StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Alright my friends, I have been thinking down the road a bit So I was wondering what would negate a change in tooth
count on the rear sprocket when those cogs get worn and the chain needs to be replaced.
Yes 1 extra or 1 less on the front counter sprocket makes more drastic changes overall.
Where altering the rear tooth count produces less drama and allows for subtle changes in gearing.

I figured with a 6 speed transmission (2017 650) That the gearing could be altered a bit by going 1 or 2 extra on the rear
tooth count. This will produce a more brisk acceleration with and less top end.

As per some of the reviews this bike already has a bit of short gearing ( more suited to off road) So it may be better to go with
1 or 2 less on the rear cog. With 70 h.p on hand I may find the sweet spot is all in the stock gearing.
I'm still going through break in . So I can only ask any of you who have this model year 650 to respond
if you have in fact altered the gearing on your bike.

Cheers jake CEO or RestoRides MotorSports
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,994 Posts
The three different generations of the V-Strom 650 share the same final gearing - 15/47 giving a 3.133 final drive ratio. The engine has evolved through those generations for a little more HP and torque but remains basically the same.

This means that you can search all similar threads on this forum, knowing that the knowledge learned on one generation will comfortably relate to the others.

In my experience one more tooth added to the rear sprocket is barely noticeable. As you are unsure if you wish to gear up or down I would be putting many more miles in various riding situations before deciding on any change. I find that my 650 is too highly geared in the dirt road tight stuff but perhaps geared a little low for high speed touring, so I have left it OEM. My perfect gearing would be to have lower 1st and 2nd gears with a higher 5th and 6th gears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I see well that makes sense. Since the tooth count will not change between gears
As in lower gears numerically higher and higher gears numerically lower. It is an accross
the board change. I'm looking for opinions on later options not for this moment.

It pays to do research thanks for your input. :wink2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,059 Posts
One in the front is the same as 3 in the back

On the 2012 - 2016 650's the 15T front sprocket is to low IMHO. No sooner did I let out the clutch I was shifting to second. I went up to a 16T counter sprocket early on and liked it much better. It lowered the RPM's at a given speed by about 500 RPM and made the speedo spot on. Win/win.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,225 Posts
From day one I new my V2 (2014 1000) was geared to high for me, I never used 6th gear and when loaded up in the dirt first was often to high so the clutch got some work.


I dropped one tooth from the front and it was exactly what I was looking for although I still often set my cruise control only to find I'm still in fifth gear.


Look in the V2 section for 16t = True Love for more on this subject.

Don't assume going down on the front or up on the back will drop your top speed, I dropped 1 tooth from the front of my Wee and I got a 0.5lt per 100ks fuel saving and a 5kph increase in top speed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,925 Posts
To clarify, the DL650 (stock 15F/47R) does better off-road with either a 14T front or a 3-4 tooth bigger (roughly 50T) on the rear. Since the rear sprocket size is restricted by the chain guard, the front sprocket is the the way to go. For off-road I like the 14/47 combination. Revs high at highway speeds but OK for town driving.
To drop rpm or give longer legs on top end (aka 6th gear), a 16T front or 3-4 tooth drop (roughly 43T) on the rear. Me personally, I like the 16F/45R combination for highway and town. Be advised that when I went 16F/42R town driving was limited to shifting between 3rd & 4th, with no happy medium. Of cause this combination gave of hell of a top end.
Did a similar test for a fellow biker, on a DL1000 (stock 17F/43R). As Rolex said, the smaller front (aka 16T) was better for the slow stuff and town. Open road we tested the 18F/42R combination. All I can say is that the DL1000 has the power and not afraid to show it.
Still say, go to gearing commander link. Input your data and preference.
 

·
Official Stromtrooper.com Sponsor
Joined
·
5,210 Posts
RestoRider2017, it all depends on how and where you will ride YOUR bike! If you won't be on the interstates droning on for hundreds of mile per day, the stock gearing is a very good compromise. Ride in some actual low speed off road, like rutted roads and stuff where you will be in first gear a lot, then going down one tooth on the front sprocket improves performance in those conditions. Might be a bit of a negative back on the highway, but 60 and under it will be just fine.

I like going up one tooth on the front sprocket. Several reasons. Not really all the much better on the highway at high speeds, but it is a bit more relaxed. The biggest surprise was how much nicer it was around town and back roads. Makes 2nd, 3rd, and 4th a lot more usable. And like mentioned above you don't feel like you need to shift to second gear immediately when taking off. One very positive outcome going to the 16t front sprocket is chain AND sprocket wear! The larger diameter of the 16t is easier on the chain. The 16t will outlast the 15t because the larger diameter and extra tooth transmit the load to the chain with less load per tooth. It just happens that the 16t makes your speedometer quite accurate. It will however make your odometer read a little low.

Not related exactly, but I put a 16t front sprocket on a DL 1000 and in just a few thousand miles it was showing a lot more wear than I think the stock 17t setup showed. I removed it and when back to a 17t. That can be just the brand of sprocket of course, but my history with chains has always been that a smaller front sprocket wears quicker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,925 Posts
Sorry,I wanted to add that if you want the front sprocket with the rubber insert in a different size to the stock DL650, have a look for the GSXR: 750 17/45 & 600 16/43 stock sizes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
RestoRider2017, it all depends on how and where you will ride YOUR bike! If you won't be on the interstates droning on for hundreds of mile per day, the stock gearing is a very good compromise. Ride in some actual low speed off road, like rutted roads and stuff where you will be in first gear a lot, then going down one tooth on the front sprocket improves performance in those conditions. Might be a bit of a negative back on the highway, but 60 and under it will be just fine.

I like going up one tooth on the front sprocket. Several reasons. Not really all the much better on the highway at high speeds, but it is a bit more relaxed. The biggest surprise was how much nicer it was around town and back roads. Makes 2nd, 3rd, and 4th a lot more usable. And like mentioned above you don't feel like you need to shift to second gear immediately when taking off. One very positive outcome going to the 16t front sprocket is chain AND sprocket wear! The larger diameter of the 16t is easier on the chain. The 16t will outlast the 15t because the larger diameter and extra tooth transmit the load to the chain with less load per tooth. It just happens that the 16t makes your speedometer quite accurate. It will however make your odometer read a little low.

Not related exactly, but I put a 16t front sprocket on a DL 1000 and in just a few thousand miles it was showing a lot more wear than I think the stock 17t setup showed. I removed it and when back to a 17t. That can be just the brand of sprocket of course, but my history with chains has always been that a smaller front sprocket wears quicker.
Rare Ford : Thanks for the feedback I will be looking at the 1 tooth larger Fr sprocket for sure. :wink2:
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,994 Posts
Yeah, nothing serious - just a slight adjustment. This is something that you cannot do via final gearing, and after all, these are not race bikes which need to be at max torque/power 24/7.

My thoughts are of a V-Strom bike that caters for both those that want lower gears in the dirt and those who want a little higher gearing on the motorway. Only the manufacturer can do that. Sure, it would mean a slightly larger jump in gearing between gears but that is why God invented the gearbox.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I myself would much rather have a little bit more range in each gear than it has now.
It seems first is so low that your barely moving before you find second.
I take off in second most of the time with little if any issue.

Where 5th and 6th gears are pretty right on. I plan to go 1 tooth more on the CS sprocket
And in doing so will make 3rd and 4th more usable and 5th and 6th spaced higher in the cruising
speed range. So a win win.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
I love this site. This is just what I was looking for. I have a 2008 Wee that I went up one tooth on the CS to give me better mileage and touring capability. It worked out very well. This is the bike I did my CC 50 Iron Butt ride on, never missed a beat. My current adventure is to put a sidecar on it. Well actually put a sidecar on one of my motorcycles. I spoke with a couple of folks in the business and both (they are competitors) felt the wee was my best option. More horsepower than my R80 RT, better brakes, etc. So a hack for the Wee. I then realized, (I can be slow), if I hacked the Wee I wouldn't have it to ride as a motorcycle. Traded CB 1100 for 2012 Adventure. Now I can hack one and ride the other. Now to the gearing. It seems a 14/47 will be perfect for the hack, good low end for starts, top speed is not critical as I won't be on the superslab with the hack and 16/47 for the street Wee. I will probably hack the 2012 as it has a bit more horsepower and torque. I am certainly open to any feedback if you folks see flaws in my logic. Thanks for everything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,925 Posts
.....I am certainly open to any feedback if you folks see flaws in my logic.......
Sounds like you are on the right track. I suggest that maybe you should start a new dedicated thread wrt your hack project and keep us updated on your various stages of progress. Post plenty of pix please. Like to hear what you have planned / views for the gearbox as regards a reverse gear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
Does anyone have a part number for the Suzuki OEM 16T (one tooth larger) rubberized front sprocket? I searched for GSX 750 but could not find anything either. All I can find is the JT brand. These sprockets are so inexpensive I’d rather buy the best quality possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,925 Posts
Look up the part numbers for the following bikes, they will work on the V-Strom and as OEM they will have the rubber insert on the front sprocket:
GSXR600 (97, 01-05) - 16F / 45R
GSXR600 (98-00)- 16F / 46R
GSXR600 (06-11) - 16F / 43R
GSXR750 (98-99) - 16F / 45R
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,192 Posts
Look up the part numbers for the following bikes, they will work on the V-Strom and as OEM they will have the rubber insert on the front sprocket:
GSXR600 (97, 01-05) - 16F / 45R
GSXR600 (98-00)- 16F / 46R
GSXR600 (06-11) - 16F / 43R
GSXR750 (98-99) - 16F / 45R
What Gert said.

I have used part number 27510-20A10 for a GSXR600.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
Look up the part numbers for the following bikes, they will work on the V-Strom and as OEM they will have the rubber insert on the front sprocket:
GSXR600 (97, 01-05) - 16F / 45R
GSXR600 (98-00)- 16F / 46R
GSXR600 (06-11) - 16F / 43R
GSXR750 (98-99) - 16F / 45R
What Gert said.

I have used part number 27510-20A10 for a GSXR600.
Great. Thank you, Gert and Stalky! I will call the dealer when they open back up next week.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top