make the dampening softer, more firmer. You can change the spring preload on the fork by altering the spacer. Use a piece of PVC.

Have you tried adjusting the shock? You can change preload and dampening but not rebound if I remember right.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,877 Posts
What I'm implying from all the response so far is that nothing I'm going to do with the stock adjustments will make any difference, so why bother?

At this point in time, my budget for any kind of suspension upgrades is highly dependent on how much it's going to cost me to fix my inoperative ABS system. I'll be taking it into a local shop soon for that to be looked at. If it's something simply I've overlooked in my attempts to fix it, I may have some money for suspension upgrades. If I have to replace an ABS control module, the suspension budget for this year will likely be $0.
Yeah, you can't do much. New fork oil will help a little, use 10w and set the level to 140mm. If you put better springs in at some point drop the level to 150mm. If you're over 200lbs max out the rear preload and damping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I had the dl650 2015 only for a few short rides but the front end was very odd as i am fat guy at 240. Anyway i had some old sv650 racetech springs. i also had a superbrace from the previous owner in a box. i put them both. He said he used ricor in there. so figuring he changed the oil i just lifted the front end to extend. pulled the springs and put the racetech ones ...what a difference. very plush when i hit a road full of pot holes and it just loves to lean and hold lines. Next spring upgrade on the rear shock. Again i am cheap i think i need to buy the spring .

Preload now i have at 1 as the racetech springs were 1.0 i think , old left over from a track bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
Does anyone know of a good spring shop/mechanic in the Seattle to Olympia area? My front springs are stiff at best and will beat me up on anything not Interstate smooth. Too much rear wheel hop on dirt roads.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,877 Posts
Does anyone know of a good spring shop/mechanic in the Seattle to Olympia area? My front springs are stiff at best and will beat me up on anything not Interstate smooth. Too much rear wheel hop on dirt roads.
Are they the stock springs? If so, the problem is that they are too soft, not too stiff.
Seems counterintuitive, but stiffer springs will give you a smoother, more comfortable ride.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,022 Posts
Does anyone know of a good spring shop/mechanic in the Seattle to Olympia area? My front springs are stiff at best and will beat me up on anything not Interstate smooth. Too much rear wheel hop on dirt roads.
Have you tried backing off the compression?
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top